miter plane mouth size

A newbie question for sure. I've built my shooting board, and am trying it out with my bailey style planes. I'm not getting the results that I want even though I've sharpened the blades SS.
I've read about miter planes, and using low angle planes for this, but am left with one question: How important is it to narrow down the mouth opening when shooting end grain? I'd think it wouldn't be as important as when planing long grain. Is the large mouth opening on the Bailey's going to limit their usefulness for shooting along with all other applications?
TIA.
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John Griffin-Wiesner
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John Griffin-Wiesner wrote:

It's not critical, but I still like to be able to close down the mouth for shooting. If you have old Stanley/Baileys, you should be able to adjust the frog and/or put a thicker aftermarket iron in the plane to close the mouth up. (I substitute Hocks for most of my older Stanleys, and I've got a Samurai laminated iron in one.)
Personally, I always use a low-angle plane for shooting, and have excellent results. The low-angle plus the solid bedding add up to good endgrain work. Also, FWIW, even on endgrain you need to be aware of grain direction. You'll find that there is a "good" and "bad" direction.
So when you say that you aren't getting the results you want, is it just the surface isn't smooth, or is the plane chattering, or is it something else?
Chuck Vance
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Chattering. I haven't spent the time I need to on this yet. But I think I probably just need to take in the size of bite. Which brings us to the annoying slop in the adjustment screw. It seems that you have to screw it half the length of the bolt when changing direction.

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John Griffin-Wiesner wrote:

That's the most likely culprit. To work endgrain well you have to take a pretty light cut. Otherwise, your plane is likely to "hop and skip" (or chatter) across the wood as the iron engages and releases.

Ah yes ... backlash, the bane of all old Stanleys. I think you're pretty well stuck with that problem unless you buy a L-N or LV. They have managed to reduce the amount of backlash in their planes.
Having mentioned that, another potential problem comes to mind. Have you been making sure to finish all adjustments with the knob going forward? If not, it could be that the slop is causing the blade to give as you are trying to take a shaving. That could make for some less-than-satisfactory results.
Chuck Vance
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Or how about a woody? I prefer the idea of a quick tap or two with a hammer to fiddling around with a knob. (Am I starting to show my neander tendencies?)
So, who's figured out how to make a low-angle woody?

Yes. I have made a point of making sure the knob is tight forward.

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On Tue, 24 Aug 2004 19:33:31 GMT, John Griffin-Wiesner

Okay, you've stumped me. What's the complication in a wooden block plane that precludes making a low-angle version? Thickness of the wood beneath the iron?
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John Griffin-Wiesner wrote:

Don't worry, I won't tell. :-)

They've been made, but as you probably guessed, with a low-angle plane you'd reduce the amount of support/bedding. You'd likely get some flex or even run the risk of blowing out the sole.

I figured you probably had, but it's something that can easily be overlooked.
Chuck Vance
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John Griffin-Wiesner wrote:

Sounds like you may need to reset the frog placement to close the mouth and support the blade more, and take a shallower cut. A skewed cut may help as well.
Dave in Fairfax
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