My Recent Project...

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Puckdropper wrote:

The model railroad has been my recent project, but the woodworking aspects were done a couple of years ago. Track and wiring all done, even have had some operating sessions. Scenery and building will take up time this winter when I'm not doing repairs around the house. Projects in mind include a small box to hold the cremated remains of one of my cats who passed away early this past summer - will be big enough to hold his brother when his time comes. Ideas and plans welcome for this project. Will also do some more wood pens over the winter, and some desk top sets for pens and pencils.
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On 04 Oct 2009 07:39:40 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

My most recent completed project was a video dolly for a friend who is working on a documentary for the East Broad Top Railroad.
The dolly rides on twenty feet of track made out of PVC pipe. The whole thing is portable and breaks down to ride in his mini van. The Dolly frame is ash, because I have a lot of it. the corners are lapped and use jig knobs and tee nuts to hold the frame together. Roller blade wheels mounted on 3/16" angle which is attached to the underside of the long frame members provide for a very smooth ride along the track. I turned pins to connect the pipes together. There are cute little pockets with neoprene liners to hold the tripod. We had a problem with the original design for the light standards. Yes, the lights roll along with the camera. The design has been reworked and should be a lot more stable and not break when we pic the rig up to move it.
It was an interesting project to say the least. I got to work with wood, plastic pipe, and heavy aluminum angle. The holes for the wheels had to be drilled and tapped. Getting the inside nuts on the wheel bolts was a real challenge.
It does roll smoothly, even if I do say so myself.
If anybody is interested, I can post pictures on APBW.
My current project is a storage unit for a friend of my wife's who is into scrapbooking. It is a mobile unit for holding paper, lots of paper, and colored stamp pads. For this project, I had to learn how to do stubbed dados using a router. That is something I had never done before.
The carcass is sitting on the bench with the bottom screwed in place. I dread taking all of the screws out in order to add the glue, but...I will. When the body of the thing is assembled, I have to cut shelves...lots of shelves. The ones for the paper will slide out, the ones for the stamp pads will be captured permanently in the case.
I am using birch plywood and 1/4" luan. I pre finished the insides of the case so that I would not have to try to sand into the corners.
__________________ Bill Waller New Eagle, PA
snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net
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Puckdropper wrote:

I just built a bookcase out of poplar, the smell of the polyurethane has just faded away and some of the sawdust is still on the garage floor. It's 18" wide by 7' tall, built for a narrow space between two pieces of furniture in our office/library. It was supposed to relieve the pressure on the bookcases that wrap around two other walls, but naturally it instantly filled up with books without making much of a dent in the overflow. There was one major error in construction, and although SWMBO said to just go get another piece of poplar and redo the screwed-up side I decided to fix the major blunder in such a way as to be a permanent reminder to me of what not to do in similar situations. Measure twice, cut once only works if you're measuring from the correct %*$#! line in the first place.
As always with a new project I used it as an opportunity to buy a new tool, in this case a Bosch ROS20VSK sander. I was a bit surprised to discover this sander was made in Malaysia, first time I've seen that from Bosch. But it works fine, and the dust collection is amazing. I ended up connecting it to a shop vac since emptying the built-in filter got stale in a hurry. Either way there was almost no dust left on the work, Bosch really got that right. I also like the low profile, seems like it's easier to keep the sander dead-flat as opposed to "pagoda" designs.
I sanded from 80 up to 220 with the ROS, then sanded by hand with 320, left it natural and put on a few coats of Lawrence McFadden clear gel (I love that stuff) sanded with a 320 sponge between coats. It looks pretty good if you ignore where I forgot to use a backing block to prevent tear-out (why couldn't that have happened on the back where it wouldn't matter?) and the little (ahem) layout error that I fixed with strips from a piece of cutoff. Materials were 25' of 11-1/4" poplar, some cutoffs of 1/4" ply for the back which the local hardware store provided for a couple of bucks, LM clear gel poly, four screws and a couple of dozen itty bitty finishing nails to hold the back on. If mistakes are how we learn then I guess I'm smarter now than before I started this project, but it hasn't fallen over and people I'm not married to say it looks good, so maybe it isn't so bad.
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Mine is the ongoing project of bringing the shop back online with a view to making high end chess sets, jewelry boxes, footlockers, etc.
The chess sets are going good, except for the knights, which are going too slowly. I'm having some fun with the footlockers because I'm using wood where I used to use brass hardware. The ebony hinges with brass rods look pretty sharp.
I hope to sell a little bit prior to Christmas and then spend the winter producing for inventory.
Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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Puckdropper wrote:

FWIW, just finished a couple of 'down n' dirty' tambour door "appliance garages" last week that I had promised to a recent kitchen client, and needed to assuage my guilty conscious before any more time passed:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/IMG00115-20090929-1407.jpg
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/IMG00120-20090930-0724.jpg
Being in a hurry, I used Rockler's tambour door mechanism:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/images/IMG00118-20090929-1411.jpg
Worked much better than I anticipated, although that could be because I didn't follow the extremely vague, misleading, poorly written instructions ... Apparently there is only one manufacturer, and plenty of "retailers", but all roads lead to Rockler.
Next time I'll go back to the 'old board and plunge router' method.
Why would any one want an "appliance garage" any how??
--
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I have several projects going. A route bit cabinet, an entertainment center and 3 chairs being repaired.
The "newest" woodshop (house next door) remodel consists of continueing to replace exterior siding and interior (perimeter walls) wall-covering replacement. The other non-perimeter interior walls have been removed and logs have been strategically placed with beams for roof support and the like. Several new floor cabinets/work benches have been made, with wall-attached shelving above. One other floor cabinet/workbench has been cut out, ready for assembly, and the open shelves above it have been built and installed.... face frames not yet installed, though.
The upholstery shop has been 95% complete for at least 10 months. Finish flooring and base boards need to be purchased and installed and I need some better lighting, so new and/or more fixtures need to be installed.
Sonny
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Sonny wrote:

Sounds like interesting and ambitious projects ... got any pictures? Access to apbw? Fire away.
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He sounds very ambitious. Sonny, you're young, aren't you? Yes, pictures, please. I took some pictures of my more modest effort to use up scrap and move the crap. In the "Work in progress" album. tomeshew.spaces.live.com Tom
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D'oh... http://tomeshew.spaces.live.com /
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How much of that tambour door construction do you build? Do you buy the tambours pre made and just install them?
Any chance you have a picture of the inside track of one of those tambours installations or something similar? thanks
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snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote:

Built the "appliance garage" (generally do that as an integral part of a corner wall cabinet, but there was no room for a corner wall cabinet in this kitchen due to a window, and wall cab's being 15" deep, therefore these were built separately).
Bought the "tambour door" itself. Although it is not difficult to make, by the time you factor time and having to buy more canvas then you'll ever need, it is much more cost effective to buy the tambours pre-made. They are generally available in 16, 24, and 36" widths, and for kitchens usually 18" high, and can be cut on the table saw in both width and height to fit the job.
As far as a track mechanism you have a couple of choices - you can route tracks in the side panels (done just using a rectangular board as a guide, which is a fussy process to setup, and you have to do it twice) or you can buy the mechanism you see in the third link ... which apparently only Rockler sells.

Simply a spring loaded dowel and a couple of plastic tracks. What you see in the third link in the original post, is all there is to it.
Notable is that this particular mechanism works very smoothly and opens with less effort that when the tambour door is in routed tracks, IME.
AAMOF, there is really nothing to a "appliance garage" except a three sided face frame for the front and a couple of side panels, therefore they are very light and just the upward pressure of opening the door will generally lift one off the surface if it not tightly fit under the wall cabinet when made after the fact.
These particular spring loaded mechanism do not do that, and can be opened with one finger due to the spring, and are actually very easy to install providing you pay no attention whatsoever to the instructions that come with them.
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"Swingman" wrote

<blinking eyes slowly> Instructions? Instructions? What are these instructions you speak of? Hey, aren't guys suppose to ignore instructions? Something about testosterone.
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Swingman wrote:

To use your words, "Well done.... Impeccable!" :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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"Puckdropper" wrote:

Once was interested in model railroading.
Had the "Model Rail Road that Grows" mag as well as the "101 Track Plans".
Found a neat 4x8 layout that had a double track, double reversing loops and a few spurs in 101.
What I remember was the simplicity of the structure to support everything.
A "L" fabrication front and back with more "L" fabrications at 90 degrees located as needed to provide a place to screw 1x* pieces to support the track and scenery at the necessary elevations.
Made a control box that could be folded under when moving time came.
It was a design I found in one of the mags.
Ring any bells?
Lew
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Sure does. I've got a copy of "Model Railroad that Grows" by Linn H. Wescott in a box somewhere.
The construction method described is referred to as L-girder, and it's got several positive aspects. Not only is it easy to build, but if you purchase dimensional lumber you'd only need a cross cut hand saw and screwdriver to assemble it. It does use a little more wood than "table top" construction, but makes up for it with increased flexibility. (The earth is not flat, why should your model railroad be?)
The control box stand doesn't ring a bell, but I'm sure if I looked hard enough I could find some version or another in one of my older magazines. They used to be full of neat easy projects like that.
Puckdropper
--
"The potential difference between the top and bottom of a tree is the
reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
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"Puckdropper" wrote:

The control panel design was all mine.
Used to be in the biz designing automation control systems and then building the control panels for them.
Before the days of programmable robots, it was known as "Hard Automation".
Got tired of 80 hour work weeks so got into something else.
It had a graphic panel complete with zone control and indicating lights, all built essentially from left overs from other jobs except for the bat handled toggle switches.
Don't the mags have projects like that any more?
I'm certain with Westcott's passing, there have been some major changes in the mags covering model railroading.
Lew
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I've actually seen more good model railroading projects like a control box in an electronics magazine (Nuts and Volts) than I have model railroading magazines. It's a shame, as there's still a lot of people out there that build for the fun of building but their work is of limited interest to the model railroading magazines. (There are exceptions, of course, and I don't keep up with more than about 2 model railroading periodicals so my view of the world might be tilted.)
There have been some major changes in model railroading in the last 30 years. Besides the digital age, there's been a shift from kits to ready to run. Even the "shake the box" kits are being phased out in place of more expensive ready to run stuff.
The control box sounds cool. Zone control and indicator lights sounds like a very necessary thing for a large layout run with conventional power. (Digital Command Control eliminates the need for zone control.)
Puckdropper
--
"The potential difference between the top and bottom of a tree is the
reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
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"Puckdropper" wrote:

More instant gratification, everybody is in the "hurry up and wait" mode.

It was only a 4x8 layout.
The panel was one of those "If you can't dazzle them with brillance, baffle them with bullshit" items.
Lew
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Exactly. We're weirdos here, as we actually like the building process.

You mean something like building a box with random blinking lights that the throttles plug in to and telling everyone "it makes the layout run better" might actually work? It would... um... reduce the ringing induced by solar radiation by filtering 103.3840 hZ signals.
lol
Puckdropper
--
"The potential difference between the top and bottom of a tree is the
reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
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"Puckdropper" wrote:

As long as it looks good in the shower, you have a winner.
Lew
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