Natural Gas Garage Heaters - The Heater Shop

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Looking for a heater for my garage workshop. Came across the www.heatershop.com site. They have a wall mounted natural gas heater which is ventless and claims to be suitable for dusty workshops. Just wondering if anyone has any experiences with this heater good or bad.
Thx.
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don't have this one but it will pull the dust into the bottom and "burn it off" just like the ones you can get at the borg. I have an infrared or catalyst type and I like it (yes, it still "burns off" the dust). there are others that feel that your shop will blow up if you use these and only recommend a sealed burner unit, $$$.
BRuce
Tony DiBratto wrote:

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BRuce


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BRuce said

I'd be more concerned about vapors from finishing products. Turning the heater off while you're spraying or the can is open should mitigate any danger from that.
Yes, sawdust in the air can explode when exposed to open flame, but it has to be in a rather narrow range of concentration. 20% comes to mind, but I may me misremembering.
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Have you looked into the Modine Hot Dawg? Here is the web site http://hot-dawg.modine.com / Have seen them reveiwed in one of the magazines (can't remember wich one), they got a great review. Jim

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Ventless is a poor idea for anywhere. The moisture produced from burning gas will raise the humidity of your shop greatly. Go with a vented unit heater, Reznor, Modine, plus others out there are much better. Greg
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This is nonsense, yes there is water vapor produced by burning propane BUT it is not enough to raise the humidity any higher than a usual summer day in the southern US. Perhaps even less.
I have used mine for 2 full seasons, (closed shop, no windows, 13 x 27) this will be the third season and there isn't anymore dampness in the air than at any other time. My tools don't rust any faster in the winter than at any other time.
if you subject your shop to rapid temperature swings you will get more rust from that than any propane heater.
BRuce
Greg O wrote:

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BRuce


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BRuce wrote:

Having been to Atlanta in August I'd say you're correct. About 85% to 100% humidity at 75 degrees, dropping to about 55% - 60% at 100 degrees.
Does anybody know what that would equate to when the temperature is dropped to say 40 degrees?
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Yes, fog or rain!
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Erik "Grumpa" Ahrens
Apprentice Termite
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brought forth from the murky depths:

Bloody cold, Yack. (Sorry, couldn't resist.)
http://www.srh.noaa.gov/jan/new_metcal_java.html Meterological calc online. Will this help?
----------------------------------------------------------------------- A PSYCHOLOGIST looks at everyone -else- || http://www.diversify.com when an attractive woman enters the room. || Full Website Programming
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The amount of water in the air, giving relative humidity of 88% at 75 degree F, *IF* you could keep it all in the air at 40F, it would be a relative humidity of THREE HUNDRED FOURTEEN percent. *snort*
A relative humidity of 28.1% at 75 deg F, when cooled to 40 deg F gives a relative humidity of 100%.
21% humidity at 75 deg F will give 100% humidity at freezing. 15% humidity at 75 deg F will give 100% humidity at about 25 deg F.
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<BRuce> wrote in message

Well, others here have stated having moisture problems with unvented heaters. A second reason I would not have an unvented heater is you are exhausting the burner right into you working/living area. You are also slowly depleting the oxygen that is being used for combustion. It is so easy in the majority of the situations to install a vented heater that a non-vented unit makes little sense. Greg
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non vented is great, unless you have a perfectly sealed structure where the unit resides.

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Greg O writes:

Not so. There is an O2 depletion sensor on the unit, and it shuts down if that happens.

What does the vented cost? You can get a 25,000 Btu unvented for under $150, IIRC. Installation costs maybe $30 more.
Charlie Self
"Say what you will about the ten commandments, you must always come back to the pleasant fact that there are only ten of them." H. L. Mencken
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In my opinion, you can do it right or you can do it cheap, you can't have both! I am a heating and AC tech, I would not put an unvented heater anywhere! You are spewing exhaust back into your working area! I would bet the owners manual for the heater requires the operator to keep a window or door cracked for fresh air. Do it right, put in a Reznor or a Modine Hot Dawg. You would not install a gas furnace in your house and run the exhaust into your living room, would you? You can build nice cabinets with a $199 table saw too, why would anyone buy a Unisaw? Greg
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Greg O writes:

I've never seen one that does. These things have been in use in Yurp for a couple decades with few problems. They've been in use here about 5 years.
Some people can't afford the top of the line stuff, just as your later analogy, the $199 saw versus the Unisaw, shows. Many people can't afford a Unisaw, many more can afford the $199 saw (and the steps upward).

No. And you're not doing that with these units, either. Check them out before you jump all over people for using them. They are not constructed like the catalytic heaters or salamanders. Burn efficiency, IIRC, is in the 99.8% or so range. They are not recommended for use in small rooms, generally, but there's enough air exchange in rooms over about 10x10 to allow their use.
Unvented gas heaters are not ideal solutions, but they are not as bad as you make out.
Charlie Self
"Say what you will about the ten commandments, you must always come back to the pleasant fact that there are only ten of them." H. L. Mencken
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thanks Charlie, didn't know they had been in use that long. One more fact for the file.
BRuce
Charlie Self wrote:

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BRuce


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Another question that just popped into my head while reading these posts on shop heating...
My sons installed a natural gas furnace ( converted to propane) and a central a/c unit in my shop the summer before last and this summer I had the a/c unit set at 80 or so all summer long 24/7
I could cool the place off when I really needed to...and the Electric bill really did not suffer ...
NOW that winter is here what do I do....?
Last winter I had it turned off ... when I went out I fired up the furnace and also a 30,000 btu Kero heater to take off the chill (Kero ran for 20 or so minutes) then the furnace ran by itself...
Shop is insulated, but not really insulated well, I was thinking of leaving the furnace on and set the thermostat to something in the low 50s' or maybe even high 40s'
Cost is a factor but I sure did not mind the cost of the A/C... Figure 20 degree difference in Temp from Max or Min outside Temp...
How do you guyts do this.... I am retired and I do use the shop almost daily...
Bob Griffiths
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Bob G asks:

I forget where you're located, Bob, but what I do is keep the shop just warm enough to prevent glue and finish deterioration from cold...above freezing, but far from warm, no more than 50 or so. About as low as my cheap thermostat will go and not shut things off. Actually, this winter it's off all the way (I'm not back yet), and the garage here has only a catalytic propane heater that won't quite do all I would like, but is a little better than nothing. This garage is so leaky I don't even open the door. Forget the windows: they were shut in '15 and probably haven't moved since...I moved something in front of the back wall one day, and one of the old iron weights came tumbling out at me.
Shops don't need to be really warm (never mind, Bobby W. You're a special case, one of two people I know who prefer it in the 80s when they work, summer and winter). I like mine at 55-60, unless I'm gluing or finishing. Helps soothe the cheapskate in me (nothing like being at least a major part Scot), but also, I tend to sweat very easily, so it reduces the dripping on projects and tools.
Charlie Self
"Say what you will about the ten commandments, you must always come back to the pleasant fact that there are only ten of them." H. L. Mencken
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Ok Charlie, what part is Scottish? And the Scottish KNOW that they are Scottish- SCOTCH is a damn drink. But I hear over and over how "they" are Scotch. Glad you said Scot.
On 29 Nov 2003 14:08:15 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

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Lawrence Ramsey asks:

My wallet.
Charlie Self
"Say what you will about the ten commandments, you must always come back to the pleasant fact that there are only ten of them." H. L. Mencken
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