Natural Gas Garage Heaters - The Heater Shop

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yep, I leave mine all the way down and it stays about 50. When I go out to work in the shop, I crank it up to about 65, that's warm enough for me. Even if I could run it down lower, I would not due to the condensation problem that can arise when rapidly changing temps and metal tools.
I'm in central NC, and use less than 300 gallons of propane a year (have to pay the rental fee on the tank because I don't use more!). that covers the "garden shed" and the shop. the garden shed probably uses more than half of that because of the large window area.
BRuce
Bob G wrote:

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BRuce


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http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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Thanks guys.... The Tank has been delivered & is full......now I have to trench & run a gas line down to the shop..(200 foot)....until then I am swapping out 100 Pound tanks of propane like I did last year...
$1.90 a gallon with the large tank...$2.40 a gal with the 100 pound tanks... Price was not the big deal last year BUT with 3 foot of snow..on the ground I could not swap the 100 pound tanks, they were frozen in place...
.Once everything is up and running I think I will just set the Thermostat at 50 or so and leave it that way...
Bob Griffiths
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degrees when you leave. My heat runs at 45 degrees unless I plan on beijng out here the next day. Then I leave it at 65, but then my shop is fairly tight, so it is pretty easy to heat.
I have AC in my shop too. You gatta love it when the temps and humidity start creeping up to 100! Greg
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Charlie, did you missd the part where I said I did HVAC work for a living? I have checked them out, my opinion stands! Any heater, that right in the instructions requires an open window or door for fresh air is not going to be recomended by me, or anyone that I know that does this for a living either! We had a customer that wanted one installed. We would not do it, headed him in the direction of a vented heater.
You can find vented heaters that cost within a few dollars of the unvented heaters, very simular units, they just have a air intake, and exhaust that goes through the wall. Greg
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Charlie Self wrote:

Well, it's sort of so. It doesn't have to deplete enough oxygen to trip the sensor to make the air "funky."
Mine is propane, but I'd be surprised if natural gas is any better. I run my un-vented propane heater out here in the den to take the chill off in the morning, but I can't tolerate leaving it going all the time.
Even just running the pilot for a few hours does something nebulous and intangible to the quality of the room that causes it to have a bad vibe. It just doesn't "feel" right. Too little oxygen, too much CO, too much humidity, byproducts from the fart-smelling stuff they put in the gas... Damfino. It doesn't trip the CO sensor, but the air just doesn't feel right.
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I believe that this is another of the religious wars. There are no right answers just opinions. I have 3 unvented heaters and would buy another in a minute. One in the "garden shed" to keep the plants warm through the winter, one in the shop to keep me warm in the winter and one in the new craft room above the shop to keep SWMBO warm in the winter. None of the heaters manuals mention opening a window, there is no window in the shop and one window in the craft room.
I do have unvented gas logs in the house, the manual does recommend either opening a window a small amount of leaving the flue open slightly, and I do leave the flue open about 1/3. The CO2 monitor has never registered anything but 0.0
FACT: I don't have a problem with air quality, I don't have a rust problem. those are things I can prove by the past 2 seasons.
OPINION: I don't have a dust explosion problem and I don't have a solvent fume explosion problem. Both due to the small volume of dust and the type of finishing I do.
BRuce
Charlie Self wrote:

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BRuce


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BRuce <BRuce> wrote:

CO more likely. Carbon monoxide, not carbon dioxide. Mine hasn't either, incidentally. I'm beginning to wonder if the damn thing even works. Maybe these carbon monoxide detectors are just a circuit to make 0.0 appear on the LED display. :)
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yep, to much CO2 to remember that the monitor is for CO. With the cost of the monitor, I would think that it should read read at least 0.00 :)
Silvan wrote:

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BRuce <BRuce> wrote:

Yeah, seriously. Maybe 00.00 even.
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BRuce wrote:

You've never seen anything cold (glass, can, bottle) sweat on a typical summer day? Hell, it doesn't even have to be cold.
Humid air + cold surfaces = condensation.
I've seen it in my own shop. While working at the propane retailer I was asked what could be done about it by people having problems, notably their tools getting wet.
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why would anything be cold? It has been in the shop and I specifically addressed large temperature swings. if your leave the heater on pilot and the temp gets to 35 and then you run out and jack it up to 65 then you are going to get condensation regardless of the type of heat. propane may put some additional water vapor into the air but it won't make any difference in the rust factor.
BRuce
Mark wrote:

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Got rid of my kerosene and unvented wall heaters which I have been using for years and installed a 45K btu propane fired Modine hot dawg, It works like a charm and keeps my shop nice and comfortable along with no odors from the other heaters. Cost was approx $500 for everything less cost for a propane fill-up. Well worth the cost as far as I am concerned.
Mike

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