My Recent Project...

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Here's a thread for those who just want to talk about their most recent woodworking project. There's only two guidelines: It must be a woodworking project and recent means the saw dust is still fresh.
My recent project is benchwork for my model railroad. The basic frame went together quickly, but the legs are taking some time. Nothing really special about thier construction, it's just two 1x2s glued together for stability and cut/sanded/trimmed smooth.
Puckdropper
--
"The potential difference between the top and bottom of a tree is the
reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

Most recent (current) project is a rustic farm table in maple. Sawdust part is finished, but I still have to ding it up for the rusticisming and apply the finish.
Swmbo likes it enough that she wants one too. Maybe someday....
j
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Puckdropper wrote:

Mine is the Rockler queen size Murphy bed with a two foot wide bookcase on each side. I've rough cut all the material and need to edge band, apply finish, add hardware and assemble. Then there's the matter of a mattress which doesn't appear to be an inexpensive proposition.
- Doug
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it up as I go along. I have the bed frame and have it mounted on the face panels. I inadvertently cut extra openings for legs that won't be there (damn panels switched long and short sides on me when I wasn't looking), so that will call for properly placed "embellishments". For the handles I chose, the leg pieces do NOT need 1/4" holes, but smaller ones, and I need to cut the handle screws down so they properly can be countersunk.
--
Best regards
Han
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My recent project was a stair modification for the back porch of an elderly couple. (Elderly meaning a little older than me) I basically took a bunch of surplus wood they had in their garage and made a new set of steps to fit over the current steps. The new steps cut the height in half, making it much easier for them to go down and up the steps. I will finish it today.
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Puckdropper wrote:

very large Bible. Based on the Thorsen and Bolton plant stands in Lang's book on the subject. Mahogany and shellac.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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Can you post some pic's please?
-Zz
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Zz Yzx wrote:

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Cool, ty
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Puckdropper wrote:

I've been mired up in "restoration" projects, so there's been precious little fresh sawdust. Brought three different antique chairs back from the dead, all with complete disassembly, joint repairs, parts replacements, new finishes, and even new upholstery (which I'm not very good at). Gonna take a quick detour and build a knife block for our newly acquired collection of Wustof kitchen knives (love 'em), then it's off to build a loft bed for my daughter. Pointers to good plans for either of those are welcome*. :-)
(* Yes, I've already spent countless hours slogging through Google looking for ideas, but that's not my idea of fun.)
--
"Even if your wife is happy but you're unhappy, you're still happier
than you'd be if you were happy and your wife was unhappy." - Red Green
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On Sun, 04 Oct 2009 10:35:27 -0500, In newsgroup "rec.woodworking",

Hey Steve,
This may be a little late, but I found a good set of bunk bed plans that can easily be converted to a loft bed, simply by omitting a frame board on the lower bunk. These worked good for me, because they require a minimum of tools and experience, and were very sturdy. If you're still interested, the plans are at: http://bit.ly/8s3xt5
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On Oct 4, 12:39 am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

I just finished some display stands for a Navajo entrepreneur merchandizing her "Medicine of the People" salves and balms. http://medicineofthepeople.net/ I met the lady whose likeness is on the tin. This little project got me to thinking about furthering the mobility of my shop fixtures. That old immobile outfeed table sitting next to my sheetgoods and cutoffs cart is taking up too much space, and is too high when I'm putting longer boards through the planer. Had some good casters laying around unused, and started with bolting them to a 3/4 inch, 2x3 foot hunk of leftover particle board (there's always more invested in hardware than material, at least in my case). The material I have remaining is 2 sheets of 1/2 inch particle board, which I'll double in thickness with glue and screws to make the 24x28 sides of the carcase. A single thickness of 1/2 inch will comprise the back, and a remnant of melamine countertop will cap it off. I'll be building two flush-fitting 6 inch deep drawers to ride on oak runners (or maybe spend the money on a couple of good drawer guides) which will give me a place to put all the crap that's been accumulating on top of the old table, and under those drawers will be an open spot about 15 inches high for the larger crap to languish. The original top with its lazy susan will still be used in a modular fashion for small finishing jobs. Pictures soon. Tom
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On Sun, 04 Oct 2009 07:39:40 +0000, Puckdropper wrote:

So we share two hobbies, not one. I always seem to move before getting to the scenery, so my latest benchwork was built with an eye to portability. I built 4 open grid modules, or "dominoes", each 27" x 66".
I used cedar fence boards planed smooth (1/2"), cut to width, and drilled holes for wire runs and to further reduce weight. Each bare module weighed a little under 4 pounds.
Note that the cedar doesn't hold screws well so I back risers with a small piece of pine.
If I did it again I'd make the grid from 1x3s instead of 1x2s for a little more rigidity.
The modules assemble into two 27" by 11' dioramas back to back. Each thus serves as staging for the other.
Good luck with your layout.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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I've been using the basic domino construction for years. It's a fast method for getting the benchwork completed, and strong too. I could probably build another module in about 3 hours, starting with plywood, 1x4s and 2x4s.
The new layout is L-girder construction, but it's being built in sections no larger than about 25 sq ft. Should I ever need to move it, it will come apart. I've been using dowel rods and screws to hold the various modules together, but now that I think about it a carriage bolt would do exactly the same thing.
I recently discovered something called an insert nut that's perfect for leveling. It's basically a screw with a threaded hole in the center of it that allows a carriage bolt or other machine thread bolt to adjust easily.
Puckdropper
--
"The potential difference between the top and bottom of a tree is the
reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
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On Mon, 05 Oct 2009 01:13:22 +0000, Puckdropper wrote:

That sounds a lot like what used to be called a barrel nut, but that was just a cylinder with the threaded hole crosswise in the center.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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On Sun, 04 Oct 2009 20:44:46 -0500, Larry Blanchard

A "barrel nut" has a female thread in the end of a screwish thingy, sorta like what I understood from Puckdropper's article above.
http://www.beckson.com/bb.html
A cylinder with a crosswise threaded hole is commonly called a "cross dowel".
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page67
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wrote:

The insert nut (or as Rockler's calling them: Threaded inserts) has a screw thread on the outside and machine thread on the inside:
http://www.tradevv.com/TradevvImage/productimages/Insert-nut-A56040.jpg
The barrel nut is smooth on the outside.
Puckdropper
--
"The potential difference between the top and bottom of a tree is the
reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
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On 05 Oct 2009 01:13:22 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Is that some type of metal cross dowel you're talking about? If so, I used them recently on the garden benches I built. They're excellent for construction and hold tightly.
http://www.leevalley.com/hardware/page.aspx?c=1&pD238&cat=3,41306,45375
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snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com wrote in

No, but it would be a good solution for legs made with smaller material. The insert nut requires about 1/2" clearance for itself, plus extra for the threads.
The insert nut is like a barrel nut with teeth on the shaft. It screws in with a hex driver, then a machine thread screws in to the center. Essentially, a recessed hex nut. (I posted a picture later, maybe you haven't seen it yet.)
Puckdropper
--
"The potential difference between the top and bottom of a tree is the
reason why all trees have to be grounded..." -- Bored Borg on
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On 06 Oct 2009 02:56:44 GMT, Puckdropper

Guess, I didn't read your original post closely enough. I've seen them in construct your own furniture pieces, mostly inserted in particle board. Never did trust them to hold properly, although it may be just what I imagine about them, not from practical experience.
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