Nailing baseboards?

Placing three piece base boards around bathroom floor. Lots of little pieces and returns. The two vertical pieces are a wood composite and the base shoe is PVC. 3/4" tall and 1/2" wide. Using a Senco finish nailer, 1-1/2" nails. 85-90 psi. The trouble is with the PVC. First nail makes a u-turn and pierces my hand. Ok, get full face shield. Later two more nails do u-turns and in three instances the PVC shatters.
So what is the correct procedure now that I already purchase the wrong product(PVC)? Do you glue it on? Should I drill 1/16" holes and hand nail? All advice appreciated.
Ivan Vegvary
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It sounds like you are using solid PVC rather than cellular PVC. I know solid PVC piping will shatter under stress, so I imagine PVC moldings will need pre-drilling. Probably the cellular version could be power nailed.
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On 1/30/2013 11:05 AM, EXT wrote:

Agreed here, I have never ever had an issue with the cellular PVC.
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On 1/30/13 11:01 AM, Ivan Vegvary wrote:

I glue shoe mold all the time. Hot glue, Super glue. Combination of hot glue and trim glue-- hot glue acts like a clamp until trim glue cures.
Titebond Molding glue is very thick and tacky and sets up fast. I often get away with just this glue, pressing into place and the tackiness holds it in place. When that doesn't work, next step is simple masking tape to hold until set. http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page1183
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-MIKE-

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Sorry for the misfire/double tap. I have been away from the group long enough I forgot how everything works.
Anyway, if you are having the troubles you describe, check out your nails. They are all made in China these days and simply branded with a name. They buy in lots of sizes, then label them for the purchaser. At the advice of the guys that do my gun maintenance (and where I buy my nails) I take my trim guns with me to make sure any new or different nail brands actually fit the guns. I have had a couple of three incidents where recognized brand nails didn't fit my Bostitch guns as they nails were too long or the brads themselves were too skinny to keep from an occasional misfire when the gun grabbed a nail and 10% of its neighbor.
That being said, I found an interesting problem with my nails when I was experiencing your same circumstances. The nails for the gun were not pointed, but only chisel pointed (ground one side). They gripped like hell when they actually went in something, but most turned back around and actually came back out of the trim when they were shot into trim. I took them back to my suppliers and they pulled every box off the shelf that had those improperly ground nails in it. Interestingly, it was only two sizes.
I shoot on a types of PVC with no problem. Bostitch trim guns (not the ones in the box store) hit pretty hard and will drive a 2" brad flush into white oak. Senco is more of a home use brand these days, but a very serviceable gun (much cheaper, too!). Any gun out there will drive brads that size with no problems, so I don't believe it is a gun problem.
I would look at my nails. Additionally, Like MIKE, I glue some pieces. I put the trim on the saw horse and shoot it onto piece of scrap to see how close I can get to the end of the trim before it splits or chips off. Any piece that is shorter than my split trim difference gets PL400 and it is mated for life to the surface.
Wood, plastic or other, if it is a small piece that won't stay in place, glue it and put some masking tape on it to hold it on place overnight. Today's adhesives are just marvelous. This method is also handy if you are working in a high vis place where you don't want a puttied nail head to show.
Robert
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On 1/30/13 3:26 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

So you use that stuff, huh? Is it really the bee's knees?
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All that and more. If the surfaces are fairly clean, I use it to glue plywood to concrete, wood to wood, make a quick ready to use framing part as gusset glue, and glue trims where you can't nail. It is structurally sound, fills gaps well, and dries hard. It can be painted, but cannot be sanded, filled or anything else. It is just an adhesive.
I started using it back in the 70s when I was employed by a commerical contractor and it was spec'ed out on a job as the preferred adhesive. We used it to glue fiberglass panels up (restaurant kitchens) and to adhere wooden moldings that were prefinished and couldn't be nailed.
Later, I had a bunch of it from a job that I took out to test it on other projects. Loved it. It is gooey and sticky, so you don't need much clamp pressure (if any) for small pieces.
On the kitchen I just finished I used about 4 - 5 caulk gun sized tubes. I glued on some plywood filler to the concrete slab to build it up to the tile height and secured it with some punch pins. I glue my wedges in place along the bottom of cabinets where they hit the floor and then flush cut them when I set cabinets. I glue all shims and other pieces in place, and glue any wedges (usually a brad is there, too) I put in to straighten out my cabinet installs. I glued in small pieces of base and shoe trim, and even glued on the stainless steel back splash (30" X 30") onto the sheet rock when finishing up. About six pencil eraser sized dots on a piece of screen where I couldn't get the brad gun in worked perfectly to hold it the trim in place (used tape as a clamp). PL400 bites right through lacquered and most painted finishes so it has it uses when finishing out.
Love the stuff. Dries faster than yellow glue for structure work, but won't make up a joint as tightly as the yellow stuff if it is a repair of trims or finish work. I can't imagine repair or remodel without a few tubes of that on reserve.
Robert
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