Most dangerous tool in shop

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What in your opinion is the most dangerous tool in your wood shop, based on the number and severity of injuries you have received, not on what you have heard from other people.
My vote is first the stationary belt sander, Forever letting small wood pieces get away and scraping fingers, and second the drill press same reason.
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I tend to agree. It really still depends on the operator and how safe they work. A sander will give you some nasty "road rash" a table saw will take off body parts. Personally I think the hand held circular saw causes a lot more terrible accidents but that is because people tend to get a lot more reckless with them. My wife is the the construction business and these accidents are pretty common. They also have a lot of people "nailing" themselves with framing nailers. One guy managed to put a 16 penny nail in the roof of his mouth and didn't really know what happened until they got him to the ER.
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Sweet Sawdust asked >

The human brain, because when it stops working whether due to haste, exhaustion, or any other cause everything else can and often will to hell. For instance a few days ago while cutting rabbets in picture frames with a straight trim router bit my dust chute became clogged. I turned off the router, waited for the bit to stop spinning and not wanting to have to redo my fence setup I just slid my finger into the slot to clean it out unfortunately I grazed the bit and have a nice 5/16" cut(as measured with calipers to prove to SWMBO that it was not that bad). Blood in white oak is not a pretty sight, bright side is the table top was freshly waxed so no blood stains there.
Bill
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You're question doesn't quite have an answer the way it's phrased. I haven't hurt myself any of my tools within recent memory, but it doesn't mean they're all at the same danger level.
I've always put the drill press, belt grinder, and scroll saw in the "safest tool" catagory. The table saw, shaper, and jointer are the ones to watch out for. Flying and impaled body parts can ruin a good day.
GTO(John)

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On 27 Aug 2003 04:40:38 GMT, GTO69RA4 wrote:

I'd put a lathe in the "safest tools" category too. There's something comforting about a tool that lets you hold the sharp tool stationary while the wood does the spinning for you.
david
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Then you've never been hit in the head by a 10lb piece of oak travelling at 50mph.
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On 27 Aug 2003 14:23:22 -0400, DJ Delorie wrote:

I've never put a forstner bit through my hand, either, but I'm sure it's happened at one time or another. All tools are dangerous, given the proper circumstances.
My sympathy if you are talking from experience. That doesn't sound pretty.
david
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Then, based on the given criteria, your answer is non. You do get points, though, for actually reading and understanding the question.

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Sounds like it came from a person who only owns one tool - a belt sander.
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wonder where he 'buys' all the small wood pieces he sands?
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Make them my self

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<s> that was the point i was trying to make. . .
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wrote in message

For me, it has to be the humble screwdriver. Three times over the last 25 years, I've put screwdrivers straight through one of my fingers, usually when (mis)using one to remove a circlip. I did eventually learn from this repeated painful experience and bought a pair of circlip pliers.
Now, if you had asked which tool has the most potential for danger, that would have to be the table saw but luckily, I've not found a way of removing circlips with the TS yet
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I have to admit. I get very giggly when I see someone using a sharp pen-knife, or screwdriver to force something. Its not funny exactly, but a feeling of hysteria sets in when I see their hand begin to tremble, jamming the the small metal object at whatever they're working on. I can't NOT watch it, but I feel like covering my eyes still.
And invariably it ends up with the implement slipping forward, and the person grabs one hand or the other tightly to stop the bleeding. Sometimes it just results in a bad blood blister or torn off finger nail...
Rule of thumb. If you have ANYTHING in your hand that you are applying force to, and any part of you, or the tool begins trembling, start over and find a better way...
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Paramedics showed up across the street a couple of weeks ago. They treated the young man (early 20's) for a puncture wound to the inner thigh (yeah, about 2" away from the jewels). Turns out he was trying to separate frozen ravioli with a knife.
scott
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On Tue, 26 Aug 2003 23:06:06 -0500, "Sweet Sawdust"

snip
i would have to agree with Bill who posted on this one,,, the most dangerous thing in my shop is the operator of the tool... IE: me
if i don't keep my mind on what i am doing all the time, i am dangerous.
of course, my wife says if i had half a brain i would be dangerous..but that's another matter all together.
Traves
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Worst single injury: a back saw. holding on to a board, to 'stabilize' it in a light-duty vice, while hand-sawing, and "didn't notice" that my hand was in the path of the blade. Untill it was about 1/16" into the -bone- of the 1st joint of my finger, that is. No pain, very little blood -- only about a 1.5" long scar to show for it. oh, yeah. 35+ years ago.
most injuries: the paper I have plans, cut-lists, "whatever" listed on (paper cuts) Second place: hammer. hit the nail right on the thumb, or equivalent.
I've -never- had an injury with a power tool.
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On Tue, 26 Aug 2003 23:06:06 -0500, "Sweet Sawdust"

Who cares ? I've not yet sawn an arm off, I know some of my machines could easily do it. The _potential_ for injury is more important than its past history.
For past injuries, it's my chain blocks. Dropped some girder on my foot once and squashed a foot flat.
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On Wed, 27 Aug 2003 12:07:14 +0100, Andy Dingley
snip

That's gonna leave a mark
Traves
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In thirty years of futzing around in the shop, I've had one minor accident with the table saw. However, if the total number of painful experiences is to be believed, the trusty old hammer should have a skull and crossbones etched on it.
James...
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