My workbench design project

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Thanks for your replies, Larry, you provided several helpful comments that I found quite insightful.
I just have two, 30" four-by-fours, seeking a quarter-circle on each end. Like the feet in this workbench:
http://www.finewoodworking.com/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id3067
Bill
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On Sun, 4 Apr 2010 14:40:50 -0400, the infamous "Bill"

Thanks and jewelcome.

Yeah, easy enough on the bandsaw. You could pivot the piece on the nail on your locator board instead of using extra nailsif you wanted. That's what I'd probably do.
I cut these freehand, bottoms and ends. http://fwd4.me/6oE
-- In order that people may be happy in their work, these three things are needed: They must be fit for it. They must not do too much of it. And they must have a sense of success in it. -- John Ruskin, Pre-Raphaelitism, 1850
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Nice. I like the "hollow" in the base between the ends of the feet. Garrett Hack sketches a hollow in his workbench diagram, but the feature does not appear in his actual bench.
Intuitively, seems like stability would be easier to obtain with hollow (less contact area) but that the hollow could create a point of weakness. Maybe there's no such thing as a weak 4 by 4, I'm not sure. I like the look of it though.
Bill

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On Sun, 4 Apr 2010 18:21:27 -0400, the infamous "Bill"

True!
There is if you cut 3" away. ;)

Ditto. It's the traditional look/style.
-- In order that people may be happy in their work, these three things are needed: They must be fit for it. They must not do too much of it. And they must have a sense of success in it. -- John Ruskin, Pre-Raphaelitism, 1850
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