Moisture content for low RH home?

I'm building a big library for a client who keeps his home in the winter at 20-25% relative humidity (RH). In the summer he says it's around 50% -- which is fine -- but will I run into problems if I deliver the cabinetry at the low RH? I know the finish will temper the wood's gain or loss of moisture, but the extremely low RH concerns me.
BTW it'll be built of cherry.
Rick
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wrote:

Only if you offend the cross grain gluing god.
Just this morning checked some of my early furniture pieces at the point in my woodworking life where I ignored the laws of cross grain gluing and offended the gods. Cracks are at their widest point currently, but will disappear by summer. :~)
Frank
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Frank Boettcher wrote:

There are other issues than just gluing...if you're using stained/coloured solid wood panels then make sure you stain/colour the panel before assembly so that if the panel shrinks the newly visible bits are also stained.
If you build at the low RH (and the wood is fully acclimatized to the lower RH) then this won't be a problem as the panel will be basically as small as it ever gets. Otherwise, it should be considered.
I can see this issue with my kitchen cabinet doors right now...they must have been made in the summer.
Chris
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On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 12:21:48 -0600, Chris Friesen

Yep, made all my bathroom cabinets in the summer, can currently see that line, been meaning to touch that up........oh, well, Spring's right around the corner......but I better take down that bathroom door and plane the edge so I can close it this summer.....
Frank
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wrote:

Just take a good, hot shower with the window closed.. ;-]
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
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Thanks for all your info. I have decided to invest in a dehumidifier for the shop, just in case!
I looked at the RH/moisture content charts and decided it should not be a problem. By the time the piece goes in, spring will be around the corner and the RH of the house will be on the rise - the cherry won't feel the effect much if at all.
Another insurance against problems: I bought quartersawn cherry for the door panels, drawer fronts and countertop. Should look pretty nice!
Rick
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cromwell wrote:

According to Hoadley, for relative humidity varying between 25% and 50%, you're looking at an equilibrium moisture content for typical wood species varying between 5% and 9%.
For black cherry in the tangential dimension you're looking at roughly 1% change in size. In the radial dimension it'll be about half that.
Plan appropriately for wood movement, and you should be fine.
Chris
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Indoors relative humidity in Winter is normally 20-30% in North Carolina where I am. It's not "keeping it at ...", it is that low because of the lower outdoor temperatures. Colder air cannot hold much moisture and so when you bring it indoors and heat it up, it is generally very dry. The colder the outside air, the drier the indoors air will be.
I concur with the others: Build it with attention to crossgrain issues and you should be fine.
-G

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