Miter slot in router table


Hi,
I am building a new router table and was wondering if I should include a miter slot in the top. I have not used the one in my old table very much, but that is probably because my old table really sucks and I don't use it for much of anything.
Do you use your router table miter slots a lot? Would some sort of sled referencing off the fence be just as good. Is there a downside to having a miter slot in a router table?
The top will be 1.5 inch MDF with high pressure laminate on both sides, and edge banded in walnut. (it's what I have currently available).
Thanks for your input.
MikeG
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I use the slot only for attaching feather boards. I do not use a sled but do use a piece of plywood about 10" square to push some pieces through.
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I use the miter slot in my router table all the time, mainly for featherboards, but even use a variety of "sleds" to handle smaller pieces parts, etc.
John

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MikeG wrote:

sometimes I even use a miter gauge to hold the work piece, but more often than not, I just back the workplace with a wider board.
Dave
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I wouldn't. Alternative =
http://www.patwarner.com/images/mitergage.jpg
Trap blade between to pieces of MDF, no need for slot.
http://www.patwarner.com = Routers
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Pat What is the advantage of the setup in the photo or conversely the disadvantage of a routed slot and track. Doesn't this setup reduce the bit height capacity. I installed a miter track for feather boards and finger joint jigs, I haven't seen any down side to it being there. Table 1 1/2" with router lift installed. Thanks Joe

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The advantage of the set up in the photo very minimally is that the slot in the picture stays parallel to the fence. A regular fixed slot is a bear to have parallel to the fence.
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No, but it has been used.
How many hours are you going to put into making the table? How much longer will it take you to add the miter slot?
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slots weaken the table, making a point where it can flex. they gather shavings and crap and are a place where your board can snag. since the cutting action is rotary rather than linear there is no particular reason for the slot to be better than the fence as a reference line for jigs. I make my router table sleds to straddle the whole table and reference both edges, using neither slots (which there are none) or the fence, which I remove entirely for the purpose.
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i use it for featherboards and my coping sled. The top to my table is 1.75" thick. I doubt a 3/8" deep dado is going to weaken it in any way enough to cause flex. It hasn't going on 5 years with a PC 7518 hanging under it.
Mike

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Thanks for the input.
MikeG.
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When I made mine (same basic construction as you're describing), I opted to leave it out for several reasons. First, I didn't use the one in my old table, and never really thought of a good use for it. Second, it made the old table (which was only a sheet of 3/4" ply) really prone to bouncing and bending- and I didn't want my good one to do that. Third, I laminated both sides (in my case, I used ply, not MDF) to make sure that humidity fluxuations affected both sides equally, and I didn't want to undo that effect by compromising the surface- of course putting the hole for the plate in does just that, but it goes all the way though, so both sides are affected in roughly the same way. And fourth- and this one is the most important- I have a router, it's a nice flat surface, and there is already a fence right there- which means if I change my mind later, I can route the dado for the miter slot in about ten seconds- it makes a lot more sense for me to wait on it until I know I need it for something, especially since the retrofit it so easy.
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