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wrote:

instructor some 30 tears ago. Glass is technically a liquid vs. a solid, it heals itself. I have never verified the next example of glass being in a liquid type state but it is said that the stained glass in old church windows is thicker at the bottom and thinner at the top.

75yrs old and older will be visibly thicker on the bottom, with waves/wrinkles (flows unevenly) that will noticeably deflect light. That's an old wives' tale. Glass is a solid at normal room temperatures and does not *run*. The "thickening" at the "bottom" that had been noticed was an artifact of how the glass was made a century, and more, ago.

it, only noticeable with clear glass, i.e., an aspect to help in dating/aging glass, bottles, jars, etc.

pausing before snapping, to inspect that the score mark was visible and, if not, score it again. <---> What was that thread, "Pretend you know an idiot"? Ibid.

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Leon wrote:

And ultimately it will crystallize. Takes some millions of years, though. That's why there is no natural glass (obsidian) beyond a certain age.
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On 5/2/13 7:28 AM, Leon wrote:

After I wrote that I googled a bit. I'm pretty sure that whole "glass is liquid" thing is an old wives' tale. But there are still plenty of glass sites recycling that information. Sounds a lot like woodworks, huh? :-)
There's a camp that touts glass as be a "super-cooled" liquid that can still move like a liquid, over time. That whole thing came about because of old windows being "thicker on the bottom." People though that gravity affected the "super cooled liquid" causing the glass to fall to the bottom over time. That's all horse crap.
The reason really old windows were thicker in places (not always at "the bottom") was because the way they made the glass and how it was formed when being fired. They just didn't have the modern technology to flatten it out, uniformly, like they can today.
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Leon wrote:

If true, that is probably due to matters of weight. So that it is able to support it's own mass without cracking. Bill
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On 5/1/2013 1:24 PM, chaniarts wrote:

while. apparently not.

No, I did not have the problem.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Go to a glass shop. Tell them the size. They will cut it. They will smooth the edges.
Last I bought were about 30" x 80". They cost $75 each including transporting to our house and installing on the wall. That was about 10-12 years ago.
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On Monday, April 29, 2013 7:14:36 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

daughter was sick this weekend and had to take her to the doctor. On top of that i had to buy a new router and figure out how to hook it up to my old table.

are debating is whether to paint or stain it. I want to stain it to match the cabinet which is also in the attached picture. But I am open to anything.

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On Wednesday, May 1, 2013 7:05:42 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

it look too plain? Also, the other thing my wife and I are debating is whet her to paint or stain it.
Make the/some different profiles on some scrap and compare, for yourselves, which one you prefer.
Though I suppose you mean the outside edges, the inside edges on one of my (store bought) mirrors has a square cut 1/4" edge/reveal (against the glass ) and it's harder to easily clean those edges, especially the bottom edge, against the glass, as compared to my other mirrors that have a gentle profi le, of some sort, right up to the glass, and those edges are easier to clea n.
If that's your first attempt at framing, you did a darn good job. The more you do, the better you'll get. Your question already implies you're think ing of improving on this job, soooo, where else might a mirror or framed pi ece be needed in your home?
Sonny
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On Monday, April 29, 2013 7:14:36 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

daughter was sick this weekend and had to take her to the doctor. On top of that i had to buy a new router and figure out how to hook it up to my old table.

are debating is whether to paint or stain it. I want to stain it to match the cabinet which is also in the attached picture. But I am open to anything.

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On Wednesday, May 1, 2013 1:10:49 PM UTC-5, stry wrote:

The lower cabinets don't seem to be stained. They appear clear coated.
Apply a clear coat to some scrap and compare the two. If the cabinets are a touch darker, put some toner in your finish, to darken it a tad, and apply toned coats (to the test scrap, first) creeping up on a best matching tone/color.
Sonny
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On Wednesday, May 1, 2013 4:07:08 PM UTC-5, Sonny wrote:

typically do a good job or should I just buy several close stains and try to mix and match myself?

touch darker, put some toner in your finish, to darken it a tad, and apply toned coats (to the test scrap, first) creeping up on a best matching tone/color.

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On Thursday, May 2, 2013 7:26:18 AM UTC-5, stry wrote:

y to mix and match myself?
Before visiting SW, get a scrap piece of wood and wet it with mineral spiri ts. Does the darkened wet-look color/shade match the color/shade of your c abinets?
Sherwin Williams might match stains, but do they match tones? You may be c onfusing the terms. Toning is the mixing of a color agent (usually a darke ning agent, or to enhance a color/shade), into a clear coat finish, to give the finished piece/furniture a darkened/enhanced coating/appearance, i.e., darker than its natural color.
If a stain is applied and it's not dark enough, then often a toned top coat is applied to bring the piece to the best matching color/shade, rather tha n applying more stain. Applying more stain is harder to control, to achiev e the right color/shade, than applying a/some toned coating/s.
They would need to see your cabinets or a sample (a door!). They would pro bably verify if the cabinets have been stained or toned or neither (simply clear coated). They look clear coated, not stained, at all. The present f inish might have a tone to it. If there is any different coloration, to th em, beyond the wood's natural color, then the present finish was likely ton ed, before it was applied, i.e., they would have a different color/shade be cause of toning, not staining.
Rather than recommend applying a stain, I would suspect Sherwin Williams wo uld recommend toning the finish you are to apply, to match the color/shade of the cabinets. They would, in turn, need to do some test pieces and/or t est applications, to determine the correct recipe/schedule, to match or clo sely match the shade of/on the cabinets.
If toning is to be done, you won't need very much toning agent, for the ble nd/mix. SW may not charge you for the amount of toning agent used, but the y may charge you for the testing. It may take some time for them to do th e testing and there may be a fee for this time.
I've never had any paint store blend a tone for me. I do my own toning, of clear coat applications. The only thing I've had a paint store do is matc h a paint color/shade, not a tone shade.
Sonny
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On Monday, April 29, 2013 7:14:36 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

p of that i had to buy a new router and figure out how to hook it up to my old table.

rror could be replaced, however with it not being square, I am not sure if this isstill a good idea as at least with the full channel in there I can " adjust" the position of the pieces before gluing them up if that makes sens e.
Also, If I round over the edge can this be done on the individual pieces be fore gluing the frame togther or is it best to assemble the frame then rout e the pieces? (My only router is mounted to the table. I can take it out I guess if I need to but it took me awhile to mount it).
Sorry for the dumb questions.

h the cabinet which is also in the attached picture. But I am open to anyth ing.

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Yes, you can put a profile on the outside edges before you assemble them. However, IMO, it is better to do them after assembly so that any length or thickness mismatches in the pieces can be corrected first.
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On Monday, April 29, 2013 7:14:36 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

daughter was sick this weekend and had to take her to the doctor. On top of that i had to buy a new router and figure out how to hook it up to my old table.

stile bits I wonder if i can still assemple using pocket holes so the unit can be assembled and disassembled.

are debating is whether to paint or stain it. I want to stain it to match the cabinet which is also in the attached picture. But I am open to anything.

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