Mixing UF Glue (Unibond)

I've been using Unibond 800 in small batches (4 ounces or so) for lamination work. Mixing by hand in a plastic cup with a wooden stick (tongue depressor) has been sufficient. This morning, I had occasion to mix a much larger batch - 20 ounces. It seems like mixing a batch this large by hand is a bad idea. I worked at it for a good 10 minutes, but there were still a lot of lumps of the catalyst in the glue. When I rolled the glue out, those lumps crushed out and became really obvious as white slotches in the brownish glue. I hope it doesn't affect this project.
Maybe mixing in smaller batches is a good idea. But is there a reasonable way to mix a large batch and not have this happen?
Thanks.
--
Art Greenberg
artg at eclipse dot net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When I mix Unibond I gradually add the powder to the liquid in small amounts while stirring with an old kitchen wire whisk.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You can also modify the wire whisk so you can chuck it in an electric drill. OK, I confess, I'm too cheap to buy a mixer and DO use this in the kitchen.
Art commented about mixing Unibond in large batches:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Art Greenberg" wrote:

Slowly add dry to liquid while mixing.
Without question, best mixer available is the "Jiffy Mixer" made here in SoCal.
Chuck one up in a drill and go to work.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 9 Aug 2007 10:15:36 -0700, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Cool! Found them on the web. I had no idea there was a deivce like that available for mixing in small containers. Thanks for tip, Lew.
--
Art Greenberg
artg at eclipse dot net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We use it a bunch at work and I've had the same problem. What I do now is put all of the powder and about 1/3 of the liquid into the mixing cup and stir it until it's nice and creamy. Then I add the rest of the liquid and stir it until mixed. I've found that to be the quickest and easiest way for me.
We're actually using a new product now that uses water as a catalyst (?). It smells a whole lot better and the results are seemingly identical. I can't think of the brand name right now. Wait - it's PPR and it's a precatalyzed powder urea resin adhesive. It says that water is needed to reconstitute the powder resin. IAE, I haven't done any research as to which is "better", but I prefer the PPR thus far.
JP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 09 Aug 2007 15:02:58 -0700, Jay Pique wrote:

OK ... so its able to dissolve the catalyst at that high concentration. Good to know.

I have some of that, too. I haven't tried it yet. Should have used it on this project. But I have half a gallon of the Unibond yet, and it doesn't have an infinite shelf life.
More than the smell, I find the UF bothers my eyes a little, even with fair ventilation. I use a respirator. SWMBO can't stand to be in the shop when I'm using it, even when she has her respirator on.
--
Art Greenberg
artg at eclipse dot net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Art Greenberg" wrote:

SFWIW, Chucked up a 1 gal Jiffy in a 3/8" variable speed drill, then added a foot switch and a wooden bracket screwed into a wall.
Now have a foot operated mixer that works just like a milk shake mixer.
Mixed up over 400 gallons of epoxy to build a boat with it.
Have fun.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.