My Ongoing Workbench Project

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In gluing boards together to make a 30" by 7' top, a few months ago, someone (sorry, I don't recall who) suggested including a threaded steel rod to guarantee strength. I just happend to pass by some today, so I came home with a 72" piece, 3/8" in diameter. It occured to me that I could face "alignment challenges" if try to use more than 1 steel rod, especially if I drill holes that are precisely 3/8". On the other hand, the steel rod (s) may help with alighnment when gluing.
I expect to use 2 nuts on top of a washer at the end of each threaded rod and cover them for the sake of appearence.
Bottom line: Do you advise, 1, 2 or 4 threaded (29") steel rods?
Thanks, Bill
P.S. In case anyone is interested and hasn't seen them, I posted skeletal design diagrams I made with SketchUp at alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking in the thread "Second SketchUp".
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Bill wrote:

I used 3 and was happy with the result. :-D
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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From Google:
Google Groups Home     Cannot find alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
There is no group named alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking.     The link you followed may be broken or misspelled.     Search for alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking
?! Mutha%$^%$ Google.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

--
Froz...

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wrote:

Yeah, I know, or at least I had and then I had forgotten. I had the link to the hosting site bookmarked on my other laptop but I haven't switched that stuff over.
Still, Mutha%$^%$ Google. :)
R
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Here's another link to something like ABPW- http://www.delorie.com/wood/abpw / Thanks, DJ!
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Thanks, Tom.
R
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Just use over sized holes on all the inner pieces and 13/32 for the hole in each outer piece. It is the clamping strength that matters not how tightly it is held internal.

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"Bill" wrote:

first started, the threaded rods become a "belt and suspenders" situation.
I would not install them until after final machining at the drum sander takes place.
For this bench, rods on 18" centers would seem to be about right.
Lew
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Yes, I'm going to follow the glue-up schedule you suggested Lew. The only deviation I was considering was flipping every other board side-ways so that all of the grain runs in the same direction rather than flipping them end-over-end.
I take it that "rods on 18 inch centers" means that the distance between the centers of consecutive rods is about 18"--so, 4 rods approximately equally spaced, with one near near each end. That's what I was considering.
See what you half-started? ; ) I'll surely consider other design details of the bench while I wait for spring. It should probably have a wood workers vise on the right end, at least. Or, I can just get my butt in gear designing a second bench...lol.
I've been learning about patching concrete too, and I'll be grinding concrete, plastering and painting. Then after I apply epoxy to the floor, I'll move in heavy machinery... Just a bunch of "1-day projects". In the meantime, I can find plenty to learn. I have Tage Frid's joinery book from the library, and others, and I'm still waiting on the library for the book that you recommended on boat building and joinery. There's always SketchUp too. It's about time to pack up my new antique planes for the winter as its starting to get cool here in the midwest.
Bill

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"Bill" wrote:

This top will be your basic Sherman Tank.
I wouldn't sweat grain orientation.
A flying red horse won't see the grain orientation from a 1,000 ft.

That's why I left<G>.
What is your part of the "Midwest"?
Lew
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Okay, now lets consider that we have the 7' by 30" beast of a bench top. Since it is going to be made from glued 2" by 8" SYP lumber, ripped in half, it will still be over 3" thick after it has visited the drum sander.
What sort of VISES should we put on this? 7" quick-release for a front vise? bigger?
Tail-vises (screws?) seem tougher. Is this benchtop going to maintain the tolerances for which this makes sense?
Frankly, getting these installed properly seems like a challenge, since accuracy is do important.
I've been trying to "read-up" on vises but it tain't easy. Some of them come with no screws or directions too, from what I've read. I should probably go back to "The Workbench Book"...
I'm open for suggestions though. I'm finding that building a "small factory" isn't too easy--and not too cheap either! ; )
Thanks, Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

Yes and Yes.
Funny you should ask.
The WoodSmithShop just built a work bench, mounted a vice, then added dog holes.
http://www.woodsmithshop.com /
Check the schedule in your area.
It may still be running.
Lew
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On Fri, 6 Nov 2009 01:36:01 -0500, the infamous "Bill"

Yeah, and adorn it with hardwood inserts. Once you get woodworking, you'll determine if you need a large front vise after all.

Sure. Just put a coat of finish on all surfaces of the top, top and bottom. That will help ensure that it doesn't warp on you.
Um, vises don't really maintain tolerances, per se. They're work holders. Just make sure they're installed in-plane and are solid.

Yes and no. You can work with a skewed vise, butcha better be aware that it is skewed. Just take your time and check your work with squares. It just takes time.

Very good idea.

Cha CHING! You got that right. But lots of us cheapas^H^H^H^H^H^H^Hfrugal woodworkers have accomplished things. Find out where you can skimp on tools to save up for the expensive ones. I buy Harbor Freight bar clamps for an eighth of what Jorgy wants, and IMNSHO, they're just as usable.
Hang in there, Bill. It gets easier once you get over the sticker shocks. Use your creativeness to overcome that.
-- "To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical." -- Thomas Jefferson
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There are some strategies you can adopt to reduce the cost of materials. Mine is buying at auctions, - liquidations, deceased estates, surplus inventory, etc. Using a few basic strategies, it's often possible to buy for a fraction of retail cost. It has served me very well. My last lumber purchase was about 5 years ago, - I ended up with over 6 tons of structural pine and Jarrah for about AUD$300. (That would have been about US$180 back then.) That's way less than firewood price. Still got about 2 years supply left. My advice to those new to auction buying is as follows: 1/. Attend at least 2 or 3 auctions without buying. This gives you a better idea of how they are conducted and a general idea of the prices being fetched. 2/. When you do feel confident enough to bid, make sure you have established a maximum amount that you are prepared to go to. Stick to that. Absolutely! If your limits are below the market, revise them and wait for the next auction. Never change them while the auction is in progress. 3/. Research. Know what you are bidding on. Once it is knocked down to you, you have no recourse. (That's how it operates here in Oz, don't know about where you are.) I once bid on some cans of paint that I had no intention of buying, but they were so cheap I put my hand up. There were about ten 4 litre cans of white paint in a stack. I got them for $1 each. When I went to collect them, I found they were a display sample and there was over 100 cans of the stuff! It was all listed in the catalogue but I hadn't researched it. (Paint anyone?) 4/. Be prepared to bid against the dealers, - they are buying to re-sell and you are competing with them. This means you are going to be buying in bulk, but in general, very cheaply. The average Mom and Pop can't handle the bigger lots, so it's basically you and the dealers. They basically set the prices. Your task is to make a nuisance of yourself. Make no secret of the fact that you are merely after one or two bulk lots and then you will be satisfied. If a lot is within your price range, make a bid just before it is knocked down. One bid only. If a dealer really wants it, he will have to raise his bid. Do this with any lot that falls within your parameters. This will get the attention of the dealers. If you don't end up with anything, you will have cost the trade bidders the price of 2 bids (Yours and theirs that they were forced to increase.) Over time, chances are that they will get annoyed enough to let you have a couple of lots just to see what you will do. Then you can go away happy. (This might take an auction or two to achieve.) 5/. Be prepared to handle what you have bought. How will you transport it? Where will you store it? Have you got the workshop facilities to turn it into what you want? 6/. Most important of all, - have a really good story to tell your wife as to why you have just arrived home with half a lumber yard in tow. : )
diggerop
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My wife will be happy as long as I don't want to talk about it. When we go to Lowes, Menards, Harbor Freight, she waits in the car with a book. Did I mention she doesn't want to talk about it?--no matter how great a deal it was, or what I want to do with it. I could be planning to build an ark for God, wouldn't matter. ; )
Bill
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wrote:

Sound like a fine wife... just as long as she doesn't do the same thing to you.
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I advise 0 threaded rods. They are not needed and don't add anything. If you need to align the pieces, use cauls.
Luigi
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"Luigi Zanasi" wrote:
I advise 0 threaded rods. They are not needed and don't add anything.
Agreed.

Follow my glue up schedule, cauls won't be req'd.
Lew
Luigi
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