Minimum recommended setup?

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I'e been thinking about getting woodworking tools so I can fill some needs around the house. I'd like to be able to make fairly simple things like shelves and bookcases, structure to organize closets, etc.
What are some minimum recommended tools? Not the small things like measuring tape or glue or the like, but the big stuff. A basic table saw probably, right? I'd like to be able to make strong joints like dovetail (or whatever the straight version of that is) so maybe a router is necessary, yes? Would you recommend a nail gun? It comes in really handy doesn't it?
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Pringles CheezUms wrote:

P-C, It depends on how lofty you set your goals. You can rough-cut plenty of wood with a $15 hand saw (and clean it up very nicely, if desired, with an inexpensive block plane). Bang-for-your-buck wise, you might pick up a decent cordless drill/driver if you don't have one. I pick up nails and screws on an as-needed basis. In fact, buying tools on an as-needed basis is probably a prudent way to proceed. If you don't have a place to work with reasonable lighting, and 15 Amps of current that is convenient, you might look into that.
If you are "organizing closets" then you probably don't require a table saw unless you want to have one.
I'm a beginner, and I can assure you that there are people here who can help answer most any questions that you may have.
Enjoy.. Bill

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On Sat, 15 Dec 2012 21:48:18 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

Yup. I think Bill needs to attend the etiquette class on how to get permission to buy tools ~ especially at this time of year.
And just a follow up for you Bill. Unless you get to specify the exact model numbers of the tools a wife can pick from, tell her you'd really, really like it if she took you along with her while shopping.
Unfortunately but true, is the fact that wives and girlfriends while their hearts are usually in the right place, often buy the most terrible tools or at the very least, spend way too much on a tool that they could have bought elsewhere much cheaper. Tool sales people are merciless when it comes to selling tools to women.
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And lingerie to husbands and boyfriends.
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wrote:

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Mike Marlow wrote:

Exactly ! In converting a propane grill to use natural gas, the instructions called for drilling out an intake valve with a #51 bit. Well, I tell you, that was exactly the reason I sprang for a 115 piece drill bit set. Couldn't have justified the expese otherwise.
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Yeah, absolutely right. At lease he left an out for the poor guy by saying "probably..."
--
Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
  Click to see the full signature.
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wrote:

I used to have all my woodworking tools stored in my garage. All of them had a specific place when not in use, so I could still get the cars in the garage. Theree years ago, I wanted to buy a new tablesaw and I had the spot picked out to store it. After I got it home and started to assemble it, I forgot to account for the side wings. It was at this point that I talked the wife into letting me build a 20x22 workshop, instead of returning the tablesaw. I think I did pretty good in that deal.
Rob
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wrote:

That new TS cost me about $15K. Concrete slab, fully insulated with air/heat/satellite radio and HD TV.
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On 12/19/2012 12:23 PM, rlz wrote:

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wrote:

Actually she was fairly easy to win over. I told her that I would move all my tools into the workshop and she would finally get a cleaned out garage. Of course, the garage was un-finished, so after I built the workshop, I had to insulate and drywall the garage for her. It does look nice in there now, and I spend every available minute in my shop.
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On Wed, 19 Dec 2012 14:43:56 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

Yeah Rob, that would have been my question too. What if anything did you build for your wife to get her permission? That's the standard woodworker's method of getting new tools ~ telling them you need it to build them something.
Of course, you could have agreed to something else, but that wouldn't be the tried and true 'new tool' method to get something new for the workshop.
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You need a good cordless drill/driver set. Don't bother with the $20 specials, spend some real dough. Get one with a smart charger (shuts off automatically when done), multiple batteries, and both drill and impact driver.
Add to that a good circular saw (you can go portable, but a corded model is better for medium-light to heavy use), and you're well on the way to being able to do most house-hold tasks.
We've got book cases that have stood for years that are nothing more than 1x12s (Menards Select grade) that have been screwed together. They're in great condition still (except one is leaning--but a backer board would fix that).
If you're in a tool buying mood, a multitool like the Fein Multimaster would be a good purchase. Harbor Freight has a very servicable tool for around $20, or you can spend some more and get one that isn't as loud and doesn't vibrate the tool body as much.
You might look in to pocket hole joinery. It's strong and easy to do, but perfection does take some experience... and maybe a few more clamps. Kreg (one company that makes pocket hold jigs) is pretty proud of their stuff, but it does work.
What you really need is a project. They have a wonderful way of spurring tool purchases and showing where your current tools are inadequate or not designed for what you need to do.
Don't forget clamps. Buy them in multiples of 4. Build a storage rack for them and buy some more.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On Sat, 15 Dec 2012 17:20:52 -0600, Pringles CheezUms

Depends on how serious you are, how much room you have, how much money you have.
My first tablesaw was a cheap Craftsman with the flimsy legs and aluminum top. It was OK for about a year and I built some nifty small stuff with it. Once I decided that, yes, I do like this hobby and will stick with it, I bought a Delta contractor type saw. Wow, amazing difference and much more capable for things like wide cross cuts, ease of setting the fence, etc. If you can do it, it is a great model. Sure, a 5 HP saw would be nice, but this certainly keeps up for me.
My preference for a router is one mounted in a table. I use that 99% of the time and hardly ever touch my hand held. The ability to do round-overs and grooves makes it a valuable tool.
Next for me is a sander. I have the Ryobi from Home Dept that uses a belt or spindle. Good value and performs well. Drill press and a small compressor rounds out most of the starter stuff. I do not have a nail gun, but I do have a stapler and brad gun. Buy them as you need them.
Don't forget clamps. Get at least two 18" and two 24" for starters.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Get the metal bar clamps at Harbor Freight. They are a good value, and that way you'll money for all of the stuff on Lew's list.
You could have great closets (I hope they are lit)! : )
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"Pringles CheezUms" wrote:

During the first year, expect to invest $2,000-$2,500 in equipment.
A good table saw with the best fence available for it.
A set of quality 10" carbide saw blades (24T, 50T & 80T).
A quality 8" carbide dado set.
A bench top planer.
A basic router package with router bits added as needed for a project.
A 6" ROS sander.
Clamps, clamps & more clamps.
That pretty well shoots $2,500 and does not address a jointer, dust collection, band saw, and hand drills.
It is also not all bought the first day.
You will be surprised how quick it adds up, but that's life for a wood worker.
Have fun.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Lew, just curious--Is the 80T blade for trim?
I was expecting the Forrest WWII (40T) or the Freud "Premier Fusion" (40T) blades would be good for sawing through my cherry veneered (poplar) plywood, and for general FWW use. The latter is about $80 and the former $40 more.
Any benefit to going with a higher tooth count here?
Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

I think of an 80T blade as the "plywood blade" rather than a solid wood cross cut blade.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

That makes sense. Thanks.
I had done a little searching before I posted and I had noticed that the 80t blades were described as appropriate for veneered plywood, then I considered that other blade everyone talks about that can "do everything" (It's name rhymes with "poorest"). I think I have more of a Freud budget at this point. I already added the Dewalt Stacked Dado set to my "wish list" today.
Cheers, Bill

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"Bill" wrote:

Freud periodically has a package deal with a 24T, 50T and an 80T set of blades for a package price.
Do yourself a favor and stick with Freud.
Their 8" stacked dado is a winner.
Lew
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