Multi-joint

http://i.imgur.com/Lcn5sUV.gifv
Pretty nifty.
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On 8/5/2015 4:08 PM, Michael wrote:

yes, pretty cool. But it would be easy to screw up your assembly and glue it the wrong way :-(
--
Jeff

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Why would you glue a joint like that?
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 8/5/2015 4:41 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

With all those glue surfaces it should be extremely strong.
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It would be nice to have a cut sequence. Is it computer cut only or how the joints are made.
Martin
On 8/5/2015 5:37 PM, Leon wrote:

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If the glue is stronger than the wood, more surface area doesn't help. I wouldn't think it would take anything near that much surface area for the above to be true.
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On 8/5/2015 7:26 PM, krw wrote:

Certainly it helps, it keeps the joint from sliding apart. Jeez!
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On 8/7/2015 9:02 AM, Leon wrote:

And just to add to that. The less glue on the surface, the more the area that does have glue has to support the rest of the joint. Read that as a small portion of the wood surface at the glue can break and the joint becomes loose. More glue surface and you have more more wood working at the joint.
Which brings up the question, if you are gluing a panel edge to another panel face do you use a drop of glue or the entire mating surface?
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I see your point but you've hogged out half of the wood, too. The "neck" (for lack of a better word) may not be as strong as another type of joint.
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On 8/7/2015 6:59 PM, krw wrote:

That is entirely possible but the beauty to the joint is that it can be cut the same way and used in multiple directions/orientations. Probably totally way too much trouble but interesting.
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Not after the glue dries! ;-)

Sure. I'd like to see what it took to make.
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On 8/5/2015 4:08 PM, Michael wrote:

How is it cut?
All I can find is https://instagram.com/p/tQwU-_xEZa/
Claims cut with saw and plane, shows how the cuts are marked out.
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That is beautiful. I would love to see a step by step on how that is cut.
On Saturday, August 8, 2015 at 11:28:54 AM UTC-5, Larry Kraus wrote:

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On Wed, 5 Aug 2015 13:08:21 -0700 (PDT)

it is a beautiful joint done by a japanese artisan
if you have the chance check out a show called artisan x designer pronounced artisan times designer
they share a significant amount of detail about their craft
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