Miter Gauge Angle Error.


I wrote a blog post on miter gauge angle error. I'd appreciate any feedback or your take on it.
http://www.garagewoodworks.com/garage_blog /
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On 8/20/2010 10:48 PM, GarageWoodworks wrote:

With my 50 year old 10" Craftsman table saw, squaring the miter gauge is as simple as flipping it upside down, putting it in the groove, and running it up against the back of the table.
For angles I use one of those metal 45 metal triangle. I place the miter gauge in the groove and place the triangle against the miter gauge and "square" using the saw blade at full height.
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On Fri, 20 Aug 2010 19:48:25 -0700 (PDT), GarageWoodworks

My take is that you can check with a good square and maybe not be as close as you can get.
If you have a properly milled board, or a stick of MDF, or whatever, flat and square, try this: Crosscut it in half, then flip the offcut over. Butt up the 2 pieces at the cut, with the board edge against a straight edge (such as sitting on the table saw itself).
If there is an anglular error, this will double it and make it that much easier to see.
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"Jim Weisgram" wrote:

Yep.
Neat, clean, simple, low cost AND accurate.
Lew
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Works great. Really, a nit to pick; it need not be square. The two things it must have is a really straight edge (that will be against the miter gauge, or fence on chop saw or radial arm) and the opposite side from the straight edge must be perfectly parallel.
--
Jim in NC



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On 8/21/2010 9:44 PM, Morgans wrote:

Even easier, no straight edge required: Rip a piece of stable 1/2" (preferably thicker) scrap about 3" in width (or wider), 24" in length (or longer), then cross-cut it in half with whatever jig or sled you're trying to calibrate. Flip the off-cut over, pivot the right and left ends towards each other so they come together away from you, and with the cross-cut ends towards you. Stand the two pieces up on the surface of the table saw top (bringing the far ends up and towards you), then with the freshly cross-cut ends dead-flat on the table, slide them together so the two long (ripped) edges touch. If there is a gap at the top or bottom and they don't mate together perfectly, then you have an angle error in your cross-cut jig.
--
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Right, except if there is no straight edge to register on the miter gauge, how do you get it to represent what the angle is, and how do you get it to compare to each other if it doesn't have a straight edge to compare?
Either that, or I lost you in all of the ripping and flipping and stuff.
I'll continue to get two straight and parallel sides when I adjust my saw or sled, thanks. <g>
--
Jim in NC



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On 8/24/2010 7:49 PM, Morgans wrote:

Sorry; when I said "no straight edge required", I was referring to Jim's version of a "straight edge" (a tool) not a piece of scrap with a "straight edge". Implied in my instructions to "rip a piece of stable scrap" was the assumption that you're working on a well-calibrated saw, where the blade is exactly parallel to the miter slot, and the rip fence is likewise parallel and true, thus (by default) yielding a workpiece with a straight edge.
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wrote:

I use a 12" 45-90-45 plastic draftsman's triangle. Gets my miter gauge as close to square as I'll ever need it, in less than 1 minute.
Add a 30-60-90 triangle, and you can quickly set up to any angle multiple of 15 degrees.
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Father Haskell wrote:

With first semester calculus, you could quantify the differential of the adjacent side with respect to differential of the angle. If you seek it's maximum, say over a small interval containing the desired measure of your angle, then you will know how many significant digits that you'll need in order to satisfy your requirements. This way you can work to the precision and thus the accuracy that you require, not more and not less.
Bill

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