minor cuts treatment

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Hi All.
How do you guys treat minor cuts and scratches? I mean on your hands. I know that I am not suppose to cut myself, but just today while planing board of ash I created such a sharp edge on a board itself. My hand slipped and again I have a scratch. What I am looking for is some kind of cream or gel which would accelerate healing process. Any suggestions?
Thanks, Dmitri
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Liquid bandaid. Paint it on, forms covering. Great for minor scratches and burns.

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Dmitri wrote:

If it's minor, I usually don't bother to treat it at all.
For more serious cuts, any readily available antibacterial/antifungal ointment, such as Neo-Sporin or one of its many clones should do the trick.
The stuff really does accelerate healing. I remember a situation where I had a serious cut on one finger, which I doctored diligently, and some kind of nuissance paper cut on another. The deep but doctored cut healed much faster than untreated the paper cut.
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Dmitri wrote:

There is no magic potion. To my knowledge, the only thing that has been found to actually speed healing is petroleum jelly (vaseline).
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I think it depends on what kind of cut. A cut like a paper cut or similar, you can use superglue to bond it back in place. Other cuts, I've cleaned them and then dabbed on a little bit of that stuff one uses for gum or toothache pain. Deeper cuts? Well, it depends on how far the blood is gushing.

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I just sprinkle a little sawdust on mine.
I dries it up real fast, and just a few minutes can be brushed off.

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Not worried about infection? Wood or the dirt embedded in it could cause problems.

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The sawdust itself is probably pretty sterile having been inside of a tree for many many years. The question would seem to be with what might it be contaminated? Ordinary housedust is typically loaded with tetnus spores.
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You know, once upon a time folks used to pack small wounds full of ash from their wood stoves. I'm not sure what the reason for it was...to promote healing or stop bleeding...but is was common practice. It didn't seem to have any ill effects, other than leaving strange looking spots on your body. I know of several older folks who have dark or black spots on their arms and legs from this practice....evidently the ash is still there.
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The sawdust trick isn't bad. I've found it is better to mix sawdust and glue into a slurry. Apply with a putty knife and scrape off excess. For air sucking wounds clamp a chunk of scrap into the wound (glue generously) and apply clamps. After 24 hours, unclamp, plane and sand smooth up to 220 grit. The wood can be stained to match skin tone if need be.
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I just use neosporin and bandaids.
Rule of thumb though, if you have to squeeze the whole tube of neosporin into the wound to cover it, its probably a a wound that is unsuitable for topical u n g u e n t s or o i n t m e n t s...
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"David Binkowski" wrote in message

LOL ... That's where your first post comes in, right?
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Info I got from a doctor that specializes in wilderness first aid: Don't use neosporin or any other antibiotic as a prophylactic. Just put on the bandage and let the wound heal. If the wound starts to show signs of infection, then use antibiotic.
A fresh cut that's bled will not likely be infected. If it is, there are lots of different bacteria that are competing. They will kill each other off. Anything left will have to deal with your immune system and your body's immune system will have had time to adapt and move in. Using an antibiotic of any kind up front only creates a resistant bacteria that will require stronger antibiotic later on.
Mike
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Superglues were originally developed as an alternative to stiches following surgery. However the use has been discontinued due to carcinogeneity. I don't know whether or not the malignancies were confined to the site where the material was used.
Try a band aid.
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Fred the Red Shirt wrote:

Not true... I have patients with Dermabonded wounds quite often. We have a neurosurgeon who regularly uses Dermabond on his laminectomies and lumbar fusions. Creates a beautiful wound... no bruising; no oozing.
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Where beauty is truly in the eye of the beholder.
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[snip]

A number of solvents have been deemed carcinogenic (some superglues may contain the dreaded methylene chloride). Believe leukemias would be the specific result. HOWEVER, this is usually the result of a lifetime of exposure to large quantities. I wouldn't let it stop me from using a dab here or there.

That is what I do. Mostly because everytime I open a tube, it seems to dry up and become unusable. Bandaids are much cheaper.

Montyhp
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"Montyhp" <montyhp at yahoo.com> wrote in message

SOMETHING stopped surgeons from usning superglues in lieu of stiches.
I guess I should google for that info and get back to you.
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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net (Fred the Red Shirt) wrote in message

Nope, I was wrong. My source for this information was:
http://groups.google.com/groups?selm?1181B7.70106%40heronsnest.com&oe=UTF-8&output=gplain
and I don't think any of us will be trying to mend broken bones in our workshops. A little bit of searching shows that CA glue for wound closure is an accepted practice, perhaps even on the rise.
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similar,
There is a product currently in use called DermaBond that is, essentially, super glue for closing wounds. It is not a carcinogen and it makes for much less noticeable scars if it's applied correctly.
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