Need a new TS rip blade.

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--
Jim in NC



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" I have seen and heard ..."
I am not citing anicdotal evidence. I am citing the closest thing to a labratory experiment available, the FWW labs. They tested thin kerf alongside full size and found NO evidence of "wobble" or deflection, even specifically on shaving cuts where one side of the blade is unsupported.
But no one is stopping you from buying extra metal amd making extra sawdust and wearing our your saw motor extra early and burning rips when you bog your saw, etc. etc.
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On 8/18/2010 6:31 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

As most of us don't work under laboratory conditions, citing your own personal experience, as others have done, and with _your_ own equipment in actual shop conditions, would carry much more weight.
And "YMMV" does have a very specific meaning/intent when addressing these types of issues.
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experiements. However, I never started using thin kerf on a regular basis until after I read the report that debunked the deflection problem. So I assume that my experience is tainted by my beliefs just like someone who believes deflection will happen will believe they see it. So the lab provides the empirical (sp?) evidence.
Anyway, I am just so happy to see an actual wood working topic I had to spout. Trying to dust up some trouble is just a way to prolong the pleasure. Actually surprised to see certain responders, having assumed I was a strong kill file candidate long ago.
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I have personally witnessed think kerf blades warp from heat during use... they "pop" back into position after they cool.
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I used to have a one horsepower tablesaw. Never used thin kerf blades on it. Never had any trouble cutting whatever I wanted on it. Blade design and feed rate are much more important than blade thickness.
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Quite obviously a standard kerf blade will use 33% more power than a thin kerf. If the saw has enough power with a standard kerf blade, of course you won't see a difference. If it's marginal thin-kerf is a good idea.
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Where do you get this nonsense from? Ever see a max kerf size on a motor rating?
Quite obviously a standard kerf blade will use 33% more power than a thin kerf. If the saw has enough power with a standard kerf blade, of course you won't see a difference. If it's marginal thin-kerf is a good idea.
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Nonsense? Not quite. I would say it is settled science that a thin kerf blade requires much less energy to cut the same board. Every review and study I have seen published, regardless of the wobble issue, shows that lower powered saw can cut boards easily with a thin kerf that they cannot cut or only burn bog cut with a full width blade. Pretty simpel to visualize removing less material with each bite. Ever spend much time on the business end of a shovel?
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I always hold onto the handle to operate a shovel.
wrote:

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Nonsense? Not quite. I would say it is settled science that a thin kerf blade requires much less energy to cut the same board. Every review and study I have seen published, regardless of the wobble issue, shows that lower powered saw can cut boards easily with a thin kerf that they cannot cut or only burn bog cut with a full width blade. Pretty simpel to visualize removing less material with each bite. Ever spend much time on the business end of a shovel? ******************************
All good and well, until you start cutting thick wood, hard wood, wet wood (treated) of if the blade starts to get dull.
Then they can get hot, and can wobble, flex, and turn into more of a bowl shape than anything else. I have seen that happen.
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Jim in NC



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On Fri, 20 Aug 2010 10:55:09 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com"

Don't feed the troll.
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That is with the assumption that the thin and thick are equal in quality and sharpness. A premium regular kerf will cut better and faster than a mediocre thin kerf blade on the same saw.
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..
The rotating mass alone gives the thicker blade an advantage....and yes, assuming relative sharpness and quality of teeth.
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I like the thick blades too, but as far as momentum of the higher mass thick blade?
Naa. You can kill that momentum difference in a fraction of a second.
The key that everyone (almost) is missing is the number of teeth, as it is the KEY factor.
Each tooth uses some HP as it shears, and tears through the wood. If you have less teeth, it will use less HP to pull the fewer teeth through the wood.
Plus, fewer teeth means more space between the tooth and the body of the blade. You need that space for ripping, because the good sharp tooth will pull the wood fibers out in a longer chip, since it is with the grain. Cutting across the grain, the chips stay small because the wood separates between the summer and winter wood as it is sheared off. Ripping is like it says; it rips (more than shears) a long line of grain out of the stock.
But the key is the number of teeth. Less teeth = less HP required. Simple rule.
Tell you what. If you have never used an 8 tooth rip blade, find someone to buy one from that will give you a money back guarantee if you do not like it. My bet is that you will like it and you will keep it, and mount it and leave it, or change back to it when you need to rip a quanity of wood.
A plain high-speed-steel blade is fine, also. You can sharpen it yourself with a dremmel tool and a cutoff blade when it is dull, and re-set the stagger with a little ball peen hammer and a vice when you need to. It will be the last rip blade you buy for a long time.
--
Jim in NC



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wrote:

I'm not buying that at all. The only way this is true is if the feed rate is proportional to the number of teeth. That is, the amount of work done by each tooth is the same on different blades. This obviously isn't true because a blade with more teeth (all else equal) will leave smaller scores in the cut (smaller bites).

Now you're comparing totally different operations. Apples and oranges.

Not buying it.

If you're sawing raw planks, perhaps.

If you work on a British Leylands car every night, you might be able to drive it to work each morning.
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I have only one question. Have you tried an eight tooth blade for use in cutting hard to cut wood, so hard to cut that it is close to the limit of what your saw can cut at decent feed rates?
If the answer is no, you are only guessing about what I have written about.
If you don't buy that, then that is your loss.
I know of what I speak. So do a few others.
So, come back and say you don't buy it after you have tried it. Until then, well....
--
Jim in NC



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wrote:

Go fuck yourself.
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I don't understand a remark like that.
If you are not here to learn something new, they why are you here.
Unless you know-it-all already. I don't.
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Jim in NC



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wrote:

Why am I not surprised?

I'm not here for your smug condescension.

Quite obviously.
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