Moving a shop

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None of them is what I would classify as real heavy, I would suggest that a heavy duty trailer is a better bet than a truck, one they are lower and usually have a ramp, two unless it's a BIG truck they probably have a higher load capacity.
For this type of exercise you need a bunch of racheting cargo straps, Lowes, BORG any of those have them. Cross tie them diagonally across the vehicle, if possible anchor to chassis members.
For this type of job I would use a pallet jack, think I've seen them for hire at places like Budget, I move things enough that I picked one up for $50. A dolly is really two high and not wide enough to be stable. You need some 2x4s for those items that don't span the forks of the pallet jack and use your straps while you are manouvering things around on the jack.
You probably do less damage moving the BS and DP upright, providing they're properly braced high enough with the rachet clamps they're not going anywhere you don't want.
Bernard R
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Be sure to remove the fence and table on the jointer. It's very tempting to pick up the jointer by having two guys grab an end of the table. This is a big no-no. The weight in the middle pulling down from the table ends could result in a twisted or warped table.
Secure the table to some plywood and carry it that way so the whole table is supported. Same for the fence.
Heavy duty stretch wrap is excellent for tying the fence and table to the plywood. It is available at most any moving supply store. Also great for bundling boards.
Cape Cod Bob Visit my web site at http://home.comcast.net/~bobmethelis
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Cape Cod Bob responds:

Not good.

We usually just use the stretch wrap (I hated this stuff when it first came out, but won't be without it now) to keep a couple 4' or so 2x4s up close under the table. Your idea may be better, as with mine, it's hard to get through a standard door. With a large door, though, just snug the 2x4s up, and pick up 2x4 ends (2 people, of course). And if you're carrying Big Bertha, your 12" jointer, 4 people.
Charlie Self "It is not strange... to mistake change for progress." Millard Fillmore
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) bellowed forth with this wisdom for all to hear:

OR WORSE! I didn't know about the problem this can cause when I moved, and now I have a jointer with a broken dovetail on the infeed table. I don't think I'll ever get it to work properly again.
If I had known better, I'd have prevented the moving gorillas from toting my jointer by the table ends, and for SURE I'd have inspected every piece of machinery intensely before signing off on the moving papers.
Joe
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I originally wrote:

Thanks to everyone who replied. As I stated before, I have almost no experience in this area...so another question:
What does removing the table from the jointer mean? I was planning on removing the fence and the jointer from the base. Is it possible/easy to remove the infeed/outfeed tables? It's a Delta 8" Professional model.
For the unisaw, I'm going to remove the extension table, the fence rails, and I think the cast iron wings. I assume this is straightforward, and I can get access to the current shop before the actual move date to break things down. Btw, how much will the cast iron wings weigh? It's a Delta Platinum Edition Unisaw w/ Bessy fence.
Again, thanks to everyone for their suggestions. After thinking through my choices, I am looking at renting a Ryder type truck w/ lift gate.
Todd Mummert
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Check with Uhaul as well Todd. I was sitting on the porch drinking my morning coffee this morning and one of their vans went by, too fast to read it for sure, but I think it said $29.95 per day.
-- Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com/woodshop

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It either says as low as $29.95 a day or doesn't mention per day at all.
On weekends and around the 1st of the month, that $29.95 only gets you half a day rental. During the week mid month they will give you a full day for $29.95 as demand is much less.
I would rent from anyone besides Uhaul. They charge more but they have better trucks. I've never rented a Uhaul I would drive more than 20 miles. The Uhaul trucks I've rented were pretty much ready for the scrap yard.
Brian Elfert
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Me too, except maybe for a really basic, crosstown move of household items. The only advantage Uhaul has over anyone else is they are easy to find.
UHaul kills you on the mileage, and nickle and dime crap. Also, I haven't seen a lift gate equipped UHaul in 15 years, only trucks with ramps. The $29.95 is a come-on. The last time I tried to rent from Uhaul, the truck never came back from the night before, so they left me in the cold. Where was the truck? Apparently Uhaul's local rates are much better than one-way, so scumballs rent the truck and ditch it somewhere after they're done. The Uhaul employee told me this happens on a pretty regular basis.
On the other hand, Ryder, Penske, Edart, and others usually rent to businesses who expect to make money with the truck. Anytime I needed a truck for professional purposes, I knew I could get what I wanted from these guys. The total cost in the end actually wasn't that much more than Uhaul, but the equipment was much better. Make sure you SPECIFY a lift gate. For my purposes a lift gate slowed us down, so we always specified ramps. If you are coming or going to a tight spot, these companies can also usually set you up with a side door if you need one. Tie downs and blankets are usually not included, ask!
Have fun, Barry
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Brian Elfert responds:

Yes. The UHaul my wife rented to bring our stuff to P'burg was a POS from the word go. I was lucky. Only had to drive it to the gas station and to the drop-off. Someone else got to drive it the 300+ miles here from Bedford. It broke down in Roanoke (35 whole miles). I'd never have accepted the thing, even though the guy renting it is an old acquaintance, because one of the side rails (interior) was loose right about the level it could tear your eye out if you weren't careful.
Almost ended up paying for an extra day for the truck and unloading help because the UHaul truck was a POS.
No more.
Ryder or the Race Driver.
Charlie Self "It is not strange... to mistake change for progress." Millard Fillmore
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writes:

I've never had a good experience w/Uhaul. Also, I rented a larger hauler once and they pulled it up outside the rental office so when I got done paying the bill, I could drive it away. When I climbed up into it, it turned out to be a standard transmission truck. This wasn't a problem since I learned to drive in a vehicle w/standard transmission but don't you think they would ask? I'd venture to say that most people don't know how to drive one of those any more.
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Casey Stamper
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Todd Mummert asks:

Remove the fence. Don't remove the tables unless you want to spend a pot full of time realigning everything.

Don't know the actual weight, but I've installed about 4 sets by myself. You can handle thatme, but use clamps at each end to make sure the table doesn't drop suddenly and bend the bolts. Loosen one bolt a turn or so, then back out the others one at a time. I used to support the table with one hand and a knee while I backed out the last bolt, drop the wrench and grab the table with the second hand. They're heavy but not overly heavy.
Charlie Self "It is not strange... to mistake change for progress." Millard Fillmore
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) bellowed forth with this wisdom for all to hear:

I have to respectfully disagree here, especially for the larger jointers, unless you affix the jointer base to some strong square iron tubing or something to carry it. Carrying it by the tables will likely ruin it. My 6" Delta Pro is busted from this very thing. Broken infeed dovetail from being carried by the table ends. Didn't realize it until many months after the move, when I was getting my shop set up. Too late for a damage claim, way out of warranty... Don't let it happen to you.
After my jointer got ruined by carring it by the tables, I resolved that if I ever moved my shop again, I will take the time to disassemble the jointer tables from the center base, no matter how long it takes.
Joe
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Joe Helmick writes:

My point being that you are there, either moving the thing yourself, hopefully with help, or you have told the people doing the job not to lift by the f***ing tables or you'll string their guts around their necks like pearls.
Remove the fence, place 2x4s along the tables and, inside the junction and close to the cutterhead, use plastic wrap to hold the 2x4s to the jointer. Carry the jointer by the 2x4s.
Removing the tables is a waste of time and creates an incredible lack of goodwill towards your wrench set and other tool items when re-assembly time comes. For a simple tool, a joinoter is a royal PITA to re-align after disassembly.
Removing the base may, or my not, be a good idea, but removing the tables is not.
Charlie Self "It is not strange... to mistake change for progress." Millard Fillmore
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) bellowed forth with this wisdom for all to hear:

Now this makes sense... That's the right idea. Thanks!
(If I have to get a new jointer, this is how I'll get it into the shop).
Joe
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(Charlie Self) bellowed forth with this wisdomfor

parts, the stand and the top (includes the tables). I am getting ready to move and I will have the movers build a crate for the top/fence and remove it from the base (not lifting by the tables). When I put it together, I used an engine lift and lifted by the center section of the top (not the tables).
Montyhp
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Montyhp responds:

Best way. I've assembled a bunch of these things the easy way. Dead lift the sucker with hands in close to the cutterhead (well, with 6" each way). I could do that OK on the 6" models, but the DJ20 like to blew my garters off. Had to roll out the engine lift.
Which, by the way, was one of the best shop purchases I ever made. About $150 for the lift, and maybe $40 for various slings from Northern.
Charlie Self "It is not strange... to mistake change for progress." Millard Fillmore
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<snip>

easily so take it to the loading site as well. That and a pallet jack will let you move just about anything. Rigging and lifting is a skill which means you need to evaluate each lift, the jointer is a case in point, you sling it on the slides, but also use two sets of 2x4s lashed tight the length of the table so that bumps and such during the journey don't exert breaking forces on the ways.
Taking wings off a TS is also advisable, again because unexpected bumps on the journey can break the casting at the bolt holes, they're only held on by a couple of bolts.
One word of caution with an engine lift, they are pretty stable in the fore and aft direction but can take very little side movement. I picked up some long 3" pipe from the scrap yard that I put through the tubes in the the back box section and block that to prevent sideways tipping.
Bernard R
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Whatever you do, make sure you at least find out how much it costs to rent a liftgate truck. In my area, they can be had very inexpensively (around $75 per day plus mileage). Liftgates are simply awesome.
One other thing you might consider is to build several pallets out of 2x4's, plywood, etc, and then bolt your machines onto them. Wide pallets will make the machines less likely to tip. If you build them right, they'll also be difficult to slide. You can get the machines onto the pallets by tipping them slightly and then sliding them on. Not easy, but not that difficult with more than one person. Pallet jacks can most likely be rented from the same place that rents the liftgate truck.
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