Minwax fast drying poly over Formby's Tung Oil

Getting ready to finish a desk, the top is walnut with walnut inlay and I would like a good durable finish. Have been experimenting with just the Formby's Tung Oil and just simply Poly, question is... would I get the best finish by using 2-3 applicaitons of Formby's Tung Oil, then 2 or 3 Minwax Fast-Drying Polyurethane? One of those things, your scared to start but want it done right. There's no turning back! The desk is built in, which is built of red oak, with the desk top walnut and crown trim has a section of walnut, all else is oak - the backs of the uppers is beadboard .. which I would like to apply the Formby's tung oil to all, should this be covered with Poly as well, or is Formby's good enough, or is the Minwax fast drying great by itself?
Any suggestions would be great! I've narrowed it down to these choices, but open to suggestions... Thanks, dcrab
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is no harm to putting on two brands of poly, but no particular point to it either. Personally I would put LBO over all, let dry thoroughly, and put poly over the desktop.
Note they call it "Tung Oil Finish". That is much like "Orange Drink" that has no orange in it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I just did a jewelry box that had a couple coats of Danish Oil and then two coats of Minwax Fast Drying Poly and it turned out great, or so everyone tells me. :)
I personally didn't really see much of a difference after I put the second coat of danish oil on.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

doesn't make much sense to put a hard film over a soft film.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Since when is oil a "film" finish?
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

When the surface is saturated and you add another coat. It's called "curing" oil for a reason.
OTOH, most "Danish" oils aren't rich enough to saturate the surface after only two coats, so the poly will likely be fine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

to see how they could avoid saturating the surface.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

a harder surface than cured oil.
Look at your walls, painted with oil-based paints and if they're old enough, you can probably count the layers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
thanks for the insite and Danish Oil updates - Which BTW i'm not going to use... I want a Varnish which is a better application for my project.
Formby's Tung Oil is mostly Varnish and carrys little Oil. Wipe on Ply is mostly Varnish as well. It helps to do your homework before jumping into a big project as this. Not all Tung Oil's are the same!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is really nothing wrong with putting a varnish over a Danish Oil. The oil is not much protection and should be covered if you want added protection.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

film over a soft film? It just encourages the hard film to be scratched? Oil is not much protection and should be covered, true; but Danish Oil is not oil.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not the Danish Oils that I have used in the past. Typically they would dry out/soak in and never form a rich or protective finish. I always was advised by the manufacturer to applied a protective varnish for protection. Some 30 years later none of the pieces that I have and that were varnished after the Danish Oil coats have shown any sign of problems or scratches.
That said, I eventually realized that there was no real advantage to applying the Danish Oil and then covering with a varnish. The pieces look just as good with a varnish vs. both products IMHO.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@nc.rr.com wrote:

What would be the point of using both?
There are three things a finish does...
1. Color the wood 2. Protect the wood 3. Provide a sheen
All finishes color the wood to some extent. By "color" I mean that both the grain and natutal color is emphasized. Water base finishes color the least; oil based - varnish or oil - color the most. Lacquer is intermediate. Don't recall about shellac, been too long since I used it.
Surface films like varnish and lacquer provide the most protection, oils the least. By "protection" I mean protection from stains, spills, fingermarks and the like, not protection from physical damage.
The sheen can range from dead flat to high gloss. Oils provide a flat sheen but can be worked up with was to a pleasant glow. Surface films like varnish/lacqur/shellac can be whatever you want.
Consequently, my question of "What would be the point of using both?". You would gain nothing using oil then poly vs poly alone (assuming it is oil based poly).
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.