Molding insert for table saw?


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I was looking in my craftsman catalog and saw you can buy somethign called a molding insert that allows you to make moldings on a table saw. They also had a "planer/joiner" insert. Can I use that to joint the edge of boards?
How can I tell what saws those inserts will work on? I am looking ot maybe buy a better used table saw. How can I tell if one of these will fit it and what should I look for in a used saw?
Thanks!
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stryped wrote:

A molding head should work on any saw that has an arbor diameter it will fit. It is advisable that the insert plate have an opening width sufficient to accommodate the cutters. Before turning on the saw, I mean :)
You could use planer cutters to edge join a board but... 1. the board would have to be stood on its side 2. you'd have to rig something the same thickness as the cut to support the outfeed portion of the board.
IOW, why? It is just worlds easier to edge join on a router table...as was explained to you at length some time ago.
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dadiOH
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I know, I just cant get the router table to work on edge jointing good enough for glue ups. dadiOH wrote:

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It was also suggested to you to use a hand held router and strait edge. Can't miss.

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stryped wrote:

Figure out why.
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because I have a cheap router table that does not have a split fence. dadiOH wrote:

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No, that's not why. The reason is that you never bothered to try/follow the explicit instructions given you as to how to do it without a split fence (by "split" I'm assuming you mean one in which infeed/outfeed sides are independently adjustable for and aft), without a router table at all...even without a router.
One thing I guarantee...if you buy that joiner from another thread (or any other joiner) you'll still be unable to join your boards.
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stryped wrote:

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WHy do you say that? dadiOH wrote:

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stryped wrote:

I've got one, and after playing with it a few times, it's been sitting in my Table Saw Bits Box ever since. Much like it did when my father owned it for something like 10 years before me.
It's kind of neat. I tried the edger thingy, but it wasn't as effective as a good blade at giving a smooth rip. The most useful bits I have for it are the tongue and groove inserts. They're actually pretty good, but for me to make anything actually look good with 'em, I'll probably have to make a jig to hold the boards upright nicely so they feed properly.
I've found that between my router and regular table saw blades the molding blade thing is just unnecessary.
-Nathan
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They will work on Craftsman saws. Different saw manufacturers use different cutouts in the table. Actually, you can make your own inserts quite easily. Jim

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Check this out ( no affiliation )
http://corobcutters.com/index.php
Jim wrote:

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Yes the planer/joiner works, although not nearly as quick and easy as a real joiner.

Most molding cutters will work in a variety of tablesaws. Make certain that the arbor sizes match. Another note: Molding cutters, like dado cutters, need to be used with extra safety care.
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I've got one of those old Craftsman molding heads. It will fit on most any saw that will accept a dado blade. I couldn't see using one an anyting smaller or less powerful than a normal contractor's saw. It is usually necessary (IME, YMMV) to make a few passes at increasing depth to complete a molding, depending on the exact profile you are aiming for. As far as the planer/jointer insert, a standard tablesaw blade can do an excellent job of edge jointing. Check any good tablesaw book for techniques.
You should be aware that the Craftsman molding heads, as well as the Delta, use steel cutters, not carbide. There is a more modern design called a Magic Molder (I believe that is the name) that uses an aluminum disk with carbide cutters. Seems like a nice setup but was kind of pricey as I recall.
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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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