MLCS Router Plate


Sorry for the noob questions...
While in the process of purchasing some MLCS Router bits, I saw they had a router plate kit for only $35.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)55070250/ref=sr_1_13/002-5151279-3288009?ie=UTF8&s=hi
I DAGS and didn't turn up anything here in the group about this product, so I am wondering if anyone has any experience with it?
I have never used a router in a table before, how do you adjust the height? Seems like it would be rather cumbersome to reach under the table to use the router height adustment...
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I have used a Phenolic Plastic plate before and I found it alright. The problem is that it won't be perfectly flat so your work will kinda tetter totter if it is high in the middle. This is not that big a deal, but I didn't like it so I got a router lift with a machined aluminum plate that is perfectly flat, but about 10 times the cost.
I could probably find my old one if you are interested in paying $20 plus shipping for it. It is already drilled for mounting a PC 690 router.
Gary
On Tue, 8 Aug 2006 16:53:59 -0400, "Locutus"

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I haven't used a plate insert for a router table (my table is home-made from a chunk of leftover countertop). However, if you look around, it doesn't seem like $35 is really a special deal for a phenolic plate. For example, Rockler has a polycarbonate plate for $17, and an aluminum one (1/4" thick) for $50. Lee Valley has an interesting phenolic plate for $31.50. Shop around - Woodcraft, Amazon, etc. Whatever way you go, I think you'll be pleasantly surprised at the increased usefulness, cleanliness (with dust collection thru fence), and safety of routing in a table. Good luck, Andy
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As far as adjusting height, I just reach under the table. Little bit of a pain, but it's a lot cheaper than buying a router lift. Do test cuts to make sure height is right. Some plunge routers have the option of "through-the-table" height adjustments - I think one of the mags (Wood or Pop Woodworking, I think) just did a review of some of these. Good luck, Andy
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Locutus wrote:

1. Lift the router out of the table, set height, put router back. Ditto to change bits.
2. Reach under table to adjust height
3. Spend $$ varying from "quite a bit" to " you gotta be kidding" for a router lift.
--

dadiOH
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Thanks, that's what I figured it would be.
After doing some research, this product looks like a good comprimise between an expensive lift and method you are describing:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)55131821/ref=pd_bbs_1/002-5151279-3288009?ie=UTF8
The user reviews from Amazon are pretty positive.
Anyone here have any experience with this product?
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Locutus wrote:

_13/002-5151279-3288009?ie=UTF8&s=hi
My router has the plunger springs removed for ease of height adjustment under the table.
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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Using a router in table will change your entire woodworking life compared to using the router handheld.
You can have a router table VERY quickly by mounting your router directly to a small piece of MDF. Remove your base and bolt the router directly after boring a decent size hole.
Make your fence from a "straight" piece of 2x4.
Set the entire thing on saw horses and start routing.
You will be amazed at the new control and accuracy you will have.
You will then decide to build a "proper" router table and that is just the beginning......
Here is "cheater" version of a beginner table...
http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/etip040700wb.html
Locutus wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)55070250/ref=sr_1_13/002-5151279-3288009?ie=UTF8&s=hi
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Pat Barber wrote:

_13/002-5151279-3288009?ie=UTF8&s=hi
Pity the guy never thought about making the fence adjustable ie on steel bars so that wood of different thicknesses can be passed through. But then again alls it takes is ingenuity on the constructers part. ;-)
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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