nail gun fun?

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/photos/0,,20053900,00.html?xid=cnn-0807-nailed?cnn=yes
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Ouch. I see a lot of these in my job (hand surgeon). We even had one newsworthy homicide by nailgun when I first moved into town. I thought of moving back out. . .
Big staples are harder to remove. You have to cut the top (if above the skin), then pull them out like two separate nails. Nails with the barbs (from the wire connecting the nails) can also be tough without a little local anesthetic, even if they are not in the bone.
I believe all the pictures, except the first which is a poor Photoshop job. The nail thru the bone should look white on the xray (as it does in all the others).
Thanks for the reminder that nailgun safeties are far from foolproof, and they can cause some big injuries. Especially to the hand holding the wood, and (for some reason) to the thigh and knee. I'm not quite sure how you get hit in the head, but I'm sure people find ways.
David S.
John Grossbohlin wrote:

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/photos/0,,20053900,00.html?xid=cnn-0807-nailed?cnn=yes

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snipped-for-privacy@nospamnetscape.net says...

Yupp. The ones capable of 'bump nailing' are much more dangerous than the other kind (forget what it's called). My Senco is the 'other kind' and if you have the trigger touched while you depress the safety it absolutely won't fire.
Which prevents the kind of scenario: get down to nail something on the ground - lose your balance - fingers involuntarily grip the nailgun - touch [bodypart] with the safety, depressing it. Oops.
I've used a 'bump gun' and I found it quite scary.
-P.
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The bump nailing is called contact trip. The single-shot mode is called restrictive or selective. These tools are like chainsaws - do NOT let others use them unless they claim to know what they are doing. You won't truly know until you see the guy who is a pro, on a volunteer work site, holding two 2x4's together(with his left hand), then nailing the boards together and penetrating a finger on the far side. Just enough to draw blood and make a mess. Knots are prime candidates for fastener deflection. T
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on 9/1/2007 7:49 PM Peter Huebner said the following:

...and less accurate.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Peter Huebner wrote:

Yep. But it's impressive to watch an experienced roofer with a bump gun.
Of course, you really want to hope that they're hitting the trusses....
Chris
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David wrote: <snip>

I almost copped it in the head while framing a house. My brother was nailing 2 90x45's together when the nail deflected off a knot hidden inside the timber. The nail must have moved about 12 inches from its intended direction the knot separated the 2 pieces of pine and ended up about 45 degrees from where it should have gone. Now I have learned my lesson and don't place myself or anyone else within 180 degrees, forward of the gun.
Andrew
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