Minimum recommended setup?

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Crosscutting, especially with veneered plywood is where your 80T carbide tipped blade would typically find its home.
However, a 60t carbide tipped combination blade can handle the ripping and crosscutting of that veneered plywood with satisfactory results. ~ Saves a little money and the need to change blades.
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expensive, but as plywood sizes vary so much you might find it will save you a lot of time and trouble with setup. I know budgets have to be maintained, but this will pay for it's self with reduced frustration and tighter fits.
Mike M
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Mike M wrote:

I didn't really want to like it... But as a $75 premium on an already $200 dado blade set, I can see that it would quickly pay for itself in "reduced frustration" (as you called it). Thank you for mentioning the blade.
Bill
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Ask Swingman he uses the same blade.
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"Bill" wrote:

Having had a Freud SD508, it didn't disappoint me.
You have a couple of chippers designed to match the undersized ply in the set.
A $20 dial caliper OTOH, is worth it's weight in gold IMHO during setup.
OTOH, until you have a table saw, the SD508 is nothing more than a display trinket.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

When I tell folks that I read through motherboard manuals before buying the motherboard they will often look at me as though that is absurd. IMO, there is no other (good) way to do it. I was surprised to learn that the Dial-A-Width Freud Dado set does not work on all saws, including some you might expect it to work on. And yes, I learned this yesterday with neither a table saw nor a dado set. Knowledge is king (or queen). Of course, telling you this is like preaching to the pope... ; )
Cheers, Bill
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First off figure out what you want to build. Exactly. Then maybe come here and ask what tools you need and how to use them to build whatever you want to build. The people here will suggest many different tools and many different ways to build whatever you want to build. Then figure out what method you want to use to build the project. Then go buy those tools. Repeat for the second, third, fourth project. Eventually you will have quite a few tools. And many of the tools will get used over and over on every project. I don't recommend going out and buying lots of tools to start. Not even the basics such as a table saw and router. Wait until you know you are going to use them. Best to get the tools as you need them for a specific project. You can make the decision whether to go high end tools or low end tools. Probably replace a few tools with better after awhile. Nothing wrong with that. Its not wasted money since you used the cheaper tools for awhile and learned something.
On Saturday, December 15, 2012 5:20:52 PM UTC-6, Pringles CheezUms wrote:

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On 12/16/2012 3:49 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

That's great advice (even if I didn't always follow it myself). There's a saying, "if all you have is a hammer, every problem is a nail!" Apt for this discussion. Collect/buy the tools you need for the job at hand and the method you'll employ AFTER noodling the "problem" for awhile.
Faced with undercutting all the door jambs in the house to replace carpeting with flooring I "noodled" the best and easiest way to make accurate undercuts that wouldn't have me standing on my head in a closet doorway while I made them. Could have gone out and bought a machine made exclusively for that but...
I then remembered that I had a biscuit cutter. Using the biscuit cutter's height adjustment and a plywood shim in one case allowed me to undercut every jamb in the house, perfectly square in the time it would have taken Norm Abrams to cut one with a hand saw<g>

This is referred to as "Tool Acquisition 101" Accustom SWMBO to the concept of "One Project, (at least) One New Tool." When you couple that with "If Mamma is Happy, EVERYBODY's happy" and do nice work on the projects that she requests, she's not going to complain about your tool purchases. If you luck out you may find, as I did, that SWMBO is your "bird dog." First married and still living in an apartment but planning a house, my wife spotted my first power tool purchase, a used RAS with a ton of accessories that has served me well for almost 40 years now. She is also the one who spotted a used Jet cabinet saw advertised in the local fishwrap and chased me over to buy it since she knew I wanted one (note that the word NEED is not necessarily part of the purchase strategem<g>). So it goes with sales on quality tools seen in newspaper fliers, etc. No, she doesn't use them, can't use most of them. She's quite happy to assist when necessary and hold the dumb end of the tape measure.
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Hoo boy this is much bigger than I expected! Cool. This get-what-you-need-per-project seems to be good advice. I'll start there.
I've already got a good drill, and what I think is a set of good bits so that's taken care of. Dewalt 24 volt (i think), two batteries. I use the charger that came with it but don't know how good a quality it is. Better be tho, retails for round a couple hundred bucks. (not that I paid that much, I'm pretty cheap...err, frugal. yeah, frugal. thatstheticket.)
I've used a handheld circular saw most of my life, and I could go borrow one of dads. But I'm a lazy son of a gun as well, and a table saw seems it would do it faster and smoother once I got used to it. Doubt it would go to waste, there always seems to be a better way to make things take less space than they do, know what I mean? Used seems to be the way to go.
Thanks all!

and ask what tools you need and how to use them to build whatever you want to build. The people here will suggest many different tools and many different ways to build whatever you want to build. Then figure out what method you want to use to build the project. Then go buy those tools. Repeat for the second, third, fourth project. Eventually you will have quite a few tools. And many of the tools will get used over and over on every project. I don't recommend going out and buying lots of tools to start. Not even the basics such as a table saw and router. Wait until you know you are going to use them. Best to get the tools as you need them for a specific project. You can make the decision whether to go high end tools or low end tools. Probably replace a few tools with better after awhile. Nothing wrong with that. Its not wasted money since you used the cheaper tools for awhile and learned

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On Sun, 16 Dec 2012 19:02:50 -0600, Pringles CheezUms

[...snip...]
A good table saw is a great thing to have. But realize it is a slippery slope. You will find it great at ripping and OK at crosscutting, but eventually the limitations for crosscutting will become apparent. Then you will want a compound miter saw, sliding or not. Until you find you want to crosscut wider boards than it will do. Then you go back to the table saw and make a sled or two to help with that. Or you invest in a track saw.
By the way, if you take the time to learn how, you will find that a good quality properly sharpened handsaw will make much faster, cleaner and more accurate cuts than you ever would have suspected.
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Pringles CheezUms wrote:

Check your communty's Craigslist. Recently I bought a low-end table saw (virtually new) for $35 and gave it to my son. I also bought two disk and belt sanders, the first was a 6" ($30) and the second was and 8" ($35).
Of course you'll have to differentate between immediate or probable use (table saw) or something of inconceivable usage (sheet metal brake).
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On 12/16/12 7:26 AM, HeyBub wrote:

Yes, used is a great place to look, especially craigslist. My shop is a veritable showcase of craigslist scores that have saved me at least $1500 on my own "minimum recommended tools" acquisition, including a barely used $950 table saw I got for $225.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On Saturday, December 15, 2012 3:20:52 PM UTC-8, Pringles CheezUms wrote:

Find someplace to take a few classes. Then your list will build itself.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

around the house. I'd like to be able to make fairly simple things like shelves and bookcases, structure to organize closets, etc. What are some minimum recommended tools? Not the small things like measuring tape or glue or the like, but the big stuff. A basic table saw probably, right? I'd like to be able to make strong joints like dovetail (or whatever the straight version of that is) so maybe a router is necessary, yes? Would you recommend a nail gun? It comes in really handy doesn't it?

Or pick your project and buy what you need to build it. Then pick another project.
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Let me finish with
Are there sources for plans for common things on the net? I googled, but only found pay sites. Specifically, I'd like to build a modular bookcase. Cubes that stack and look decent but that I could just grab when I want to reorganize or move. (kinda like milk crates but stronger.) Any website, and/or plans, like that around?
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Pringles CheezUms wrote:

Maybe browse some woodworking magazines. I think Wood magazine has a bookcase related item in every issue-at least it seems like they do. Virtually every book on cabinetmaking in your library ought to have plenty of ideas. You may even find such a book on Google Books. You might look at Google Images website lumberjocks.com for ideas.
Try to draw a picture of what you want. Does your project need to resemble "fine woodworking" or will "rough carpentry" suffice? Are you really going to be satisfied with "stackable cubes"? If so, I guess you only figure out how to build one. What material do you wish to build with? The expression "look decent" is really vague--WHAT do you want it to look like?
If you can sketch, give it a go! You can post it at alt.binaries.picures.woodworking, and you will probably get some helpful tips from people who know stuff.
Cheers, Bill
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On 12/20/2012 2:53 AM, Bill wrote:

thousands of hits.
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On Thu, 20 Dec 2012 01:00:37 -0600, Pringles CheezUms

http://www.popularwoodworking.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10//Barrister3.pdf Much nicer looking than cubes or boards set on concrete blocks.
Google "free woodworking plans" for more options.
-- It is characteristic of all deep human problems that they are not to be approached without some humor and some bewilderment. -- Freeman Dyson
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On Thu, 20 Dec 2012 08:35:59 -0800, Larry Jaques

Or, you could try alt.binaries.e-book.technical for most everything you'd ever want.
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