My new CHERRY dining table is finished!

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I answered this one:
http://www.pompy.com/craftsmanship/materials/woods/cherry/
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"stoutman" wrote...

Pitch pockets, afaik, are little deposits of sap and minerals. They, and pin knots, are considered acceptable on fine cherry furniture; sapwood, of course, is not.

It will definately darken much more quickly on the window end. I would be obsessive about turning it every few days for a couple of months, and definately wouldn't leave anything sitting on the top for a few months. A sheet of paper sitting on the top in the sun for two days will leave a very noticable tan line! Until the table darkens - the color will become more stable and darken much more slowly after a few months in the sunny window.
Enjoy!
-- Timothy Juvenal www.rude-tone.com/work.htm
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Hambone Slim wrote:

Unless there is enough extra sap in the spots to make them gooey I'd call them mineral spots and agree that they add character.
--

FF


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I don't know that I agree with your statement on sapwood. Take a look at this link http://www.lf.org/artisansgallery/ag.html
IIRC, this piece is cherry, and I think effective use was made of the contrast between heartwood and sapwood.
todd
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"todd" wrote...

I agree with you; that piece is really nice. I've done similar things using 50% heartwood & 50% sapwood with walnut, and the contrast between the light and dark was pleasing to me.
Around these parts, I get called on to make mostly traditional pieces, and in those cases the sapwood wouldn't be appropriate.
Other side of the coin, a lot of folks in this area like really dark cordovan stains on cherry. In these cases you can't see the sapwood anyway; it stains up and looks just like the rest of the piece.
In other words, never use cherry sapwood unless you feel like it. >8^)
-- Timothy Juvenal www.rude-tone.com/work.htm
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Very nice. Looks solid with multi generational potential. You can add it to the stuff the kids will fight over some day.
Frank
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Looks good. I would call it Shaker. Can we assume that the fastentening method of the top to approns allows for expansion.
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Thank you! Definitely. I use z-shaped table top fasteners from Rockler
--
Stoutman
http://www.garagewoodworks.com
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A Shaker table would be more likely to have round legs.
Pure Mission, would show more through tenons... even pegged ones. The skirt could have had a slight arch to it and still be valid as 'Mission'.
IF I had to call it anything, I would call it Metropolitan.
There are so many 'melds' of the above styles that the most important aspect survives.. and that is simplicity. Clean lines.
Then again... Mission is in the eye of the beholder?
r
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Looks good. How did you plane/sand the top after the glue up? Someone asked me to repair a table they had damaged with a candle by ripping out the damaged part and putting in new boards. I declined because I had no way of getting a perfectly flat surface afterwards; too darn big. What did you do?
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Thank you!

I didn't glue all eight boards at one time. I glued the inner four boards first and the next day I glued on the two outer boards on each side for a total of eight. So only four boards were glued at each time. I think this dramatically simplified my glue-up. After each glue up, I scraped then sanded. With the exception of a few divots from scraping to long in one spot : ( she is very flat. The top rests on the aprons nicely all the way around.

I don't think (although I am still a neophyte at this) you need a flat surface. If all your joints are at 90 degrees, with good even clamping pressure it should come out flat. My top during both glue-ups was resting on bar clamps on the bottom, with bar clamps also spanning accross the top.

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On Thu, 04 May 2006 23:33:01 GMT, stoutman wrote:

Really nice! Some day, I would like to do something like that too. I hope mine turns out a well as yours did.
--
Art


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Thank you!

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