Molding Pine

Was in my local lumber dealer, one that actually sells purpleheart!
Anyways, they had something called molding pine. It was clear, and came in 4/4, 5/4 and 6/4.
I think it's just another term for clear pine. The guy at the desk was busy so I didn't ask what it was, but I did a Google and I couldn't find that term used for clear pine.
Anybody got a idea?
I'm looking for clear pine and this might due.
M.
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On Apr 25, 7:15 pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Without a picture (and probably even with one) it would be nearly impossible to know what you have. Lumber yards call out woods to be anything they want it to be these days, especially the stuff that comes from South America.
I would be truly surprised if you had access to any amount of clear pine in 6/4, and even more so if it was a source you could go back to over and over.
I have a friend that goes all over N. America and into S. America to buy woods for specialty buyers. According to him, the non USA pine molding wood we see these days is a South American semi hardwood that is widely considered an undesirable tree. This can be seen by looking at the growth rings on the wood. The rings are wide and far apart, and the dark rings are thick and really hard. The same stuff is widely used in one form or another to make the preprimed finger-joint moldings we see everywhere.
Where you live in the USA will dictate what woods are readily available to you and what their affordability will be. My brother in law is from the Ohio valley, and he tells me they often burn maple, cherry and walnut in their fireplaces that they pick up after storms. That stuff is like gold here in South Texas. Yet, as a woodturner, my northern forum members where shocked we use mesquite and live oak to barbecue as well as in the fireplace.
If you can get the clear stuff, I would grab a bunch as any clear woods are getting quite scarce.
Robert
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Your comments on "imported pine" could well explain this "molding pine" but I have to wonder how it could be economical. People give pine away here for outdoor stove use and unless the logs are large and mostly clear the sawyers generally don't bother with it as nobody wants to buy unless it is... or unless they have an order for dimension lumber for building construction. I don't know where the OP is so things may be different there...
That said, I ended up finding nice pine at a saw mill... 8/4" x 16" x 8' up to 8/4" x 19.5" x 8' air dried for a bit over 3 years. I got 4 boards and that didn't make a noticeable difference in the sawyer's pile. Very nice stuff and the price was very tolerable. This was especially true when compared to the stuff the big box stores and local lumber yards have had. Even the 19.5" board is straight and the maximum cupping is about 1/8" across the width and the other three are less than that.. Two of the boards don't have a single knot and the other two have some knots that, for my project, will result in no more than about a 5-8% loss as the knot's positions allow me to still get the lengths I need. If I'd needed all clear boards, with a bit of digging the pile would have yielded them. I'm sure I'll be going back there as I need to trim out my house... fire up the molder and shaper!
John
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On 4/26/2012 4:43 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Pecan and Hickory routinely go in the same stack in just about any lumber yard that handles hardwoods ...
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On 4/26/2012 9:00 AM, Swingman wrote:

Yeah, and they're NOT the same.
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On 4/26/2012 9:18 AM, Steve Turner wrote:

My maternal grandfather had a sawmill outside Basille, Louisiana and I remember them hauling hickory and pecan logs into the same stack before it ever got to the mill, so I guess you can't blame the lumber yard ... but they sure know about it.
<Didn't we have this discussion before?> :)
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On 4/26/2012 9:29 AM, Swingman wrote:

A-yup, but hey, this is the wreck, isn't it? :-)
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On 4/26/12 9:44 AM, Steve Turner wrote:

At least they were smart enough not to stack them with oak.
KA-BOOOOOOOOM!!!!!!!
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On 4/26/2012 9:48 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

Quercusoxide induced capacitance is indeed a little known shop hazard ... but, have no fear ... soon to be addressed by Gass' patented FaradStop.
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Don't you DARE try to hide the Oak Rust cavitation problem from us, you cagey Cajun. Spit it out, like a man.
-- Believe nothing. No matter where you read it, Or who said it, Even if I have said it, Unless it agrees with your own reason And your own common sense. -- Buddha
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On 4/25/2012 7:15 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

More than likely pine that would specifically be good for use as a molding. It very well could be a self named material for a product that their customers requested.
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