Multifunction/oscillating pwr tool

Are the attachments [blades etc] on these tools interchangeable between brands?
For the non pro occasional user is the HF worth the money or should one pony up more for a name brand?
Thanks
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as underneath my scribble :

cheapest versions come without the carbide tools as these are the most expensive attachments, also probably the most useful! So do your sums. To answer the question about interchangeability, the answer is that most of them are, but not all, so be very careful on your multitool original purchase that the tools are compatible with most Fein(ie. Multimaster), Makiya, Taskforce etc. brands - Then you get the best choice of replacement compatible attachments. Beware thare are two different sizes of triangular sanding tools and sheets. Useful list not guaranteed, copied from an ebay seller:

four pins and the tools have multi positional slots to match. C+
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wrote

Dayum, do all these makes/mfr's actually make their own multitool, or are some/most simply putting their label on a generic unit?
--
EA




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Existential Angst wrote:

Most are rebadged. Once they started catching on everybody started selling them.
Fein, Dremel, Milwaukee, Bosch are different, Most of the rest are the same basic tool with cosmetic changes.
The only thing I have noticed is the high dollar tools are a bit quieter in use.
--
Steve W.

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Steve W. wrote:

into a local DIY store in the UK once and out of interest looked at the power tools and they had the shop brand "Homebase", Challenge brand, and Bosch. The store brand and Challenge looked identical in all details apart from the decals and the colour of the mouldings so I assumed came from the same maker in China with a livery to suit the vendor.
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David Billington wrote:

I have wondered who it was who decided to take a bone saw and turn it into a homeowner tool....
--
Steve W.

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Me, but the cast saw version, though I didn't market the idea.... LOL.
*Bone and cast saws were originally made by Styker. *A scroll saw has a similar cutting action and I'm surprised someone didn't think, long ago, of joining the two ideas. I've also wondered if the dust collector/vacuum cleaner accessory, long ago available for cast saws, pre-empted the woodshop/tool dust collector.
When our cast saw began to "malfunction", we replaced it with a new one. I took the old saw home and "repaired" it and have used it fairly often, ever since. Because of the malfunction, it made more noise, than before, and though it still worked, in the office, the increased noise factor, for the patients, contributed to our decision to replace it.
I've used this old saw long before similar saws came on the market for woodworking. Even in the office, we would cut through broom/mop sticks, which were used as bracing across the leg aspects of body casts, so the leg aspects wouldn't break apart/separate. In order to remove the body cast, the stick bracing had to be cut, also. *Any wood support would work, but broom or mop sticks were most convenient and cheap. A good sturdy wood brace, across a patient's legs, rather than making one using plaster of paris (cast material), also facilitated having a good grip/handle, to assist in moving the patient, when need be. A plaster made bracing would break more easily... not a good thing for a patient in a body cast!
My cast saw needs a new washer. The old worn one allows the nut, holding the blade secure, to loosen, hence the blade doesn't vibrate, to make the cut, anymore.
I don't know if any of today's woodworking blades are teflon coated, but cast saw blades are teflon coated to prevent heat buildup, especially when cutting today's fiberglass casts. Since I have the cast saw, I've never looked into buying a multi tool or checking out the blades. I have wondered if the straight blades would fit this cast saw. There have been cuts, I've made, where a straight blade would have been more convenient, than the round cast saw blade. I only have the round cast saw blades. Bone saws, used in surgery, do have various shaped blades.
Sonny
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wrote as underneath :

This might well be right, my el cheapo is noisy as hell but mostly its' only used when no other tool will do the job, but ear protection would get over the problem fine for those times it is used if this was a real problem. Havnt' used any big ticket version - so nothing to compare with.
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I gave the Bosch a try and like it a whole lot more than the HF version. Soft start, reduced vibration, and reduced noise are all very much appreciated.
The HF version is worth buying first, then if you find you use the tool on a regular basis it's worth upgrading to one of the better ones. Keep the HF version or "donate" it to someplace it would be useful. Mine is at the local model railroad club, just in case it's needed. Got used a coupla weeks ago, too.
Oh btw, I found a new use for it. That "grout" blade that's completely smooth cuts through foam very nicely. It doesn't leave a bunch of staticy foam dust like the searated edge blades do.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 29 Sep 2012 09:58:23 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote as underneath :
snip

C+
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    Back when I got mine (RIGID brand), Home Depot had a display showing that and other similar ones which they also sold (and the other accessory heads which come with the tool) so you can test them on real wood. This was about a month before Christmas a couple of years ago. You might ask whether your local Home Depot will have a similar comparison display set up, so you can make up your own mind. Among other heads for the RIGID were a right angle electric drill, and one which works as a hammer to drive in reasonable sized nails in awkward locations where you can't get proper access to swing a proper hammer. I used it, among other things, for driving captive nails affixed to the plastic outlet/switch boxes when the next stud over was too close.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 9/30/2012 6:01 PM, DoN. Nichols wrote:

I've been interested in the proliferation of these tools for quite some time. I can think of a couple of attachments that might get traction in the market. My view so far is that they aren't quite there yet. What do you think?
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    [ ... ]

    Well ... the fact that this one has separate motor and heads allows for a bit more variety than something which is directly generating an oscillatory motion. The heads which I have are the default one (oscillatory saw/sander), the confined space hammer, and the electric drill head.
    It is the JobMax series, and includes a 3/8" drive ratchet head, the "multi-tool" (the vibratory tool), an impact driver head, and the 3/8" right angle drill head. They even have a combo kit having all of these above, plus the charger.
    Also listed (if you click on "show me all the things you find") there is a jig-saw head and the hammer head
    The Jobmax tools have the trigger/speed control and the forward/reverse switch on the motor module, and the heads can click onto it in four different orientations, so you can do things like drill towards yourself or drive nails towards yourself quite comfortably.
    I did not get several of the options, as I did not see a need for them. At this point, I may go back for some of these, as I don't know how many things will turn out to still work after the fire. But they also have a 1/2" drill/screwdriver (not another head for this, but a different series) which puts out enough torque so you really *need* the extra handle. In particular, the ancient B&D jigsaw (they called it a "saber saw" back in 1957 or so. :-)
    And the 1/2" drill/screwdriver still works after coming out of the shop *after* the fire. Just a little rust on the drill chuck jaws. Same for the spare battery and the charger.
    So -- I am pretty pleased with what I got. But I don't know what other brands are like -- but I know that I have been displeased with earlier battery powered drills because the batteries tend to discharge between uses, while both of these series use a Lithium-Ion battery pack -- quick to charge, and holds the charge for along time.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 10/1/2012 7:47 PM, DoN. Nichols wrote:

I'll keep the project in mind and it might work it's way to the front burner some day. ...lots of stuff should reach the front burner.
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