My recent years' "woodworking"...

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I've commented here several times in the past most of what I've gotten done since coming back to family farm hasn't been "fine" woodworking...here are a few pictures from the barn reroof/refurb, there's one of the detail on the old doors; I didn't have one of the replacement in progress but there's one on the south side west end in the "then and now" as well as the haymow small door that were done at that time...I've still not gotten to the big main doors...
<http://s1194.photobucket.com/user/bozarthd/media/OldIsNewAgain_zpsqqsovwdx.jpg.html I'm the one in the overalls standing w/ the roofing hatchet...
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On 11/9/2015 8:48 AM, dpb wrote:

Darn fine looking barn. I wish it was in my back yard and I wish I had a back yard big enough to put it. :~)
I would love to see inside and out pictures when you get done, if that ever really happens. I could see something that big as being a constant work in progress.
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On 11/09/2015 9:56 AM, Leon wrote:

Indeed, which is why I just couldn't stand the thought of letting it go...

It's kinda' bogged down for the time being, I'm working on trying to get another shop area closed in so can have enough heat to do some things like build the windows during cold weather this winter if nothing else...
I'll try to get a few of the inside when I get a chance to pick up some of the litter--I started trying to fill in some of the areas that hadn't had slab floor poured and got sidetracked and things have just gotten worse from there...
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"dpb" wrote:

Now that is by definition, is a never ending project.
Looks like you are gaining on it.
Good luck.
Lew
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On Monday, November 9, 2015 at 9:48:45 AM UTC-5, dpb wrote:

You missed a spot. ;-)
Man, I'm not sure what to say. Spare time project? Full time job?
Nice. Really, really nice.
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On 11/09/2015 10:46 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Only one? :)

Been some of both; we hit it pretty hard while doing the roof and initial work for a couple of years; wasn't much farming going on as was so dry and Dad had put most of our ground into grass...since, have started more work elsewhere on the place and it has (finally!) rained some this year so other priorities have brought progress to pretty much a halt.
Was trying to get restarted plus had an electrical problem w/ the neutral feed which prompted me to post a query to another group while was have brain cramps figuring out what was the issue. Ended up being the connector from the meter pole overhead and had commented there when found it that having the manlift was a boon; another commented in jest that having one was clearly "cheating" which prompted me to post these showing it in action. That got me thinking that at least some folks over here might would like to see the wood parts...

Thanks...have to credit my grandfather with "doing things right!"
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On Monday, November 9, 2015 at 8:48:45 AM UTC-6, dpb wrote:

dx.jpg.html>

That's one heck of a nice (hobby) project. Good for you, to restore it.
Are you near the coast? I suppose a barn with a widow's watch is not too c ommon. That's a nice feature. *With those silos, I'm thinking you're not near the coast, but in middle America. Or is that feature called somethin g else, in your neck of the woods?
Yeah, the view of the interior would be a nice, but considering the size of the barn (multiple "shops" in one building!?), the effort you're putting i nto it and the general view of the surroundings, I'm wondering whatall othe r interesting things you got going on, to warrant all that effort (beyond t he barn restoration)?
To me, those kinds of restorations are almost candidates for a vacation spo t, to visit, see the restoration process, etc.
I can imagine some of those old (past/before.... and recent?) pics hanging in various places, inside, when done.
Hats off to you!!
Sonny
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On 11/9/2015 11:05 AM, Sonny wrote:

Personally, I don't think that's a Widow's Walk or Watch. Most likely what we're looking at is the Central Air Conditioning System. ;)
You can see - in both the before and after photos - the slats that allowed for ventilation.
All barns have roof vents or one sort or another.
Very neat project and nicely done, dpb!
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On 11/09/2015 12:13 PM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

Correct, it's a cupola. The barn loft was built to handle loose hay (the track for the fork(*) is the structure projecting out from below the roof ridge) and the cupola is the outlet for the upflow thru the loft for ventilation. There are eight openings, four each side, along the long walls that were both locations for access and the air ingress locations. There are no windows in the loft except those very high on the east/west ends.

Thanks...
(*) The fella' in the yellow shirt on the scaffold at the corner (same one on the roof where I'm in the lift and we're replacing a section of the bed mould on the upper section) is a guy I found at the local homeless shelter the day before the scaffolding was coming in by truck and I needed some help to unload it. He'd just finished getting mugged while riding a freight back from El Paso and had spent the previous week painting tank batteries for one of the local oilfield service companies but hadn't found anything yet that morning when I called for that day/week. After we got stuff unload, he say "Need somebody to help set it up tomorrow?" and ended up working for me full time for almost two years.
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On 11/09/2015 1:00 PM, dpb wrote:

Oh, and the point of the above was to say he really wanted to see the hay rake work again, but we didn't get that far -- have _not_ opened the big door at all; it, unlike many others, is _NOT_ hinged at the bottom to swing but is in a set of vertical "tracks" built on either side an hangs on a couple of block and tackle ropes. Those are, I'm sure the originals dating back to 1920 or thereabouts(**). I am unwilling to risk removing the blocking underneath the door until those have been replaced; they look to still be in good condition but I'm not going to risk it; the potential damage plus risk to life and limb if that comes down is too great.
(**) I do not know precisely when the barn was finished; the two silos to the east were put up by 1916/17 and the foundation poured for the barn shortly thereafter. But, the WW I rationing on lumber occurred before the lumber was obtained and so the actual construction didn't commence until after Armistice Day (Nov 11, 1918) so know it likely was 1919 when completed. The story goes that the local lumberyard owner is supposed to have called grandpa the day after the armistice was signed and started the conversation with "Andy, we can build that barn now!" :)
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Most city-slickers don't realize the amount of heat generated by drying hay. Easily sufficient to cause a fire if the hay isn't dried and stacked correctly. Thus, one leaves a gap between the barn walls and the hay to allow airflow to extract excess heat while the hay dries and the cupola acts as an outlet.
Of course, drying it before baling it is preferred.
Most of this has been obsoleted by the use of outdoor storage techniques (large round bales, silage socks, etc).
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On 11/09/2015 2:03 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote: ...

For the "mandatory" definition of "preferred"... :)
Once it's baled, if it's not sufficiently dry first about the _best_ one can hope for is some deterioration, far more likely is mold and useless...
The bales are tied too tight for effective drying once done.
We never baled anything until very recently...we had an old twine binder and bound and shocked sorghum for winter feed thru the 70s and 80s if had more than would go in the silos.

Indeed, we've not filled the silos since in the '80s altho it was by far the "most funnest" job of the year; great fall weather by then plus we filled with several neighbors so were big crowds of people around so was as much a party as work...
The south one of the two small silos had been rotated slightly by a small tornado years ago and was standing on only one remaining block on the south foundation. I finally knocked them both down some time after the bulk of these pictures were taken.
--



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Ah, the binder. Not so fond memories of times walking after the binder shocking oats.
Feeding the beast:
http://www.lurndal.org/images/thresh1-300.jpg
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On 11/10/2015 7:58 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

Other than at steam or other old exhibitions never used a stationary thresher but had essentially the same task--we had (actually still have it just no longer used) stationary chopper that had to haul the bundles to...I didn't mind shocking nearly as much as the retrieval; by then the dirt had blown into them, often had to dig out of snow, was invariably cold and windy I seem to recall... :)
--


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We had a chopper that we pulled with the MF180, and a blower to fill the silo. Mainly chopped corn for silage.
Threshing oats was actually enjoyable - it was a multi-neighbor event - two farms shared the binder and threshing machine; we'd set the threshing machine up in the center of the field early in the AM (level it, then grease every one of the hundred+ (at least it seemed that way) zirks) then thresh until dusk. We ran the thresher with a Farmall M, and used either a Farmall B or a Farmall Super C to fetch the shocks.
Baling the resulting pile of straw was a dirty, messy job.
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On 11/10/2015 9:55 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

Yes, we had ensilage cutter (2-row Gehl's) and an Allis blower for silo-filling as well. Too dry here for reliable dryland corn; we used other sorghum feed crops for the ensilage source. Of course, the irrigated folk use corn for ensilage altho they all use trench or surface pile storage any longer; nobody fills an upright any more.
In the olden days, the blower was run off the flat belt w/ an old 'M'; it was converted to direct PTO drive and one of the smaller Deere's used. We went from M to 400 to 560 Farmalls before the 4010 and up Deere transition as the power unit for the chopper.
I broke out the old ensilage blower a couple of years ago to run a bunch of old straw bales thru to break up for use when we regraded the yards around the house to restore drainage. After 60 plus years including the "Dirty 30s" and the 50s in particular when had so much dirt blowing the elevation had increased around the house by as much as 8-10" so it was sitting in a hole when we returned that had caused some foundation settling...drug it back down to more nearly its original level to reestablish drainage for when it does actually rain on occasion...when Dad had his "retirement" sale a few things either didn't sell or were never collected by the buyer; the ensilage blower was one that had no bidders. A-C blowers were the best; they, unlike Gehl or all others had curved blades. Story goes they reached a limit of how high could lift ensilage with flat blades at reasonable rpm and somehow the problem got over to the Allis Chalmers power generation people and a steam turbine engineer designed their blower blades for them.
I've thought if ultimately get the shop really set up to take that blower as the core of a dust collector...and how's that for back "on topic"??? :)
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On 11/10/2015 10:18 AM, dpb wrote:

[snip]

Pretty smooth segue. If you do use that for a dust collector, won't you have to bolt the Powermatic table saw to the floor? I can see where you might have a problem loosing the off cuts as well. ;)
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On 11/10/2015 10:33 AM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

Actually, it probably is too large but there's a smaller one left from the silo unloader that is probably what I'll actually try it with. It's about 24" diam instead of 36 or 42 or whatever the ensilage blower actually is (I really don't know w/o measuring it but it is sizable).
<https://www.google.com/search?q=allis+chalmers+silage+blower&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8 <
http://www.allischalmers.com/forum/uploads/175/blower1.jpg
The first picture on the left of the first link is the one we've got; the next to the right is the later, big brother version...
The second link is a brochure picture showing the curved paddles. It shows unloading out of the back of a truck which was prone to the whole load sliding out at once and slugging the blower. We used a custom-built drag box that Dad designed that let you dump the truck onto it and it was driven by variable-speed hydraulic motor to allow precise control over feed rate to the blower. Once had a third to half the truck unloaded, then could just finish dumping on the drag and head back to the field instead of waiting to finish pushing it all thru the blower before heading back out. Key to not keep the cutter waiting for longer hauls...
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The picture below is similar to the blower we used, although ours was Massey Harris/Ferguson, I believe. The local implement dealer was Massey Ferguson/Hesston (the JD dealer was 30 miles away).
http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c261/pappathopoulosm/Corn%20Silage%202012/IMG_0243.jpg
scott
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On 11/10/2015 2:39 PM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

In _those_ daze, we had Oliver, Minneapolis-Moline, Allis-Chalmers, JI Case, International/Farmall and Massey-Harris as well as Deere dealerships all in town. Now there's only Deere local; nearest red (Case/International) is 60 miles. The Deere dealership also distributes for most of the major implement manufacturers but they're the only factory dealership in the county. They're actually one of if not the largest single-location independent Deere dealerships in the country by sales volume I'm told...
--



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