miter lock router bits

One of my (not immediate) future projects is a couple of sofa tables. Each will be about 9' long, 16" wide. I plan on using black granite tile for the top supported by ply. The tile will be surrounded by a 3/4" mahogany frame approximately 3" wide. The aprons will also be 3/4" x 3"+- mahogany. I want something resembling a parson's table. Now the problem:...
I would like for the meeting edges of apron and frame to be mitered. I could use a 3/4 x 3/4 glue block on the inside of one or the other to keep them aligned while gluing but I'm thinking that getting that perfectly aligned to the mahogany could be problematic. Especially given the length.
My next thought was to run the already mitered edges on a miter lock router bit on a router table. I have never used one but it seems to me that it too could be problematic unless both apron and frame are perfectly straight and flat over the entire length. Another potential problem is the relative delicacy of the mitered edge...it would have to be used to guide on either the table of fence, depending upon which board was being routed. (I would NOT want to accomplish the miter itself with the router, just the interlocking part of the profile...the miter would have been done on a saw).
I've never had occasion to use one of these bits and would welcome input about their use. Ditto on alternative methods of joining frame to apron.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/31/2015 12:40 PM, dadiOH wrote:

edge of the top and the joint that joints the apron and top will mitered joint, probably a 45 degree joint.
Done perfectly it that joint looks great. If not perfectly the joint may not be close properly. Or the sharp edges of the joint at the corner would be easily dinged before, during and or after assembly.
IF your apron was backed off from the point/edge of the top miter point edge and attached say 1/8" shy of reaching the edge of the top you could plain or sand the top Point/Edge back to the face of the apron and essentially move the miter joint down from the top edge/corner of the top.
I could show you an illustration better than I can explain it. ;~) Zoom in on the joint.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/16225043970/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think so too :)

Yeah, that was/is my concern. Not so much after - or even during - assembly but before...using that sharp, delicate edge to guide on the surface of the router table surface or fence while cutting the locking profile.

Yeah, I've considered that, might wind up doing it. Sure would like a non-fudged miter joint though.

Shucks, Leon, I don' need no steenkin pitcher, your words are golden :)
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/31/15 12:40 PM, dadiOH wrote:

I bought one of those bits and stopped using it for a few reasons. 1. Everything has the be absolutely perfect for them to join correctly and they are a bit of a PITA to join and clamp. The gets exacerbated by length. 2. I determined they are pretty much a novelty and a solution to a problem that doesn't exist, because... 3. The are better joints and better joinery.
I'm having trouble picturing the joint your are trying to accomplish, due to ignorance and beer. :-) But perhaps a decorative spline might suit your needs.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Easy to picture...
1. 2 boards, each 3/4 x 3 x 108 2. miter one long edge of each 3. join the mitered edges so the boards are at 90 degrees to each other
Beer worn off yet? :)
A spline could work; basically, that is what a lock miter bit makes. Biscuits could work too. The problem with all of them is getting everything to line up perfectly over a considerable distance, Hmm...naybe I should consider veneer :)
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/1/2015 5:14 AM, dadiOH wrote:

Same idea, but only 22 1/2 degrees instead of 90:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopACCornerCabinet2007?noredirect=1#5656820248765728530
I used biscuits with no problem over 70".
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's encouraging. Thanks! How wide is the wide piece?
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/1/2015 9:44 AM, dadiOH wrote:

You mean the angled face frame "stile" that joined at 22 1/2?
- door side is 2" wide; side is 6" wide.
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/1/15 5:14 AM, dadiOH wrote:

All the more reason to NOT use those bits. I was making a long joint and it was a major PITA squeezing that joint together the whole length. That locking miter joint would work for short lengths of stock or end grain joints, which would really benefit from that joint. There is absolutely no room for error with that joint and it's very difficult to get the glue to squeeze out, as well, meaning all the more difficult to get a tight fit.

Yes, and the coffee has kicked in. :-D

If I were doing it from scratch, I might go total old-school, low tech (are nail guns low tech?) and just edge glue the entire thing, and work my way along with a brad nailer to keep it lined up for clamping. If you don't want to see the nails, perhaps a pin nailer would work. You might get lucky and get a tight joint without clamping if you go easy on the glue.
If you were to go the spline rout, consider gluing the spline into one side, first, letting it dry, then gluing the other piece to it. I can see how the spline would eliminate the need for 90 degree clamping jigs. The nails/pins *should* accomplish the same thing.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yeah, that is what I would do, don't want nail holes - even teensy brad holes - in my mahogany :)
At the moment, I am leaning toward biscuits (good excuse to buy a plate joiner) and have pretty much trashed the miter lock bit idea. Thanks for your input.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/1/15 12:27 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Yeah, Karl's joint looked great! I would ask him how he clamped it. That's the real tricky part.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I was wondering that myself, but a few images before the linked one it shows it clamped. Scroll to the left...
I'm envious of Karl's ability and craftsmanship. Like all Master Craftsmen he makes it look easy even when we know that it is not.
Luke
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/1/15 1:10 PM, luke.t wrote:

Ahhh yes, the shop-made cleats. Hate that guy. :-D
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/1/2015 12:10 PM, luke.t wrote:

22 1/2° joints using biscuits.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/100373064@N03/16420890932/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/1/2015 2:56 PM, MaxD wrote:

Love the cloud motif. Well done!
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/1/2015 12:41 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

ASCII and you shall receive:
Made a jig and some angled clamping blocks, with scraps, of course:
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopACCornerCabinet2007?noredirect=1#5656820204145629682
Took about 30 minutes, but well worth the effort. I still have the angled blocks and have used them a few times since.
Now, go watch the damn football game...
--
eWoodShop: www.eWoodShop.com
Wood Shop: www.e-WoodShop.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/1/2015 12:41 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

back side.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/2/15 10:02 PM, Leon wrote:

That's what I did last time.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You are using a plywood base, might pockets hole be an answer? Would also make for dry fitting your side pieces marking the corner joints and fitting them possible. You can also remove them after the glue dries. ;)
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, January 31, 2015 at 10:40:53 AM UTC-8, dadiOH wrote:

Sounds much too fiddly. Why not assemble the frame and plywood, bevel the edges of both it and the glued-together apron, and glue the whole circumference in one gluing operation. Cut the top frame oversize by a few millimeters. Lay the top on a flat surface, upside down, apply glue. Just drop the frame onto it. No clamping, just gravity. After the glue is dry, clean up any and all top overhang with a router and pattern bit, or plane.
I'd leave the tile attachment to the last, maybe after finishing the wood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.