More of a general construction question but. . .


This is more of a general construction question but this group always proves most helpfull.
I am installing pressure treated posts for a railing on an above-ground deck. Wanted to use cypress but it's just too damn expensive - 13.99/ft for 4x4 here in PA.
The posts will have a half lap milled and then be attached to the rim joist, or what some call the header joists, around the perimeter of the deck. The problem I have is that the decking material is waterproof aluminum tongue and groove and slopes from the center of the deck to each edge to allow for drainage. Therefore water will be draining towards, and into the posts. What would the group recommend applying to the interior of the half lap joint to "delay" decay. My first thought was a petroleum based roofing tar product similar to what is applied to below grade concrete block and then a bead of silicone around the base of the post.
Anyone have alternative solutions or experiences?
Thanks, Dave
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depending on where you are in PA, theres a place called A and A Lumber Supply Co. in Avondale, PA. Lower SE corner of PA, almost in Delaware. I bought some cypress there a year or 2 ago, and paid something like $1.09 for 4/4 cypress. They specialize in it. Its not dried, but for your purpose, might work. They had all sizes, and would probably have what you are looking for.
Thier phone # is 610-268-3128.
The usual disclaimers apply.
Drew
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Maybe a steel post similar to the corner posts for chain link fence and then trim it with wood to hide it.
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Zimmer wrote:
<snip>

I'm being a little bit of a smart ass but do you have access to locust posts?
Also known as Ironwood in some parts of the country.
Those posts will still be in the ground when the rest of the house turns into compost.
BTW, there is a reason it is known as ironwood.
First time you try to cut a piece you'll know why<G>.
Been there, done that.
Lew
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I'd explore flashing the posts with aluminum to divert the runoff around/over the posts.
Assuming the posts stop at or below the tops of the rim joist: Once the rim joist and posts are in place flash over the top of the rim joist and post and put a little kick-out on the flashing to form a drip edge that diverts the water from the post.
Assuming the posts extend beyond the rim joist to form railing supports: A three sided flashing that goes around the post, over the top of the rim joist, and down over the top of the post, again with the kick-out, should do the trick.
John
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Your building supply yard has a brush on product especially for cut ends of treated lumber.
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Have you considered the artificial redwood/plastic decking materials? Now includes posts and railings as well as decking including 4X4s.
--
Chipper Wood
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