Mortising Survey

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: Luigi Zanasi wrote: :> I use mortice for the noun & mortise for the verb, on the advice/advise :> model.
: What about pronunciation? Do you use a "mor-tize-ing" chisel to cut a : "mor-tis"? :) Please "ad-vize".
Or, along the lines of choice/choose, should I mortoose my mortices :) ?
Norm
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Floating tenons. Beadlock. Quick...easy.....accurate.
TomL
On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 13:54:43 -0600, Vince Heuring

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I use my DW625 which has offset router base. I figure out if you fit a 12mm stright bit and router the tenon piece with one side of the base riding on a stright edge and turn to another side of the base for routing the other tenon face, you will get a perfect 12mm width tenon. Use the same bit and edge guide to route mortise and I have a perfect machine fit joint and the tenon shoulder is level on all sides. The good thing come with this method is that you only set up the stright edge once and do the tenons like production run. Since the workpiece is clamp down, I can route in the wrong direction which eliminates chip out.
yy
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You forgot my way: drill press out waste with forstner bit and chisel out remaining waste. I'd rather pound them out by hand with a mortise chisel but I don't think my downstairs neighbor would appreciate that. :-)
Layne
On Mon, 15 Sep 2003 13:54:43 -0600, Vince Heuring

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By hand with a mortise chisel and a swan-necked chisel for clean up.
I don't drill out first, but instead use the method descibed on Jeff Gorman's (excellent) website.
why? 'cos I don't cut a high volume by many folk's standards around here, and because I'm enjoying honing the technique.
For tenons I cheat a little, cut the shoulders first, and remove to thickness using a router and a quick'n'dirty mdf jig. Mostly because I don't own a decent tenon saw yet.
cheers Richard
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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Hand chiseled for the small one-offs. Drill press followed with chisels to clean for repetitive cuts. Own a router, but haven't even cranked it up yet. I always seem to do the work with a hand tool or other method so far.
Table saw and occasional handsaw for the tenons. Cleanup with a sharp knife for fit (I tend to make them a little large so I can trim down for a very TIGHT fit) and a small plane I picked up somewhere once.
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The what is a drill press and cleanup with chisels. Tenons on the bandsaw.
The why is that is what I had to work with.
To clarify, I built a Tudor style garden bench with about 50 M & T joints. It was, for me, quite an undertaking as I've never done that type of joint. It gives new respect for the guys that make such beautiful joints, especially the neander way.
If I was to do it again, I'd probably invest in a dedicated mortising machine and a tenon fixture for the table saw. That works out to about $7 a joint for that project. Ed
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