Mitering with the Disk Sander

A few months ago I added a 12" disk sander to my collection of sanders and while I thought it would be one of those luxury sanders, I have found that it has already seen more action than my OS Spindle sander that I have had for 2 plus years. I had an on site job in January that required lots of random length trim to be added to a some kitchen cabinets. I took my miter saw and my 12" disk sander. I cut the piece of trim close and tweaked with the sander. The resulting miters came out perfect with no splintering or tear out. Yesterday I visited the same customer to add 7" diameter columns between his dining room and living room. More trim was used to match the shoe moldings on the oak floors and again I used the 12" disk sander to make all the miters. This time however I left the miter saw at home and took my Milwaukee jig saw to get close on the lengths. With 80 grip paper on the sander I was able to miter 1/2" x3/4" Oak shoe molding faster and with much nicer results than using the miter saw. Sanding 45 degree bevels on the oak moldings is quick and accurate. Next time you have short pieces to miter you might consider the disk sander for a safer and accurate alternative.
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Already do, but owners of the lesser models with a simple rod and pressed trunnions are best advised to go to a human-powered shooting board.
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George wrote:

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I would have thought that doing the final adjustment on the miter saw would have been more accurate and faster, assuming the blade was sharp enough to not tear the wood, proper backer board, etc. I'm surprised you were able to get those results with the 7" columns! I'll definitely have to consider that next time.
-- Dekker www.WoodworkDetails.com
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Understand that the shoe moldings went around The Square base and capitols and this is a rather heavy bench top 12" disk sander.
That said however I have cut plenty of 2" long shoe moldings and with a miter saw it gets dicey when working off the tail gate of the truck and not all your hold downs and clamps are available. The cut pieces often fly in all directions. Also consider, you sand to the pencil or scribed line rather than work for the blade to hit the mark. Kick back is very unlikely. You are not likely to cut any body parts off. Best of all, the NOISE level is reduced dramatically.
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Leon wrote: > A few months ago I added a 12" disk sander to my collection of sanders and > while I thought it would be one of those luxury sanders, I have found that > it has already seen more action than my OS Spindle sander that I have had > for 2 plus years. <snip>
You have just discovered what every boat builder knows.
A 12" disk sander is just about the most important tool you can have for finish work on a boat.
BTW, Bingham shows how to build one with basically left overs.
Lew
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Well I am certainly glad that I am well preceded with this discovery. ;~)
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OK, on a side note. Since you apparently have this style sander also, what grit do you prefer? I think mine came with 80 and that piece still looks new. I picked up a 120 thinking I would change it out but have not yet. I was thinking also of cutting the center out of a 12" 120 and a 80 grit disk so that you end up with a 8" diameter hole in the center of both disks. Stick the 12", 80 grit ring on the disk and the 8", 120 grit circle in the center of the 80 grit ring. The result hopefully would give you a fast cutting outer ring and a smoother cutting inner circle. Have you ever heard of that?
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Leon wrote: > OK, on a side note. Since you apparently have this style sander also, what > grit do you prefer?
Think of this tool as an abrasive cutting, not a finishing device.
Haven't looked in a while, but think they are 50-60 grit disks.
Use PSA disks from Klingspor, which, BTW, is a total PITA unless you use the tool at least weekly to keep the cement working.
Trying to mix two different grits on the same disk just seems like a lot of work for little return.
No proof, just gut feel.
Lew
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Ok, now to have a little fun, try adding a foot peddle. You won't believe how much faster your work will go. Lou
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That is what I have been using it for however I actually bought it with the idea of sanding smooh the box joint corners on small boxes. Hoping to not round the corners over as is the case when using the finish sander or ROS.
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Leon wrote:
> That is what I have been using it for however I actually bought it with the > idea of sanding smooh the box joint corners on small boxes. Hoping to not > round the corners over as is the case when using the finish sander or ROS.
Doubt the grit would make much difference on a box joint, but if you can justify the dedicated set up, I'd probably consider building a dedicated disk sander using 100 grit along with a jig to clamp the box and keep it square for the final finish sanding.
Even with a disk sander, you will either round over the corners or not get a square finish, if you try to free hand.
Lew
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