My Resawing Needs Work!!!

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Making the panels for my bookcase. Resawing 6.5" wide 4/4 cherry. Ended up with 0.35" thick panels.
I ended up having to free-hand track (no fence) the board through the blade because my fence is either moving or flexing. This gave me pretty wavy boards.
I am pretty sure I need to make a new re-saw fence for my Rikon. One more thing to do...
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I noticed that too when I had the Rikon, it is was really the fence so much as the blade.
But to rule out a few things,,,,
1. You did adjust the fence for drift,,,,right. 1. You are using a 1 to 3 TPI blade.....right. 1. You have the blade properly tensioned.......
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1. Drift- yes. The fence moves though. If you push the tail end of the fence it will also felx. POS fence!!! 2. I use a 1" Wood Slicer. (nice blade!!) 3. Yes. The blade doesn't 'cup' the wood, which I use as an indicator of improper tension.
I am either going to build a nice re-saw fence or make a good single- contact pivot fence.
I'm still very happy with the bandsaw otherwise. Just that POS fence!!
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wrote:

correction. 3/4" WoodSlicer. (went and measured it.)
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Try a _narrower_ blade.
The advice to go wide for a resaw blade is fine, until you've reached a blade cross-section that's now too much for the limits of your saw to adequately tension. If you're having problems with the fence's stability, then I doubt your saw is built to adequately tension a 1" blade (I know mine isn't!).
Thin resaw blades also tend to deflect backwards (still leaving a flat cut), where others might give you a barrel shaped resaw, that's really not what you want.
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wrote:

Try a _narrower_ blade.
The advice to go wide for a resaw blade is fine, until you've reached a blade cross-section that's now too much for the limits of your saw to adequately tension. If you're having problems with the fence's stability, then I doubt your saw is built to adequately tension a 1" blade (I know mine isn't!).
Thin resaw blades also tend to deflect backwards (still leaving a flat cut), where others might give you a barrel shaped resaw, that's really not what you want.
Althought his blade is actually 3/4" rather than 1" your point is correct. And while you can correctly tension a blade on a saw that does does not mean that the saw can hold all of the other adjustements in check while doing so.
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On 1/9/2010 8:19 PM, GarageWoodworks wrote:

What model Rikon do you have?
--
"Even if your wife is happy but you're unhappy, you're still happier
than you'd be if you were happy and your wife was unhappy." - Red Green
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wrote:

http://www.garagewoodworks.com/Bandsaw.php
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On 1/9/2010 9:36 PM, GarageWoodworks wrote:

You haven't yet mentioned anything about the adjustment of your thrust bearings. Have you checked to make sure both the top and bottom thrust bearings aren't allowing the blade to drift backwards as pressure is applied (and forwards as it is released)? You should start by backing all the bearings (both side and thrust, upper and lower) completely away from the blade, then get the blade to track correctly on the wheels. Assuming the blade is good and sharp (a relatively new 3/4" Woodslicer ought to be *damn* sharp), you should at this point be able to slowly feed small scrap pieces (ones that won't cause too much resistance on the blade) and not have the blade try to drift backwards across the surface of the wheels. If the blade is walking around on the drive wheels, this is going to change the drift angle of the cut. Even without the thrust bearings in place, you should choose a tracking position where the blade isn't prone to walking around, then position the thrust bearings right behind the blade (with a gap not much more than the thickness of a piece of paper) so they will maintain that position as feed pressure is applied. Only then can you reliably adjust the fence for drift angle.
--
See Nad. See Nad go. Go Nad!
To reply, eat the taco.
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wrote:

Thanks Steve. I will give this a try.
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GarageWoodworks wrote:
<Snip>

I've made both a re-saw fence and the single contact pivot fence.
The single point works much better for me.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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1. Drift- yes. The fence moves though. If you push the tail end of the fence it will also felx. POS fence!!! 2. I use a 1" Wood Slicer. (nice blade!!) 3. Yes. The blade doesn't 'cup' the wood, which I use as an indicator of improper tension.
I am either going to build a nice re-saw fence or make a good single- contact pivot fence.
Well I will not argue about the fence.... it is rather light weight. To be sure again, when you free hand with out the fence is it easy to keep it going in a straight line? If you are having to change direction/make direction adjustments while sawing there is something more that is wrong than just the fence.
Now if the fence movement causes you to go off line and free handing is easy to do I would agree that the fence is probably the root of the problem. Have you tried clamping the back end of the fence down to see if that improves the situation?
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On Sat, 09 Jan 2010 18:19:14 -0800, GarageWoodworks wrote:

4. I found that rounding the back of the blade pretty much eliminated drift on my Rikon (14" deluxe). And I haven't seen any flex on the fence, but then I don't see the need to put a great deal of force against it.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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What process did you use to round the back of the blade?
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wrote:

What process did you use to round the back of the blade?
You use use a sharpening stone rubbed up and around the back sides of the blade. Do this with the saw running. There are stones made for this specific purpose but I suspect any fine grain stone will work. The ceramic guides on the Laguna automatically does this.
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On Sun, 10 Jan 2010 11:41:49 -0600, Leon wrote:

Yes, any medium/fine oil/water stone will work. The idea is that during the manufacturing process, a (possibly undetectable) burr is formed on one side thus forcing the blade in the opposite direction.
I've even seenis suggested that if that doesn't work, a little stoning on one side of the teeth might work - I haven't tried that one.
One addition to Leon's response:
Do this *very carefully* with the saw running :-).
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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On 01/10/2010 09:20 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

I'd qualify that by saying "with very minimal pressure". There is no such thing as a "negative" thrust bearing, meaning that there is nothing preventing the pressure you apply from forcing the blade forward on the drive wheels, possibly to the point where it hops right off and soils your underwear.
--
"Even if your wife is happy but you're unhappy, you're still happier
than you'd be if you were happy and your wife was unhappy." - Red Green
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"GarageWoodworks" wrote:

When making free hand cuts, have you also used a reference pin (Same as a starter pin on a router table)?
Lew
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My fence has a pin that can be attached. I should have used it tonight, but forgot I had one. Doh!
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You might try taking a look here for some tips. I saw some of these videos 3-4 years ago but they are very informative with an expected bias towards Laguna BSs. I am not trying to sell you on Laguna but these video's can be very helpful in determining if you are always going to be chasing your tail or not. ;~)
If you go here there are several BS videos. Scroll to the bottom to the video titled The Perfect Cut ResawKing. It is about 20 minutes long but interesting. Another video about the Laguna guides is also quite interesting and helps you to understand what is going on with the guides during operation.
http://www.lagunatools.com/company/video-bandsaw
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