Mortising attachment for a drill press

Page 1 of 2  
I recently did a posting about Poplar. I will be making 8 frame and panel doors using poplar for stiles and rails and some 1/4" panels. Each door will have 3 rails: 4" top and middle and 6" at the bottom. The stiles will be 3". Total door width 14" I made a prototype which was good for evaluation but I need to make doors that are more sturdy. In particular I want to make 1" tenons on each end of the three rails and a matching mortise in the stiles. 8 doors. 6 mortise and tenon joints per door. 48 joints.
I do not have a dedicated mortising machine. I might use a Kreg jig but the holes will be visible each time the door is opened. I might be able to use the plugs with a lot of sanding so the joining technique isn't too ugly (the doors will be painted). I could of course use my drill press and a chisel which I have done before but not on 48 mortise and tenon joints. I thought I would ask if anyone has used a mortising attachment for a drill press before I choose one of the two options mentioned above. Maybe someone has a different idea I can use for a sturdy joint.
Your advice is appreciated as always.
TIA.
Dick Snyder
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/20/2015 9:59 PM, Dick Snyder wrote:

I have a dedicated mortising machine. I would not recommend mortising with a drill press as the handle is too short. But if you have an old drill press with a long arm, then by all means do it. If you have a short 3 handle drill press don't do it.
My 2 cents.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 20 Apr 2015 22:12:28 -0400

is this because you can't do the entire mortise in one fluid move
or
some other reason
i drill deep holes and find it real annoying to have to grab the next handle back
now this has me wondering if i could remove a handle and make one handle longer
not sure if there are other limitations with the drill press i.e. a longer handle might not turn free without hitting something
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/20/2015 11:22 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

With a drill press there is typically some disassemble involved and it is an adaptation. Then you can't use the DP until you remove the mortising attachment. I think this was a popular option decades ago when bench top mortisers were not common for home woodworkers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I presume these quaint tools came before the Domino, eh Leon?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorta :-). I recall my shop class room having two DP's, one had a mortiser attachment with foot pedal assist. All of the mortiser pieces were a different color from the rest of the DP. That was 1969. Somewhere in the 90's I recall $200 bench top mortisers hit my radar and I bought a Delta. That worked but I have not used it since getting the Domino when they were introduced, some time around 2007-8 I know of no tool that cuts mortises as quickly and easily as the Domino.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/21/2015 12:22 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

leverage. A mortiser or really old drill press, use long arms. So they have the leverage that a mortiser needs. Plain and simple.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 21 Apr 2015 17:58:48 -0400

makes sense
must require additional force due to the chisel
and I'd think you'd want that chisel to be sharp at all times
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The drill takes out most of the wood (or should) and you must let it transport it to the surface or you jamb up the Mortise chisels and run the risk of splitting the chisel. So the process is in / out or down and up a bit and down for more. Not to Drive like you are pressing a nail into the wood.
Martin
On 4/21/2015 5:41 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 21 Apr 2015 23:07:29 -0500

that makes sense too so you're saying a lot of force is not needed but that depends on the wood
but it all sounds primitive
where're the laser mortisers
they have laser etchers/engravers seems like a laser mortiser would just need a few more passes
or maybe super high pressure water like they use to cut paper
maybe a little messy for the typical artisan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's not quite right. The first pass usually has to be done in several up & down strokes. The remaining passes are a single down stoke (assuming you have the chisel oriented so the opening faces the previously cut part of the mortise, which is how you should have it oriented).
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dad had a Delta unit on his double belted Delta. Sorry it went the way of thief out of my brothers shop. Like I said in/out or down and up a bit down for more. Can't push it all of the way.
You said the same thing but added a final fine cut or clean out pass. Big deal - that wasn't the process discussed.
Martin
On 4/22/2015 12:19 PM, John McCoy wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, that's not what I said. I said on a proper mortising machine, all the cuts except for the very first are done in a single pass. It's only the first hole (which will be square) where you have to be concerned about allowing the shavings to clear. In every succeeding cut, the shavings fall into the mortise.
Now, possibly it's different on an underpowered and under-leveraged drill press attachement. But with a mortising machine, it is "push it all of the way".
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Going to have to explain "in every succeeding cut, the shavings fall into the mortise."
Is this the second hole ? Is this a first ? If the first it is up and down clearing.
If you are cutting man made material - MDF or such - it might not matter. When cutting oak and hard maple - one better go slow.
I have seen chisels split by wood jamming into the cavity and using the drill to compact and stretch.
The drill press had power. Real power. Three pulley, two belts. The motor was a 3/4 hp and could really run the spindle. It was for Metal and Wood use. It had a special spindle for This and another for boring while a normal drill spindle with a 1/2" chuck that would hold sub 1/16 centered. It was heavy duty Delta - built in the early 50's. Not like the pot metal ones you see today.
Martin
On 4/23/2015 10:57 AM, John McCoy wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It should be clear, but anyway: when you make a mortise, you make a series of slightly overlapping cuts - if you're using a 3/8" chisel for a 2" mortise, you'll probably make 6 cuts.
The first cut, the shavings have nowhere to go but up the chisel. That one you (usually) have to make in several up and down strokes, to let the shavings clear.
The next cut, slightly overlapping the first, the shavings will fall into the hole made by the first cut. And so on down the line, each succeeding cut the shavings fall into the hole from the prior cuts.
The only way that doesn't happen is if the open side of the chisel is not facing the prior cuts. In that case, the shavings again have nowhere to go but up. But if you're doing it that way, you're doing it wrong.
I mostly work with maple & cherry, incidently...no problem cutting the mortises in single pulls.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/23/2015 5:17 PM, Martin Eastburn wrote:

I have an old King Seely Drill press built I guess in the 40's. I used the mortising attachment that I got with it for many years, and it worked perfect, no problem with the power, no problem with the arms not giving enough leverage, and the hold down was better than the one on my Delta dedicated mortiser. The only real draw back, which was mentioned by someone earlier, was it was a pain to put on and off, and when installed, you had no drill press. I was going to buy a cheap bench drill press to leave it on, but never got aroundtoit.
The dedicated mortiser is OK, but it's drawback is it is always there, even though I don't use it all that often. Less often since I've been using pocket holes for all face frames.
For cabinet doors, I'd prefer a frame and panel cutter set and stub tenons rather than using mortise and tenon. I would recommend skipping the drill press attachment, skip the dedicated mortiser, and buy a good set or two of frame and panel Knives for my shaper or even a router if you don't have a shaper. For giant mortises, say in a front door for your house, use a router.
--
Jack
Add Life to your Days not Days to your Life.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/25/2015 9:13 AM, Jack wrote:
Good to see you back...
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/25/2015 3:50 PM, Swingman wrote:

Thanks Swing. Never really left, just don't participate much.
--
Jack
Add Life to your Days not Days to your Life.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A now this has me wondering if i could remove a handle and make one

A - "there you go" B - "Simple enough to check, right?"
I knew a fellow who connected a (spring-loaded) foot-pedal affair to control the quill movement.
But, how much work are you willing to do to save some time and effort with the mortices for this project?.
For the $$ and intended use, it might be worth trying out the HFT dedicated mortising attachment - if you can complete the work in thirty days . . .
If you already have the Mortising Attachment - do use it, do make do.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
1On Sun, 3 May 2015 10:20:13 -0700 (PDT)

i'm only a member of the peanut gallery on this thread and was only trying to understand why the reply to the OP mentioned the handle length
it turns out that it was due to the force needed to press down to make the cut
then much bluster ensued about doing more cuts that take less material and taking care to clear the swath between cuts

the co op with the CNC router with vacuum hold down would be the way to go
could do all mortises in one go not sure about the tenons yet

I do but don't want to use it see above
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.