Miter Saw Kickback

I have a new Delta 12" miter saw. It cuts like butter on a straight cut, but I get a vicious kickback on a 45 degree miter. What could be causing that? I am holding the work firmly against the fence.
I am a little spooked about using it. Any tips on how to prevent it would be appreciated.
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fence on both sides of the blade? I was nibbling off a little piece, but maybe I need to change how I cut.
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On Sat, 24 Apr 2004 10:22:40 -0500, "Buck Turgidson"

my 10" delta does the same thing. after close inspection i found it was the fences not being coplaner? i put a strait edge across them and fouund they had a gap in the middle. no real fix other than addding sacraficial fences and shimed them in the gullet then attacked with screws. just another case of delta getting cheaper all the time.
skeez
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skeezics wrote:

I thought it was me. Had to shim and flatten my Delta to get it to work right. And yeah, that kickback will wake you right up. Dave in Fairfax
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Buck in Fairfax.
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"Buck Turgidson" wrote in message

Surprised you are getting this when "nibbling" at a short end that doesn't touch both fences, as that is usally one remedy for stopping similar kick back situations, particularly with stock that is not perfectly straight on a "slider".
In your case, I would definitely be carefully checking the blade, fence, and table alignment .. thoroughy reading the manual, and putting in a call to Delta, just to be on the safe side.
That said, the below may offer some tips, once you're sure that your saw, or saw alignment, is not at the root of your problem.
The culprit is the saw kerf closing up on the blade, particularly when fences on both sides of the blade are being used, and one or both pieces on either side of the cut move toward the fences during the cut, pinching the blade ... alleviate that possibility, and you generally alleviate the kickback.
This can be particularly nasty with sliding miter saws when the blade is being pushed into the stock and you are unaware of the possibility.
Not uncommon also with long, unjointed, or bowed/warped stock that does not touch both the left and right fences throughout their plane.
Planning your cuts so that the cut off side is short enough so that the stock doesn't sit against both fences, will often alleviate the problem with prone stock and a properly aligned saw.
When working with long stock that may be prone to kickback of this type, or on the initial cut of a long piece, try making the cut at 90 degrees, and straight down, a la "chop saw", instead of pushing the blade through the stock, a la "slider.
When cutting wide boards with a slider, and where I know there is a danger of this type kick back, I'll often start the cut at the back, fence side, with a "chop" cut, then go back and slide through the cut from the front, or, If you sense there will be a problem, you may decide to make successive "chops" through the entire cut. .. this will often alleviate, or soften any kickback that does occur. You can then generally clean up the cut with a full slide through the piece without danger.
Above all, use a hold down to secure the stock, ALWAYS have the stock FIRMLY against the fence on the side you are holding it with your hand, and keep that hand, and all body parts, well away from the blade.
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"It works beautifilly as long as the work (in this case 3/4" oak quarter-rounds) touch both side of the fence. When I say nibbling, it was probably just shy of 1". I can successfully nibble kerf-size bites.
The manual talks about using an auxiliary fence for short pieces. I will try and make one when time permits. I got twin 20-mo boys, and they're itching go go out....
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"Buck Turgidson" wrote in message

Hod on, we may be talking at cross purposes here.
When you say "kickback" ... is the head of the saw kicking back or jumping toward you on the cut?
... If that is the case, then my previous post applies.
Or, is the saw throwing the small piece of the cutoff around the shop?
... Then, by all means, try an auxiliary fence. That may help the cutoff vibrating, or falling back into the spinning saw blade.
The latter is not really what I would call "kickback" on a miter saw. The first time _that_ happens to you, you will likely need a trip to check out your shorts.
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Guess my terminology was wrong. Yes, it the latter. Thanks for clarifying this for me. I bought a 1 x 6 and will mount it as a sac. fence tomorrow.
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Yeah, a sac. fence is the only way to go here. When you get down to the bottom of that cut, the little 1" piece is just vibrating around. It ends up catching the corner of one tooth, gets cranked crooked, ripped off, and sent flying. I usually just keep my body out of the blade line, but the right solution is a sacrificial fence.
Oh, and another poster said is 10" Delta fences couldn't be adjusted to coplanar, but I have the 12" PC, which is IDENTICLE to the 12" Delta (same company -- same saw). You can fully adjust the fences to get them coplanar. I loosened the fences, clamped a long straight board to both, then tightened them down.
-Mike
-Mike
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Make sure the fences are coplanar -- just parallel isn't good enough.
Make sure you're holding the piece that will have the acute angle on it (i.e. the "inside" of the cut). Holding the other side could push it into the blade.
Also, really short cuts will frequently send the small cutoff flying.
You need to rectify this soon -- my 12" CMS is the most used power tool in my shop.
-Mike
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