Molding Profile Help

I am trying to figure out the name of a type of molding profile. I believe it was used years ago to hide joints in paneling before tee strips. In profile it looks like 1/4th a dowel if it were sliced straight not like a quarter round. They were about an inch and a half wide and only maybe 3/16" thick and did not have a flat top. I want to put it over a edge of a mitered corner for a rounded surface. The clerk at the HD store wanted to sell me a batten which is flat on top.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Any time you have such a question Google then click on the Images link at the top of the results page.
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=profiles+molding
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Like a gently domed (rather than a profiled) astragal molding?
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

S:
"Astragal", as a molding profile, was new on me. The word "Astragalus" is in the head regarding ankles and the plant genus Astragalus which has an informative write-up at the given URL. How a molding got the name is a bit of a puzzle.
http://www.swcoloradowildflowers.com/White%20Enlarged%20Photo%20Pages/astragalus%20bisulcatus%20and%20haydenianus.htm
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/22/2011 7:43 PM, Edward Hennessey wrote:

http://www.swcoloradowildflowers.com/White%20Enlarged%20Photo%20Pages/astragalus%20bisulcatus%20and%20haydenianus.htm
An astragal is a piece of molding or moulding that goes between double doors, usually where one door is fixed and one is operable. It becomes the jamb for the operable door, so to speak. Usually referred to as a "T astragal".
HTH
--
Robert Allison
New Braunfels, TX
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

RA:
Gotcha and thanks for the education.
With recall of "finish line", I hope you got a chance to prowl the PDF of the inventions treatment previously mentioned. It was ingeniousness chapter and verse when I read it.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/23/2011 11:47 PM, Edward Hennessey wrote:

Yes, I have been perusing it and a lot of other sites.
Thanks,
--
Robert Allison
New Braunfels, TX
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Robert:
My pleasure. Your decision will be illuminating.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 22 Apr 2011 17:43:34 -0700, "Edward Hennessey"

Funny. I've always (wrongly, I see) pronounced that "astralagus". The moulding is likely named for the bi-sulcate seedpod end profile. (bottom picture on the right in the black background)
-- Accept the pain, cherish the joys, resolve the regrets; then can come the best of benedictions - 'If I had my life to live over, I'd do it all the same.' -- Joan McIntosh
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

LJ:
How someone decided to make that connection in nominating the molding still puzzles when other inventions might have sparked a more familiar connection.
As to the pronunciation, the erroneous form you cite is one I've seen spelled out and pronounced before. Google shows the error as far more infrequent than my experience would have ever guessed.
The form of the bone, compact and durable, makes it a frequent intact survivor in turbid fossil deposits where more slender and longer elements are only represented by broken parts or shards. Of some interest, the word goes to the same root meaning as hazard:"dice" with the theory being that the bone found ancient use in gaming.
Roll them bones.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 23 Apr 2011 21:40:47 -0700, "Edward Hennessey"

No doubt it was some silly gardener who made it, perhaps in his weekly article in the local rag.

Right, the list of misspellers even includes some of the major vitamin makers.

Weren't they first made from bone, Ed? (Oh, from the wiki) "Dice were probably originally made from the ankle bones (specifically the talus or "astragalus") of hoofed animals (such as oxen), colloquially known as "knucklebones", which are approximately tetrahedral (hence the slang term "bones" used for dice)."
-- Make up your mind to act decidedly and take the consequences. No good is ever done in this world by hesitation. -- Thomas H. Huxley
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

LJ:
Smoking that old-time locoweed maybe.

Which mutual observation at least gives me great faith in the assurance of the efficacy of their product. "I don't want the aspirin. Give me the asprin. That's the rare stuff. It's so hard to find."

This is an IIRC distillation from the old fire of dusty neurons. I think the game framing their use was one more of skill mixed with chance than throwing more nearly-balanced dice. Generally, an astragalus has two long, broader sides. There may be plenty of exceptions in what our predecessors used. Thrown wild style, the bone in my conception should be more prone to finish up/down on one of these long faces. Marks of flowers have been found, however, on the adjacent sides. Flowers=blooming=prettygood=growing season, you win! Perhaps.
So, one theory would be the gamers more difficultly, more skillfully, tried to roll them so that less-stable marked side came up. Sure, there's plenty of indeterminacy in the mix--but if there was an added rule that the bone/die had to pass a distant line or hit a target to count and show the flowered awkward side--there's the art...if acclamation recognizes one player as an artist you don't want to play against.
Remember those Summer evenings lagging pennies at a curb pitching for a leaner that had the head facing you? Ever run across a cat who could hustle that? Maybe it could have been akin. Who knows? If trials have been done with the artifacts, someone wrote a paper. This isn't my focus.I don't know. You read and I bet we'll gather at the camp fire with itching ears.
From my random file, here's a guy who ought to have an opinion as he has a real nifty, compact collection. People marrying enthusiasm with intelligence on the web are often quite forthcoming in response to questions:
http://www.dicecollector.com/JM /
Regards,
Edward Hennessey

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Probably Poison Ivy. ;)

It must be nice to collect things that are so small. Sigh.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

RDJ:
Probably Poison Ivy. ;)
Here's bit of bushcraft you'll thankfully praise if you have the right occasion: put a piece of cotton in your ear when trekking tick country.

It must be nice to collect things that are so small. Sigh.
A friend had one of the top two worldwide collections of Pacific Ocean fish otoliths (ear bones). Recollection imagines it occupied 1.5 file cabinets. Then there's psammophily, or sand collecting to entertain and excuse travelilng: http://www.google.com/#q=%22sand+collectors%22&hl=en&prmd=ivns&ei ctTfyBBcH88AamhvW5CQ&start=0&sa=N&fp=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&cad=b
But if you collect steam engines....
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Do you mean bead board? If so you can amke it yourself with a beading bit.
Sctoll down this page to see a profile of bead board http://www.americanbeadboard.com/?gclid=CMqj7O_1sKgCFQxvbAod1y69HA

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Do you mean bead board? If so, you can make your own with a beading bit.
Scroll down this page to see a bead board profile. http://www.americanbeadboard.com/?gclid=CMqj7O_1sKgCFQxvbAod1y69HA

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gary Ober wrote:

Finger nail. You can make it with a finger nail bit or a half round/bull nose one using only part of the arc.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 22 Apr 2011 11:29:20 -0700 (PDT), Gary Ober

Maybe you can find what you seek here: http://www.hardwoodweb.com/moulding/profiles.cfm I was thinking "half round" from your description, but I think you want a slice off a 4" dowel for that.
-- Accept the pain, cherish the joys, resolve the regrets; then can come the best of benedictions - 'If I had my life to live over, I'd do it all the same.' -- Joan McIntosh
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.