Mortise-Tenon Fix Advice/Opinion Request

I'm trying to finish up that trash(ed) chair I mentioned here weeks ago. http://home.mchsi.com/%7Elawlhote/chair/chair.htm
There is one problem(among many) that envolves a back support tenon and the mortise in the back leg. From the pictures, it is clear the mortise is FAR too large for the tenon.
http://home.mchsi.com/%7Elawlhote/chair/backmortise1.jpg
http://home.mchsi.com/%7Elawlhote/chair/backmortise2.jpg
The mortise is a little more than 3/8" thick and the corresponding tenon is a little more than 1/4" thick(needless to say, it rattles). The length of the mortise is the issue here. The little nail hole is because someone needed to stabliize the joint a little with one of those Norm brads. As I see it, there is really no easy way to make the tenon any larger. I'm thinking about filling in large gap area in the mortise with tight fitting pieces of oak and then packing slivers around the tenon then glueing the joint with epoxy. TIA Larry
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How about squaring up the corners of the mortise and glueing in a solid block of oak, then cutting a new mortise in that?
Art

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I didn't think of that. I knew someone would have a better idea. That's what I'm going to do.
Larry
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Art's fix should work well, since the tenon seems to be in pretty good shape.
An alternative fix, assuming there's enough meat in the tenoned member, would be to remove the tenon entirely and cut a corresponding mortice (or a bridle joint), then use a loose tenon between the two mortices. This is quite a common fix when the tenon has actually broken or is so chewed up with nail and screw holes that it's become weak.
Cheers
Frank

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On Sun, 11 Apr 2004 20:45:38 GMT, "Frank McVey"
|Art's fix should work well, since the tenon seems to be in pretty good |shape.
I agree | |An alternative fix, assuming there's enough meat in the tenoned member, |would be to remove the tenon entirely and cut a corresponding mortice (or a |bridle joint), then use a loose tenon between the two mortices. This is |quite a common fix when the tenon has actually broken or is so chewed up |with nail and screw holes that it's become weak.
Might be tough since it's an angled tenon.
Wes
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Yup, you're right, Wes - I only looked at the first picture, which shows an apparently straight tenon. Under these circumstances, a better fix would be to replace a damaged tenon with a full-width extension using a bridle joint and recut the angled tenon as if from scratch..
Cheers,
Frank
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Jewberrywellgum.
Art

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