More old planes

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With advice from some of the helpful folks here, I had a modest success cleaning up and then using one of my Dad's old block planes. The experience has left me more curious about planes in general.
I did some brief rooting around in his garage after a visit last night and found a couple of things. The first was a Stanley #78 Rabbet Plane. It appears to be in really good condition. I saw a video recently that described some uses for that sort of plane that I probably wouldn't have thought of on my own; cleaning up and fine-tweaking rabbets cut with power tools, for instance.
I also found a "Groove Plane" (with several blades and attachments), but have so far left that one behind. It looks like that would be for cutting rabbets from scratch, which I don't imagine I will be doing. But I was surprised about the Rabbet Plane, so maybe some of you can suggest a use for this one as well. (My "woodworking", such as it is, consists of modest skills applied to an occasional project).
I also found a Stanley #3, or most of one, anyway. It's missing the lever cap. I did a quick Ebay search, and so far it looks like the lever caps go for almost as much as the complete tool. I have a feeling that it's in my Dad's garage somewhere. I may look around again when I get more time. Any suggestions as to where else I might find a replacement? I was thinking about keeping an eye out for a really damaged plane to cannibalize for parts. Any other helpful suggestions about this style of plane would be appreciated as well.
Greg Guarino
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There's a brisk business on eBay for spare parts for Stanley planes, and apparently random, rusted collections of parts can fetch surprising amounts...or get no bids and nothing at all. As you've noted, a lever cap might cost you as much as a complete beater #3, and buying a reasonable complete plane might be the easiest and fastest way to get to work.
When you say "groove plane" do you mean a tongue and groove plane? What brand/model and what sort of attachments? A dedicated tongue and groove plane is another very useful tool to have on hand. Having one that is sitting on the shelf and ready to go is particularly useful when you are only running a few feet of grooves, or if you have to go back and remake a piece if there's a snafu. It's frequently faster than changing bits over on a router.
You've probably already seen Roy Underhill's The Woodwright's Shop on PBS. He's the guy that only uses hand tools and human power and frequently sports bandages and/or a little blood here and there on his hands. ;) There are complete episodes viewable online on the PBS web site and if you're interested in getting started in working with hand tools and planes, those episodes are a great place to start.
R
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On 8/23/2011 10:41 AM, RicodJour wrote:

I think I'll have a more detailed look around my Dad's garage first. A flurry of large expenses have left me in a frugal state of mind, especially as regards "hobby" acquisitions.

I've got to look at it more closely. At first glance it appeared to be designed to make a narrow rabbet at the edge of a piece of wood (I noticed a side fence, I think). Figuring I would probably choose a router for a job like that, I left it behind.

There seemed to be a handful of different blades that came with it, plus some other attachments. I remember now that I called it a "groove plane" only because that's what it said on the embossed old-style Dymo label that was on the ammunition box my Dad kept the tool in. I'm pretty sure it was also a Stanley.
I have since done a little poking around online. I watched a video about "Tongue and Groove" planes, but I doubt that's what it is, as I don't remember any "split" blades. I also saw some combination planes online, which look somewhat like what I remember. But that side "fence", if indeed that's what it was, looked fixed.
This has definitely piqued my interest, even if just to find out what it is.

Thanks. I've been thinking of setting up a giant stone flywheel in my garage, but it might dent the car.
Greg
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wrote:

Greg, it's time you and the little missus came to an understanding. You won't lay your woodworking tools on her car if she keeps it in the driveway where it belongs. Besides, the gar^H^H^HSHOP is no place to keep an automobile. It'd get dusty or dented.
If you have any problems, just tell her I said so. OK?
[I can hear it now..."Bbbut, C-less said I could..."]
-- Learning to ignore things is one of the great paths to inner peace. -- Robert J. Sawyer
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On 8/24/2011 7:43 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

In all seriousness, parking a car in the garage has actually enhanced my ability to use the garage for shop projects. Most of the garages I have seen are full to the rafters with junk. When I pull the car out, ours is essentially empty, leaving lots of room to work.
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Greg Guarino wrote:

Having lots of room is a start. Having lots of room with a workbench of some sort is markedly better. I assume you have that. What about tools, power and light? Hoosierpopi (sp), and others, gave me a big push a year and a half ago and I still haven't recovered. LOL. Have fun!
Bill
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On 8/25/2011 12:25 AM, Bill wrote:

I wouldn't call it "lots" of room. It's a small house with a one-car garage. But I did say "essentially" empty. I have a basic home-brew workbench at the back of the garage, made from 4x4s, 2x10s and a solid-core door.
Most of the work I do around the house is well, "around the house", rather than woodworking. But I learned long ago that I simply don't have the patience or energy to have every task delayed and interrupted when I need to find a tool or part. My tools and materials are well organized. Some hang behind the bench for easy access, others are in steel shelving on one side of the garage or in my three toolboxes (electrical, plumbing and general).
I have three scrap wood areas: Short, Medium and Long. "Long" hangs from the ceiling. Plywood leans against one wall. Every wall surface has something leaning on it or hanging from it. I joke that you can tell what model of car we have by looking at the outline of the garage storage. But it's that car that "enforces" the empty space.
Power is pretty good. While no expert at any of these skills, I've gotten to be pretty decent at electrical work. I have two dedicated circuits and outlets distributed well enough not to need extension cords. The lighting is decent as well, two 48" fluorescent fixtures with two tubes in each. I may eventually put in a third.
I have a reasonable smattering of low-end hand-held power tools. I don't have room for a table saw, but the mitre saw comes in handy. For ripping, it's a circular saw and fence. For dadoes, a router. I have exactly as many clamps as I needed for my most clamp-intensive project: 15. (that's the longer ones, my wife and daughter tease me about the multitude of small quick-loks an spring clamps that seem to sprout around my various household maintenance jobs)
If I were to do much real woodworking, I might get frustrated with my setup. But for now it's an occasional hobby and I enjoy what little I do.
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Greg Guarino wrote:

You might have more fun if you become a "malcontent". With all due respect, there must be some project that would help take you out of the comfort zone that you're in? Your wood supply sounds very-nicely organized. Until you get unsatisfied, it's going to be difficult for anyone to assist you! Don't let that keep you from posting though. I feel confident the group can help you find something.
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On Tue, 23 Aug 2011 09:49:57 -0400, Greg Guarino wrote:

I'm guessing it's a router plane. Does it look similar to this modern version:
http://www.veritastools.com/products/Page.aspx?p 2
If so, don't give up on it. For example, a lot of saw blades and some dado sets don't leave a flat bottom. A router plane can fix that in a few strokes.
They weren't used to cut rabbets, but dados. A saw was used to cut the two edges and the router plane then cleaned out the middle. I did a couple that way just to try the technique and it's a lot quicker than you might think.
OTOH, you might really have a rabbet plane. Or a Stanley combination plane like:
http://www.oldtooluser.com/TypeStudy/StanNo45CombPlaneTypeStudy.htm
In that case, all I can say is *You suck!*
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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I've got an old #78 rabbet plane that I love and would rather use that my Bosch for cutting rabbets.
And an old #171 router plane that doesn't get as much use as it should...
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On 8/23/2011 12:38 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

It doesn't. I would have known what that one was for. Back in High School we had to use one to make a blind dado (is that the right term?). In fact, I think we had to make the entire dado by hand with a hand saw, possibly a chisel, and a router plane to finish it off.

The possibility of being the envy of a total stranger on Rec.Woodworking has me intrigued. I assume those planes were to cut a groove parallel to the edge of a piece, like for a drawer bottom? I'll have to investigate further to find out if I suck. It did come with a number of different blades and attachments.
Greg Guarino
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On 8/23/2011 12:38 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

OK, you can relax now. It's a Stanley 248, to which the Blood & Gore Guy gave quite a harsh "review" indeed. I'm not entirely sure why, yet.
I took it to a piece of scrap oak last night and was able to plow a groove parallel to one of the edges, which seems to be its function. It wasn't an entirely smooth operation, but then I didn't try to sharpen the blade first either. The fence is adjustable as is the depth stop.
The biggest "problem" I had, apart from the less-than-sharp blade, was that the tool effectively rests on a narrow edge, which means you have to keep it plumb manually.
I'll give it another try sometime when it's not already 9pm. I could imagine a use for such a plane, although finally getting a router table could probably accomplish the same thing.
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On Thu, 25 Aug 2011 11:27:24 -0400, Greg Guarino wrote:

Ah so - a weatherstripping plane. Talk about special purpose :-).
Patrick's never been known to hide his opinions, with which he is plentifully supplied :-). He calls most of the transition planes "fit only for firewood" but I kinda' lke them. Everyone to their own taste.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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On 8/25/2011 12:14 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

True enough, but it's function seems to be making narrow grooves (there are 5 blades of different widths) within maybe 1.5" of an edge. That doesn't seem too exotic to me, at least before table saws and routers were common. A table saw is still pretty "uncommon" in my shop.
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On 8/23/2011 8:49 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

The No. 3 is a very useful plane and PLENTY of them were manufactured; you shouldn't have any trouble at all (if you keep your eyes peeled) in finding a good lever cap for that plane, and you shouldn't have to pay anywhere near the price of a full plane to get one. I personally wouldn't pay more than $10 for one. Shipped. Example:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Lever-Cap-Stanley-Bailey-No-3-5-Post-1933-w-Patent-/180713898740?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2a136342f4
--
Free bad advice available here.
To reply, eat the taco.
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On Tue, 23 Aug 2011 13:00:54 -0500, Steve Turner

No wonder he charges so much for those parts. He used up almost a whole can of copper spray paint on the group he's selling now. Whadda maroon...
Here's a sweet little low angle block (60-1/2) for $5. Greg needs one! http://goo.gl/9qAGq
-- It is characteristic of all deep human problems that they are not to be approached without some humor and some bewilderment. -- Freeman Dyson
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You might want to look at Patrick Leach's Stanley Blood and Gore page. There is a wealth of information about all Stanley planes.
http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan0.htm
Luigi
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On 8/23/2011 1:23 PM, Luigi Zanasi wrote:

Boy, you're really trying to push him right onto the slippery slope, aren't you? :-)
--
"Our beer goes through thousands of quality Czechs every day."
(From a Shiner Bock billboard I saw in Austin some years ago)
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Nobody tell the OP about trebuchets........
-Zz
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On 8/23/2011 2:23 PM, Luigi Zanasi wrote:

Thanks. I found that on my own. That's one of the real high points of the Web, we can all benefit from one person's obsession.
Greg Guarino
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