My first woodworking bench - suggested features?

So I've finally got every tool I need (for now) with the acquisition of my table saw. My first project is going to be a mobile workbench. Already have the bench, but currently it has a melamine top which is kinda beat up. I have a buncha 3"x6" white oak in 6 to 7 foot lengths that were taken out of our timberframe when we remodeled.
Anyhoo, I have a vise and plan for bench dogs. I will not be putting a tray into it as I really don't do a lotta hand work.
Any other suggestions?
D'ohBoy
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D'ohBoy wrote:

have a mobile workbench that is the same height as my table saw. It can be used as a run out table when sawing long pieced of lumber. Or it can be used as a staging area when making a lot of similar cuts as when making picture frames.
If we ever find our selves in one place for an extended length of time I am considering making several additional mobile units, so the arrangement can be truly customized to the project on which I am working.
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Keith nuttle wrote:

rollers have been lowered. There is a slight difference.
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On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 07:07:46 -0700, D'ohBoy wrote:

I saw an article in a magazine recently where someone used t-tracks in a bench instead of dogholes. Looked like a good idea to me.
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Larry Blanchard wrote:

I saw that too. I wondered why they just didn't drop the "odd shape holders" into the dog holes?
The whole idea didn't seem to offer much that round dogs don't, in the context offered.
I can see t-track being useful to hold things down, but can't imagine the implements holding very well against a vise. It seems to me that the aluminum could be easily deformed.
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B A R R Y wrote:

You haven't said what you plan to do at your bench. Most of my work is done with power tools, and my bench is most commonly used for tool maintenance.
At one point I built a tilting panel cart to make it easier to move stuff around the shop. I still use it that way, but it's actually more used as an assembly bench. There're a couple of photos at http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/PanelCart/ - and strangely enough, one of the things that make it most useful is that it /doesn't/ have a solid top. I built it so that the top of the aluminum 'slides' are exactly even with the bed of one of my machines.
I also found it convenient to have a number of portable mini-benches - so I combined a sturdy, flat work surface and wobble-proof sawhorse into the stackable critter at http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/Projects/SawHorse /

It would seem that way to me, but that hasn't happened to me yet (and I've put some /serious/ stress on mine).
I've built a number of my own clamps and fixtures for use with t-track, and I like that I can use fixtures originally built for one setup to fill an unforseen need on a different setup - and I like that the fixtures are inexpensive and easy to make. The only photos I have on the web site currently are at http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/RadialArmSaw/ - but you might find it interesting that my adjustable fence/stops and the leg levelers were all cut from the same 6' piece of aluminum. :-)
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Morris Dovey wrote:

Argh! I screwed up the URL and tried to post a correction right afterward - and just noticed that the correction didn't appear. It's corrected in the text above and in my sig below. Sorry.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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More ideas and considerations than you probably want
Bugbear's compendium
http://www.geocities.com/plybench/bench.html
Tim Cileski's Workbenchdesign
http://www.workbenchdesign.net /
Figure on spending several hours - at least - on each site.
charlie b
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extends full width/length of the bench and is about ten inches below the bottom of the bench top. When working on a project on the bench, I can use the entire surface and stash tools under the bench while working. It is an incredible time saver and organizer. It doesn't take care of everything, but it does reduce the clutter.
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On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 14:35:30 -0400, Lee Michaels wrote:

You're right. I did the same and it's really handy. It's also nice to be able to run bolts through the dogholes and tighten from underneath to hold a grinder, scroll saw, planer, etc. to the bench.
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Or mounting holes purpose-drilled for the item being mounted. And slightly off-topic--don't forget wing-nuts. In 5/15" or 3/8" size, they provide enough leverage for temporary mounting of something on the bench, and make installation and removal much easier.
For me, this makes a mechanic's vise readily accessible without sacrificing part of my flat surface.
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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Thanks to all for the valuable input. Already had some drawers and storage in mind for underneath the bench. The addition of dog holes that accommodate the attachment of my planer and other portable items (cms, etc....) is a great suggestion!
Thanks again! D'ohBoy
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Good suggestion. Two more "learn from my mistakes" suggestions:
Keep the shelf and stretchers high enough for easy access to the floor under the bench. Mine is too low making it next to impossible to clean, or to find dropped items that roll under the bench.
Provide overhang on all sides so that you can clamp to the top rather than having to include the skirt depth in your clamping.
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I'm new to WW (but not "new" - six grand kids). So, I don"t feel qualified to answer most questions here. But, I am in the first bench phase of my new hobby and thought I would share what I went through.
I looked at a lot of pictures, plans, etc. I love those big heavy hard wood benches with all the bells and whistles. I knew I had to get away from the plywood on sawhorses "bench", but what did I need? I came to the conclusion that spending a lot of money and time on some ultimate bench was not going to happen on the first try. I came across a plan in WOOD magazine (issue163 june/july 2005). Their description was "Build a rock-solid, low-cost workbench". Perfect! If it dosen't work out or I move up, I can still put it to some other use.
I built the basic bench with a solid core door top. The only thing extra I did was to mill the two bys in the frame. I attached a wood vise from the BORG and goodby sawhorses.
Since building I have added a couple of drawers, a second larger quick release vise, and a shelf under one side of the bench top. I use both vises. I find the shelf very handy to keep things at hand, but not clutter the bench top. The drawers are full.
Originally I thought I wanted casters. However, I haven't had a time where I wanted to move the bench. I could still put them on but I'm not sure I would like them as it seems that the bench would be more apt to slide. Maybe someone reading this will have experience with casters and will comment.
My next add-ons will be more drawers. I also am considering adding feet. These two will add weight and surface contact with the floor. I always assumed that I would drill holes for the dogs. Haven't got around to it. Right now I get by with clamping a board to the benchtop and dogs in the vises.
Bob
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On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 16:37:22 -0700, rjdankert wrote:

I put casters in the bottom of each leg. In normal use, the bench sets on a piece of 4x4 at each end so the casters are off the ground. Doesn't move even when handplaning. To move it I just jack or lever up each and and remove the 4x4s.
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