Mortise and Tenon Machine?

Page 2 of 2  

Oleg Lego (in snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com) said:
| Aha! Have a look at http://www.tinaja.com/glib/hackar2.pdf for more | info. The article starts on page 116 (Acrobat page, or 44.2 article | page).
Downloaded it last night - thanks! I think I'll stick with store-bought steppers so I can have the 400 step/revolution resolution.
Just to keep all of this interesting (and more than just hot air) I hand-coded a couple of part programs last night that should let me cut common, half-blind, and (non-mitered) full-blind dovetails using only a straight bit. Dovetail height, width, angle, and spacing are set as parameters; and the code self-adjusts for the size of bit used. What's fun is that there's no 'round' anywhere except in the corners, and use of a sufficiently small diameter bit should make that difficult to see.
It'd be fun to build a small CNC joinery machine that could be dedicated to gnawing on the ends of boards like this. With a bit of luck, I'll have some pix to put on ABPW tonight. :-)
Hi-ho, hi-ho, ...
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Morris Dovey entity posted thusly:

Probably just as well. The resulting stepper not only has a lot fewer steps per revolution, but not a lot of torque. They are just not made for that duty, and while they will work, are not anywhere near as good as real steppers.
If you happen to know, what is the holding torque on your ShopBot steppers?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Oleg Lego (in snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com) said:
| If you happen to know, what is the holding torque on your ShopBot | steppers?
I don't know. The only clue I have handy is a comment in the Users' Guide that they exert a "Linear force 60-75 lb. at cutting speed, depending on gearing."
Today I encountered my first problem (in over two years) with the machine and plan to talk with the factory folks tomorrow. I'll ask about holding torque.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Morris Dovey (in dWdsf.18$ snipped-for-privacy@news.uswest.net) said:
| Just to keep all of this interesting (and more than just hot air) I | hand-coded a couple of part programs last night that should let me | cut common, half-blind, and (non-mitered) full-blind dovetails | using only a straight bit. Dovetail height, width, angle, and | spacing are set as parameters; and the code self-adjusts for the | size of bit used. What's fun is that there's no 'round' anywhere | except in the corners, and use of a sufficiently small diameter bit | should make that difficult to see. | | It'd be fun to build a small CNC joinery machine that could be | dedicated to gnawing on the ends of boards like this. With a bit of | luck, I'll have some pix to put on ABPW tonight. :-) | | Hi-ho, hi-ho, ...
As usual, everything takes longer and costs more. Photo of first half-blind dovetails finally posted to abpw.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OH!.. It's YOU again! *S*... the voice of reason!
You make too much sense. Maybe it is because of that little nudge here, and little nudge there that I get from you on a regular basis, but a Bot is in the 2006 budget... at least the expansion of shop space is. I just may have to rough it without the Colombo spindle for a while.. without the ArtCAM Pro software...without the big vacuum system...I have build-up systems before, in fact, I think that's what I like best about business..the growth.
Thanks for all the input, and I wish you the very best Christmas and prosperous 2006.
Rob
PS.. it's that piece of solid surface material on the fore-ground of this picture that tells me all I need to know (from an accounting standpoint....*s*)
http://www.shopbottools.com/images/shopbot5_1100.jpg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robatoy (in snipped-for-privacy@nr-tor01.bellnexxia.net) said:
| || It was when I added up || the prices on this general type of equipment that I decided to || apply the crowbar for my ShopBot. | | OH!.. It's YOU again! *S*... the voice of reason!
:-)
| You make too much sense. Maybe it is because of that little nudge | here, and little nudge there that I get from you on a regular | basis, but a Bot is in the 2006 budget... at least the expansion of | shop space is.
Take a little time to look around at used 'Bots and at some of the recent [ahem] Chinese offerings. If I had it to do over, I think I'd still go for a ShopBot because of the support available from the company and other users - but I'd have waited for a really good deal on a used machine.
| I just may have to rough it without the Colombo spindle for a | while.. without the ArtCAM Pro software...without the big vacuum | system...I have build-up systems before, in fact, I think that's | what I like best about business..the growth.
The 5HP spindle is a delight; but I don't have any of the razzle-dazzle software - and my big vacuum system is a recycled refrigerator compressor and a set of pucks. Do plan on having dust collection in place from the very beginning.
Also take a bit of time to look around for alternate sources for the Colombo. You may find it available for less than the ShopBot price -- and there /are/ other good spindles available (both new and used).
| Thanks for all the input, and I wish you the very best Christmas and | prosperous 2006.
I wish you the same; and that 2006 is the year of the 'Bot for you - and that you make it pay for itself before the year ends. Feel welcome to call if I can be of help.
| PS.. it's that piece of solid surface material on the fore-ground of | this picture that tells me all I need to know (from an accounting | standpoint....*s*) |
http://www.shopbottools.com/images/shopbot5_1100.jpg
If you're getting really serious about this, join the ShopBot Forum and read it every day. Major new items this past week have ranged from a tutorial (from Quebec) about cutting curved moldings to a new blog (from South Africa) with a /lot/ of photos showing how to set up and do all kinds of interesting things with the 'Bot.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Robatoy" wrote [snip]

Rob,
The Colombo spindle is a nice upgrade, but don't let that hold you back. I've done everything from machining an entire production line system (5 modules) from 1", 1-1/2" and 2-1/2" HDPE, to cutting Polycarbonate doors, to engraving equipment nameplates (down to 14 point text) with the same machine.
The learning curve is the hardest part ... we literally learned while building the production line equipment. Using the provided software with the Shopbot, and using TurboCad as the design front end, we were able to use 90% or better from each 4' x 8' sheet of plastic. We made structural panels, conveyers, robotics parts ... you name it, we did it. Even engraved the company logo onto the front and rear panels of each module for that extra nice touch. Countersunk holes for shoulder bolts was no issue ... just another layer in the drill file (each depth was cut as a separate layer ... the so-called 2-1/2D method). My boss did most of the toolpath layout and used the same kerf twice whenever possible ... minimizing waste. We learned along the way that plastic will warp just like wood if you take too much out at once and don't give things a bit of time to relax ... and don't trust that 1" extruded plastic to be closer than say +/- .030".
Lots more to encourage you with ... especially Shopbot support ... had one channel go dead in the middle of cutting some conveyer sprockets, a quick call to them and they told me how to use the spare channel until I repaired the main drive channel. Great guys.
Our purchase was made much easier by the fact that the factory is an hour and a half away ... we went for an on-site visit, and I then drove back and hauled the entire shopbot back in my minivan. Assembly took two days (mostly by myself), and to this day, I'd do it all over again.
Regards,
Rick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A very solid day's drive for me. I am 1 hour north of Detroit MI on the Canadian side. I would still pick it up myself and spend some time catching some training which I would also be happy to pay for. I would insist on assembling the thing myself as I plan to maintain it.
The steel will be done here. Half the price by people I know and trust. I'll even get it powder coated for that same price. Got a millwright in the family as well.
Everything I'm doing is focused on the peripheral equipment so I can feed this thing properly when it gets plopped into the middle of my manufacturing centre.
If I have another year like 2005, I might be building a complete kitchen per month by January 2007.....by myself. I have a wonderful supplier for my doors, but there is one weak link in my business plan ---> a reliable/affordable edge-bander which will do vinyl as well as solid wood edging.
So much for Freedom 55 retirement, eh?
Hey.. a guy can dream, can't he?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The Leigh or the Multi-Router? I've decided to build my own Dave-Multi-Router after the first or the year. As for the Leigh tool, I saw it in action at a wood show and it worked really well, but for the money, it was too much.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

As is often the case, the flexibility which is designed into the tool seldom gets used to its full potential. That makes it hard to justify the expense. Low toy value.
The Multi-Router is expensive as well, and, IMHO, hardly a hobbyist product. (unless a well-heeled hobbyist) I can see it in a small scale production environment where it is fed dimensioned lumber all day long. Very high toy value.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Woodworkers Supply in Casper, Wyoming sells a cheaper version of the multi-router. It has more plastic in it and is more intended for the wood hobbyist than is the industrial grade multi-router that JDS makes (the one that's on http://www.tools-for-woodworking.com ). If I remember correctly it was around $600 plus accessories and templates. When I saw it demonstrated at a wood show a couple of years ago it seemed to do a good job, although I noticed that there really isn't any tolerance adjustment for fitting tenons to mortices, except for the masking tape that the guy had wrapped around the follower pin when he was making the tenon so it would fit tighter in the mortice.
--
Charley


"mpserf44" < snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The WoodRat. You supply the router. Basic cost is $650, but tooling will bring it up another $600. Get the introductory DVD for $5 and then decide if you want to buy it. I got mine in April and am amazed.
The Multi-Router from JDS operates on a similar principle. At $2500, it is better is some ways, but lacks the super dust collection of the WoodRat.
Download the brochure, the manual, or order here at chipsfly.com Click on the icon for "Machine Features". Superior support from this company.
Gary Curtis Los Angeles
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The WoodRat. You supply the router. Basic cost is $650, but tooling will bring it up another $600. Get the introductory DVD for $5 and then decide if you want to buy it. I got mine in April and am amazed.
The Multi-Router from JDS operates on a similar principle. At $2500, it is better is some ways, but lacks the super dust collection of the WoodRat.
Download the brochure, the manual, or order here at chipsfly.com Click on the icon for "Machine Features". Superior support from this company.
Gary Curtis Los Angeles
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.