Minwax vs. Johnson for your iron

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Having purchased my first iron machine (a General 650) just a few months ago, and living is South Florida, where looking at metal causes it to rust, I turned to the net for advice on protection.
There have been many threads (including a recent one) that suggest wax treatments for tables saws (and other iron). Brands of paste wax most often mentioned are Johnson's, Minwax, and Butchers. My local BORG only had Minwax, so that's what I got, and its done a pretty good job of keeping the table clear of rust.
Apparently, these wax treatments are also supposed to make the table slick, so that wood kind of floats as you feed it into the blade. This, I did not find to be true. In fact, even though I had buffed and buffed, the Minwax left a finish that if anything *resisted* wood being passed over it. I was perplexed until someone in that recent WRECK thread suggested that the Minwax people say their product contains a "non-slip" additive. Ah ha!
So, I went on a scouring search for Johnson's. This stuff is not easy to find, but finally today I was in a no-name hardware shop that happened to have two tins. I brought one home.
Not only is the Johnson's easier to apply (it is softer, and also seems to glaze over faster and more consistently), but what a difference it makes to the feed factor! I mean, its like I have to hold the wood back. I now use a push stick on the other side of the table to counteract the inertia of the initial movement toward the blade. Ripping 8ft maple boards feels like being in a some kind of lost Stanley Kubrick movie about woodworking in 3001.
In short, Johnson's 1, Minwax 0.
/rick
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RickS writes:

Why is Johnson's hard to find in some areas? Check grocery stores, floor care products, and you almost always find it fast.
Yes, Johnson's is better for tabletop use. Minwax is designed to reduce slipping on floors and other surfaces, so is less than ideal for surfaces, such as your table saw top, where you want wood to glide easily. Quite probably it's a simple difference, more beeswax in the Minwax and more paraffin wax in the Johnson's, with about the same amount of carnauba to harden the final result.
Charlie Self "Inanimate objects are classified scientifically into three major categories - those that don't work, those that break down and those that get lost." Russell Baker
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HD & Lowes doesn't and visiting relatives 250 miles away the local Ace had Johnsons and Trewax on same shelf. NOW new Do It Right has Johnsons but boxes don't. Same with Zinssers Seal Coat, boxes don't carry but Do It Right does.
On 13 Aug 2004 08:32:10 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

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Make that Do It Best.
On Fri, 13 Aug 2004 08:28:19 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net"

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I think it depends where you are.
When I lived up North, I remember seeing Johnson's in grocery stores. It was something I noticed because my mother used it years ago, and the tin is distinctive.
Here, down South, the grocery stores don't seem to have it -- I checked 4 or 5 (from different chains). The BORGS don't have it, and one or two hardware stores I checked don't have it. I was about to try and order it off the web, when I happened by a small hardware shop and thought "what the heck", and went in to find it stocked.
/rick (from Plantation, FL).
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Minwax and most other "floor" waxes are required to add anti-slip additives in order to meet OSHA requirements for commercial usage. Johnson's was grandfathered out of the regs and can still call their product a floor wax without the additives. I do not believe that I have seen any other wax that states it is a floor wax that doesn't have the additive. The bowling alley wax (Butchers?) may be an exception if it specifies use on the alley and not on floors you are supposed to walk on. However, any intelligent commercial user will steer very clear from Johnsons for (non-bowling alley) floor use unless they like paying legal bills and settlements. The school district I work for has numerous wood floored gyms and other wood floors. We specifically require the OSHA regs be met by any floor wax purchased. I have my can of Johnsons at home though :)
Dave Hall
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snipped-for-privacy@cs.com says...

certainly doesn't seem to have those additives. I don't have the can handy. but my tablesaw top gets quite slippery when waxed with it.
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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Can't say I have ever seen a can of Trewax. Does it state on the can that it is a floor wax like Johnsons and Minwax do?
Dave Hall
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<<Can't say I have ever seen a can of Trewax. Does it state on the can that it is a floor wax like Johnsons and Minwax do?>>
A floor wax AND a dessert topping. <g>
Lee
--
To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"



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Several suggest either for same use so equivalent for them. Johnsons or Trewax.
On 15 Aug 2004 00:36:28 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cs.com (David Hall) wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@cs.com says...

--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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says, in fine print on the back, that it has anti-slip additives. So in fact I was wrong.
In the real world, however, I just waxed my workbench in preparation for a glue-up, and if that's non-slip I'd hate to use the slick stuff :-).
So I'll continue to use the Trewax as long as I can find it. The partial can I've got is probably good for another year. It just seems to work so well for me - they claim a high carnuba content and maybe that's the difference.
Our high humidity is in the winter. When it gets really cold (high for the day below freezing) I don't work in the shop. So I seldom wax in the winter. And I've never had any rust on any of the cast iron tables.
OK, there was the time I left a load of green lumber sit on the tablesaw over the weekend :-).
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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The wheel reinvented.
Floor wax is indeed different from furniture wax.
Maintenance supply places are where I get what I want. Fingers walk.
"RickS" <rick --dot-- s --at-- comcast.net> wrote in message

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"RickS" <rick --dot-- s --at-- comcast.net> wrote in message

Rick,
Thanks for posting this. I have had the same experience with Minwax and I just figured it was my fault somehow. Looks like I need to locate some Johnson's wax!
Frank
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I found some a while back at one of the BORGs (I don't remember which one). It wasn't on the shelf - I actually had to ask somebody to look in the back to see if they had any.
Casey _____________________________________ delete the nospam to email me
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Lowes has it.
David
Frank Ketchum wrote:

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On Fri, 13 Aug 2004 08:56:01 -0400, Frank Ketchum wrote:

Chad
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Having lived near the ocean in new england and having several cast machines i found that a "Hot Wax" treatment was best.
Clean the table up real good and dress it out with fine wet/dry using kerosene or such solvent to lift out any rust etc.
Clean surface well with denatured alchohol.
Put the solvents away and dispose of any rags etc,,,
Heat the table up with a torch or heat gun and melt the wax onto the surface, then use a sharp scraper to remove the excess. IIRC i used beeswax.
Vin
"RickS" <rick --dot-- s --at-- comcast.net> wrote in message

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I use SCJohnson's Wax on the cast surfaces of my shop equipment too. BUT, I enhance the slipperiness further by spraying a light coat of Ez-Glide, available at the Borg. It's a non-silicone dry lubricant and makes for an awesomely slippery surface. It doesn't contaminate the wood. I buff it off a few seconds after application. It evaporates in a couple of seconds.
David
RickS wrote:

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"RickS" <rick --dot-- s --at-- comcast.net> wrote in message

You can always get it directly from the source:
http://www.scjbrands.com/mailorder /
Michael Latcha - at home in Redford, MI
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