moving South

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Hi all,
I'm planning to move from Nebraska to Texas in the near future and have a couple of questions about heat and humidity in the shop. First, are there special precautions or maintenance regimens to protect machinery? How does one handle wood movement if furniture is constructed in a shop without air conditioning and then moved to the air conditioned home where it will live?
Thanks in advance...
Mike Lester
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"news.central.cox.net" wrote in message

You're in for a big surprise ... starting with the fact that Texas is so big as to make answering your question futile without you being more specific as _where_ in the Texas?
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Swingman wrote:

the gulf and 70 miles east of Houston. I really can't say I have problems with wood movement. I can tell you you need to invest in a can of topcoat or a can of Johnson's wax for your cast iron.
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Is it raining at your house too?
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"Leon" wrote in message

Just for the past month ... the shop is like a steam bath during the day. It's tolerable if I can keep it open, but if I have to close it to go somewhere (which is ten times a day here lately), by the time I get back, forget about it.
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Yes us too although we have not had many inches as the rest of the city . I suspect 5-6" this month.
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There are two types of air conditioning in Texas. On the gulf coast, the humidity can get a bit high, so conventional A/C is used. In central Texas, west Texas and the panhandle, the humidity is sufficiently low to use a "swamp cooler" that blows air over watersoaked fiber mats. It seldom freezes south of Huntsville, but ice and snow can be found on I35 around the Red river and going north into OK. If you get into Dalhart in the Texas panhandle, it can be a might brisk at 10-16 degrees in the winter. Now, which of the 254 counties in Texas will be your new destination?

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"Thomas Kendrick" wrote in message

Yep... I was in Snyder, up in Scurry County, a few weeks back and one evening it got plumb brisk for June. Got a blast-from-the-past in how the folks greet you ... Welcome to Scurry County", not "Welcome to Snyder" ... as in most of them live out on the wide open spaces thereabouts, far removed from the town.
And what a great drive ... 290 from Houston to Brenham, then 36, ALL the way to Abilene. Heart O' Texas drive, for sure.
Saw a still functioning drive-in movie outside of Gatesville, and you'll find that Hamilton, it not one of the prettiest, is still one of those old fashion towns that looks like Texas used to look before freeways and absentee land ownership.
It was most definitely a pause from city life that refreshed.
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Here in Austin, ice on the roads can be a problem. But the last couple years, not much ice. Texas has five seasons; Dec. & Jan. winter Feb. Mar. April, spring May & June are summer July & August is super summer Sept. & Oct. back to summer Nov. is fall
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No, Texas has 2 seasons. ;~) Summer and Christmas. LOL
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"Leon" wrote in message

... and they usually coincide.
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Swingman wrote:

Not in N TX, they don't... :)
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"Duane Bozarth" wrote in message

Depends upon what you call "N. Texas" ... to a Texan, that would be up around the Dallas/FW, Denton area, and the weather there is often similar to Houston's.
Now the Texas Panhandle is a different story all together. Those barbed wire fences between the Texas Panhandle and your part of the country doesn't hold back much of that Canadian Christmas wind.
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Swingman wrote:

That also depends on which part of TX "Texan" you're talking about...up here in the Panhandle, the two are pretty much synonyms--it's a long ways to the Red River country down there... :)
I recall as a kid going to grandparents' in "The Valley" (they farmed/dairy'ed between McAllen and Pharr) -- it was <45 min from the house out of KS, across the OK panhandle and into TX -- "when do we get to <Gfandma's???" started soon thereafter... :)
And, invariably, it would be a wet, cloudy spell and we'd be freezin' to death in the damp where we would have been comfortable at 30 degrees colder in the dry...
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Rick Samuel wrote:

winter, and road construction.     j4
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In metro Chicago, drivers insist that there are only two seasons. 1) construction season 2) pot-hole season
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I live in Houston and basically do not worry with wood movement. Humidity varies from about 35% when it is reeeeeel dry to 100% . No problems moving from the open shop to a controlled encironment. I use TopCote a couple of times a year on the iron surfaces and have no rust.
That said there are parts of Texas that are only 300 miles south of Nebraska and parts of Texas are way farther south than the "Deep South" slightly north of the Keys in Florida.
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Mike,
I depends on where in Texas you are moving to. I live in the DFW metro, and I don't have AC in my garage/shop.
I don't have any problems with my tools rusting. Basically wax the iron a couple times a year - thats all I do and I don't have rust. East Texas (east of what I call 'the pine tree line') gets more rain, but I don't think its significantly more humid (but I don't live there so I may be wrong - ask one who lives there). The gulf coast is more humid on average, but again, I don't think its more of a problem then any other costal area. West Texas is very dry so you don't have any worries there. Again, I speak for DFW only though.
AC does dry the air inside, but most of Texas is pretty dry anyway so the difference is a few percent. Second, the weather changes so fast that the impact of a humid spring followed by a dry summer is minimized to a certain extent. We don't have long months of humidity followed by long months of dryness - its much more dynamic.
Hot, you bet. In DFW we have had a humid spell, but its between hot and dry spells. In fact, we have a heat advisory in effect for the next several days. Dry and highs in the upper 90's/lower 100's.
I tell everyone that like the North, Texas has 3 tough months. Not Jan/Feb/Mar but instead June/July/Aug. I work in the shop pretty much year 'round, but in those 3 summer months, its early in the morning or late at night - whichever the kids decide is better for them :) That said 95 degrees is my limit so little gets done :( until it cools off for real in late Sept. Its rarely below 35 in the winter so I work anytime I like then.
Finally I'll say this - as long as you follow the basic "rules" of wood movement, you'll be fine. Unfortunately I have not built every piece of furniture in my house. My bedroom was made in China <blush> and I have never had a problem, my dining room was made in Vermont (or wherever Ethan Allen is made) no problems there. You know, we do have real wood down here. We even have tall buldings downtown! Cars, well thats another story, I ride my horse to work everyday. I don't know about the WW in the local saloon though, they made the bar out of wood from tumbleweeds.
:)
(in case you didn't see it)
:)
Sorry, could resist the jab. When you get here, welcome to Texas. Matt
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Oops! Yes, I should have been more specific about location. ;) I will be moving to Magnolia, a small town about an hour and a half north of Houston. Plenty humid. Sounds like I shouldn't have problems if I follow my usual practices.
Thanks!
Mike L.

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High humidity all the time. Not a breath of breeze. A little cool in the winter. Fairly close to the Texas Renaissance Festival in Plantersville (http://www.texrenfest.com /). Piney woods and acidic soil. Hurricanes now and then. Welcome to Texas.
On Sat, 23 Jul 2005 11:09:54 -0500, "news.central.cox.net"

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