Nails or screws to fasten fence of pressure treated (ACQ) southern yellow pine lumber


Hi
I wanted to get recommendations on what fasteners to use to build a fence of ACQ pressure treated southern yellow pine lumber.
For attaching the rails to the posts, I am thinking of using 3" long nails/screws and for attaching pickets to rails, using 1 3/8" long nails/screws.
There seem to be at least 4 choices at the local hardware store, along with rough costs for the number of nails/screws I need.
1. Hot dipped galvanized smooth shank nails - $48 2. Hot dipped galvanized ring shank nails - $66 3. Deckmate coated (not galvanized but supposed to hold up outdoor) screws - $150 4. Stainless steel screws - $300
The local hardware store sales person said I should NOT use the hot dipped galvanized smooth shank nails as the pickets/rails would come out as the wood shrinks. He recommended at least using the hot dipped galvanized ring shank nails - with this he expected I would get approx 8-10 years on ACQ pine if the pine was not sealed/stained after installation, and 10-15 years if the ACQ pine was sealed/stained. He also said going up to Deckmate coated screws would be better and Stainless steel screws the best. I was given to understand by the hardware sales person that even hot dipped galvanized nails (smooth or ring shank) would rust after a few years. Further the sales person said that ACQ pressure treated lumber would probably start rotting in 10-15 years.
I was thinking of using the hot dipped galvanized ring shank nails, given the 10-15 years life of the ACQ pine lumber, the screw/nail material costs above and much higher labor costs involved with using screws.
I having this built by a handyman who will build the fence but I am providing the materials. The handyman is suggesting I should use the hot dipped galvanized ring shank nails 1 3/8" for attaching pickets to the rails. Wrt attaching the rails to the posts, the handy man is suggesting NOT to use the hot dipped galvanized ring shank nails 3" but to use the regular hot dipped galvanized smooth shank nails 3".
Any recommendations on which fasteners I should buy and have the handyman use.
Thanks Bob
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Personally, that's what I would choose. I've never used galvanized ring shank nails but have used 10s of 1000s of bronze ones and they *do* hold better. Note that *any* fastener holds better if it is driven at an angle.
--
dadiOH
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote: snip

It would seem to me that the higher initial investment in materials and labor will be well worth it in the long run. I'm a big proponent of "Buy the last one first."
Having said that, my vote obviously is for screws, probably stainless.
-Phil Crow
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| Hi | | I wanted to get recommendations on what fasteners to use to build a | fence of ACQ pressure treated southern yellow pine lumber. | | For attaching the rails to the posts, I am thinking of using 3" long | nails/screws and for attaching pickets to rails, using 1 3/8" long | nails/screws. | | There seem to be at least 4 choices at the local hardware store, along | with rough costs for the number of nails/screws I need. | | 1. Hot dipped galvanized smooth shank nails - $48 | 2. Hot dipped galvanized ring shank nails - $66 | 3. Deckmate coated (not galvanized but supposed to hold up outdoor) | screws - $150 | 4. Stainless steel screws - $300 | | The local hardware store sales person said I should NOT use the hot | dipped galvanized smooth shank nails as the pickets/rails would come | out as the wood shrinks. He recommended at least using the hot dipped | galvanized ring shank nails - with this he expected I would get approx | 8-10 years on ACQ pine if the pine was not sealed/stained after | installation, and 10-15 years if the ACQ pine was sealed/stained. He | also said going up to Deckmate coated screws would be better and | Stainless steel screws the best. I was given to understand by the | hardware sales person that even hot dipped galvanized nails (smooth or | ring shank) would rust after a few years. Further the sales person said | that ACQ pressure treated lumber would probably start rotting in 10-15 | years. | | I was thinking of using the hot dipped galvanized ring shank nails, | given the 10-15 years life of the ACQ pine lumber, the screw/nail | material costs above and much higher labor costs involved with using | screws. | | I having this built by a handyman who will build the fence but I am | providing the materials. The handyman is suggesting I should use the | hot dipped galvanized ring shank nails 1 3/8" for attaching pickets to | the rails. Wrt attaching the rails to the posts, the handy man is | suggesting NOT to use the hot dipped galvanized ring shank nails 3" | but to use the regular hot dipped galvanized smooth shank nails 3". | | Any recommendations on which fasteners I should buy and have the | handyman use. | | Thanks | Bob |
If you can afford it, stainless steel. They do not rust, and they can be had in an aggressive twist which will hold the wood better.
I have those really good dipped screws in my deck and, after 5 years in cedar, they are almost eaten in half. I know this because I had to replace some boards when my TV tower decided to fall over. -- PDQ
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Keep in mind that several of the treated pine pickets will warp as they dry out. Cedar pickets will last almost as long with far fewer warps but will generally cost twice as much. The cedar will look better longer than the treated.
Screws have the advantage of easy removal and that is about it. Good if you are not handy with a hammer when you decide to replace some of the warped boards. I prefer the galvanized ring shank nails for the pickets and galvanized for the rails. I always use electroplated galvanized nails as I always use a nail gun.
Consider also adding a treated 1x6 on the bottom under the pickets. Let the pickets set on top of rail. This keeps the pickets off the ground so that they do not wick moisture up through the bottoms and also saves labor time as this board provides a level surface to set the pickets on and the pickets go up much faster with less measuring. Last I would also advise to consider a 3rd middle rail. This will help prevent the pickets that are going to warp from warping as badly and adds strength to the fence.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I have wondered about galvanized nails having seen the zinc flake off the heads while driving it in. My fence has galvanized screws but now usually use SS square drive screws. Stainless is softer than regular steel and the head will strip if you don't keep pressure on the driver.
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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A cordless impact driver is just the ticket for the softer SS screw slots.
On Thu, 20 Apr 2006 19:58:06 -0400, Gerald Ross

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You didn't mention spiral flute nails. Those won't work loose. Only use one per picket to prevent shrinking and splitting. Built 250 ft. of fence five years ago and there's not a loose picket anywhere. I recommend a coat of clear sealer for maintenance every year or two depending on your climate. Bugs
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