More Plunge Saws

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Well thank you Chris for pointing out those features! CRAP! Now I will more seriously consider this drill when the time comes.
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Well, to help stoke this fire a little while I am doing my paperwork, check this out to see if this can help you decide how much money you need to put aside:
http://www.mcfeelys.com/festool-drills
You should know though, that a couple of years ago there was (yet another "shootout") a fairly comprehensive test in one of the ww mags and the Festool was no more than middle of the pack. The winner was the Bosch "Brute" line with its heavy case and the amount of screws driven. It only slightly edged out the newer line of Ridgid that came out with the 15 minute recharge batteries and lifetime case warranty.
Robert
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wrote:

What does it say on the tool?
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I thought about that, and realized that the Authorized dealer didn't have any real reason to lie. Really, who would proclaim their tools are proudly made in China?
No one in town stocks any Fein product except Woodcraft, and I knew better than to call them. They only stock the Multimaster in limited quantities with all accessories being special order.
See above for my phone call to Amazon. Indeed, made in China.
Robert
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wrote:

My MILWAUKEE jigsaw is made in Germany. Go figgur. So is my Ridgid 2610 6" sander.
Bought a set of Bosch 18V tools a while back. Two Swiss, one Mexico, one China .... Open markets.
I'd probably test things that could hurt people in Europe too, given the lawyer/user ratio.
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Could it be that the European countries have caps on lawsuits, encase something is a bad design.
--
Mike
Watch for the bounce.
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I guess that could certainly be a valid reason. But, as pointed out by another post this saw design may be better suited to the European style of woodworking.
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I thought the writer offered a more interesting question for this blog "Is this saw strictly for plywood and sheet goods? Or, can you see using this set-up for all your circular-saw needs. "
Awfully expensive for the occaisonal plywood cut, no?
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wrote:

I think perhaps a bargain for the person that does handy man repairs and or a wood worker just starting out. Certainly cheaper than a decent TS and probably produces better results than a similarly priced TS on sheet goods. For the framer, I don't think so. For the reasons I previously mentioned add the question, how many framers are going to use 2 hands to plunge the saw to cut a 2x when on a job site? IMHO this saw is targeting the cabinet builder and coupled with the work table that Festool sells the combination will do just about anything except cut dado's.
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Leon wrote:

They should put a depth stop on the plunge mechanism...then it could do dados/grooves as well!
Chris
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The Festool and IIRC The DeWalt do have depth stops but I do not know if you could stack dado blades on the these saws. This is what keeps the saw from cutting "through" the table tops on those nice benches that they sell. Believe it or not I do have a dado set for a hand held circle saw that works pretty well, all things considered.
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O(nce again - late to a thread
Couple of things to note
1. The Euro equivalent of OSHA does not permit "blind cuts" - in table saws - so no dado blades - euro table saws won't hold them. Routers do the job safer
2. The Euro plunge saws, probably developed by Festool, isn't designed nor intended to be used by a stick frame carpenter. It is intended for working with sheet goods. Festool made it a part of a portable, integrated, woodworking system which can be used in a small shop - AND - on site.
The Festool plunge saw will cut at a desired line -whether the blade is at 90s or 45 degrees. It has built in "zero clearance" which minimizes or eliminates tear out where the saw teeth come up out of the sheet goods. It has pretty precise depth of cut setting that's reproducable and easily seen reference lines for starting and stopping a cut.
One of the major woodworking tools and techniques for Euros came about at the end of WW II. Europe was pretty torn up - manufacturing devastated, the supply of solid wood quite limited and a huge demand for basic household furniture - mainly cabinets to put things in. So a bright fellow came up with "manufactured wood products" which used the readily available wood debris. Skilled woodworkers were in very short supply - war not being particularly good for males between 16 and 70. So a bright German came up with a system of cabinet making that could use task specific tools and jigs (that didn't require the large capital investment that mass production required) to make up for the lack of skilled craftsmen.
We, in the U.S. have been playing with woodworking tools and machines that, for the most part, are basically the same as they were 50 plus years ago - machine green being replaced by Platinum White, and brand colors - for plastic parts. And while we were getting Tried And True - the Europeans have been innovating. The fact that riving knives are finally showing up on tables saw, and riving knives will start showing up on these plunge saws, seem to indicate that US "manufacturers" (actually distributors of foreign made products) that are FINALLY getting the message - catch up or watch your market share disappear.
Tired - sleep required. End of message
charlie b - the 32 mm System
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Great post
Mark
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