Mitered Half-Laps

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On Mon, 29 Mar 2010 22:57:25 -0400, the infamous "Ed Pawlowski"

Here, you two: www.motel6.com They left the light on for ya.
-- Everything I did in my life that was worthwhile I caught hell for. -- Earl Warren
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On Sat, 27 Mar 2010 12:35:49 -0700, the infamous "Lew Hodgett"

My thoughts exactly. I'd have mounted the board in a jig and used a much larger bit with guide to take it at the line, then quickly pare off the rest of the field in 1/10th the time and effort. <shrug>
A tenon jig would have been a whole lot quicker, too, including building the 45-degree tenoning jig. ;)
-- "Not always right, but never uncertain." --Heinlein -=-=-
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On 3/27/10 10:50 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Larry, honestly, I try to like you but when you write these juvenile little action scripts, <shrug> <sigh> etc., it come across as very condescending and immature.

How about you guys take some videos and post them.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On Sat, 27 Mar 2010 23:41:28 -0500, the infamous -MIKE-

Well, my posts are not intended to be that way. <shrug> When you detect a whole lot of facetiousness in a post, consider it humor, eh?

No camera, and far too much crap in the shop to take pics of it. =:0
-- "Not always right, but never uncertain." --Heinlein -=-=-
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On 3/28/10 7:01 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

It's all good. peace
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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wrote:

Thanks to all that checked out the video! Like I said at the end, there are a half-dozen other ways to do this, but this is my preferred. I sincerely appreciate your feedback. --with the exception of one mean dude. :^(
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On Sun, 28 Mar 2010 06:44:58 -0700 (PDT), GarageWoodworks

I really like your videos and have learned a lot from them (and will review them as needed ;). I too was disappointed in the "sneak up on" advice. That's the part that always bites me. The jig is a fantastic idea (a hint on how to make them would be nice) and I'll steal that part, however I'll do my best to figure out a way around the "sneak up on" part.
IS there a reason you used such a small router bit? It would seem like a 1/2" bit in a 3/4" bushing, or some such, would be easier and give a known "sneak up" factor.
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Those are the same questions I have. Why sneak up rather than make the line the first cut?
And the small bit had me pondering too.
The jigs are great, but I don't really get the rest of the technique. It seems to me with a bit more thought they could be modified to eliminate the sneaking...
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On Mar 28, 1:34pm, Dave Balderstone

I don't own the appropriate guide bushing. Would love to hear any suggestions regarding the sneaking up other than "use an indexing pin". Where would you put an indexing pin?
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In article

I'd be tempted to add a hold-down clamp to the jig, align the piece to cut to your line (so the size of the bushing becomes irrelevant), clamp it in place, and go from there.
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On Mar 28, 3:25pm, Dave Balderstone

That would certaintly make things easier. You'd have to add a clamp at either end of the jig (remember I used both sides). Thanks for the tip.
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On Sun, 28 Mar 2010 11:01:28 -0700 (PDT), GarageWoodworks

Oh, I thought bushings came is sets of every reasonable size. For small parts, how about a stop on the back edge of the jig with a spacer equal to the radii of the bushing-bit? Align the stop block to the distance from the cut to be opposite end and add the spacer to push the work the proper distance (further) into the bit.
Or, perhaps for larger pieces, or where the opposite end isn't yet finished, marks on the jig placed radius(bushing)-radius(bit) apart. Clamp and have at it.
...just thinking. I really do like the jigs, though. Do you make them at one time and then cut in half?
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On Mar 28, 3:53pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Yes, they do come in sets. And, no, they do not contain every size bushing you will ever need. Aside from differing in diameter, they also differ in height. My larger diameter bushings are too tall (it would hit the stock).

You would need to be able to remove it when doing the opposite side and be able to put in a second one for the other half-lap. Remember the same jig is used twice. One for the 45 half-lap and one for the 90 half-lap.
Plus your solution would only work for short stock. My train table stock shown in the video was quite long.

This sounds a little better.
IMHO, I think 'we' are making to much of the "sneaking up" on it maneuver. There's nothing to it. This isn't brain surgery. :^)

I made them several years ago and I honestly don't remember. I would make them independently to make things easier (probably what I did).
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On 3/28/10 6:22 PM, GarageWoodworks wrote:

I had that problem when I got my dovetail jig, so I cut the sumbench down. I used the bandsaw and then the disc sander.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Not a bad solution. I would be tempted to do that, but I don't make mitered half laps often enough. They are fun to make though.

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On Mar 28, 1:24pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

yes, I don't own the guide bushing I needed for the larger bit. The other large guide bushings that I do own were to tall and extended above my 1/2 mdf jig.
I'm sure there must be a way around sneaking up on it and would to hear of any working solutions. Thanks!

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wrote:

HI Brian,
Thanks for the posting. You have a great website. Are your videos on you tube?
Charlie
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Thanks Charlie! Yes, aside from being on my webpage they are also on Youtube. I have a Youtube channel.
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My Youtube channel is here:

http://www.youtube.com/user/GarageWoodworks

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On Tue, 30 Mar 2010 15:42:26 -0700 (PDT), the infamous

Speaking of videos, Charlie, why don't you have a video of your bench going up and down?
-- May those who love us, love us; And may those that don't love us, May God turn their hearts; And if he doesn't turn their hearts, may he turn their ankles, So we'll know them by their limping. --old Gaelic blessing
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