Minimizing noise from a compressor

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Because the consumption air is not enough to prevent overheating. Besides, air is heated when compressed.
Everything has to be put into proper perspective. Every compressor has a duty cycle. It may be 30%, but could be 100%. Industrial compressors sometimes go 24/7 for a year at a time. The 150 HP IR that we run will have air temperatures in the range of 240 degrees and the cooling water can reach 115 on a very hot day even with two fans running on the cooling tower.
Our 75 HP Quincy screw has a factory enclosure to keep noise down. There is also a large fan and vent to the outside about 2' square for the exhaust.
In the case of Upscale, he is looking at running about 10 minutes a few times a week. It will not even be up to normal operating temperature in that time so an enclosure is not a problem with cooling air.
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wrote:

rhetorical questions are wasted around here, I guess.

granted at the level he uses it now he could encase it in a block of concrete.
but he did say that part of the reason for doing this is so he can use it more.
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This was about compressors. Rhetoricals was another thread.
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As acoustics are often part of electrical engineering, (it spills over into architecture) the core of the discipline are simple, basic physics.
Once a noise is air-bound, only two things will kill it: mass and dissipation. In both cases, the energy is converted into heat (as infinitesimally small that heat may be)
Transmitted (through a body other than air) noise obeys those same rules. Parking your compressor on a heavy slab (like a patio stone they're cheap enough) will have an immediate, positive result. If you then also isolate the patio stone from the floor via a dissipating medium, like four tennis balls, not a whole lot will get to the floor. You will feel the immediate difference in your feet standing beside the running compressor. Cut 4 pieces of 3/4" x 1-1/2 PVC drain pipe to use as rings to put the tennis balls in so they won't roll around.
IF you're going to hang the unit from the ceiling, the noise will be transmitted to the people upstairs...unless you use rubber bungee cords.
Egg cartons will dissipate some reflective sound, but in a very narrow band of frequencies. basically useless for your problem as the compressor puts out wide-bandwidth energy. The absorption of a medium is measurable by the thickness as it is a multiple of the wave-length. Therefore, carpet will only kill very small (high) frequencies. The thicker, the better.
A box with a muffin fan... yup.. works for me.
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I finally replaced my free craftsman 30 gal amazing 5.5hp compressor with a nice small 4 gal non oiless compressor. the noise was so bad even with hearing protection it was horrible. I guess it got jealous as it died the next time I tried using it two weeks later (G) took the pump off and hooked it to my smaller compressor. the smaller one will actually fill it's tank and the 30 gallon tank faster then the craftsman did. Knight-Toolworks http://www.knight-toolworks.com affordable handmade wooden planes
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Read through the responses. Have you asked your neighbors if it is bothering them?
Jim
Upscale wrote:

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No, not so far. I feel that the once or twice weekly, 10 minutes use of the compressor in the daytime is not of long enough duration that I need do so. Hell the fire alarm in the building goes off much more often that I use my compressor. That doesn't stop me from being aware of my neighbour's comfort. Better to think about it too much than not enough as far as I'm concerned.
However, if I could abate some of the potential for noise, I'm sure I could find increased usage for the compressor.
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Upscale wrote:

I have made my compressor significantly quieter by boxing it in. I have it under a bench and enclosed it with Pegboard. Two doors on the front, framed pegboard. I don't know the mechanics of why it works but it does and the Pegboard allows plenty of airflow. I have my scroll saw on top the bench and when working it and the compressor kicks into life it's fine. Before the enclosure it scared the sh@t out of me every time :) regards I also have the none wheeled end sitting on some 1/4" insertion rubber just a piece about 6" square. John
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Just plain pegboard? Are you using the thicker 1/4" stuff with the bigger holes or the thinner stuff with the corresponding smaller holes? Can I assume you haven't lined the box with anything?
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Upscale wrote:

I tried placing egg cartons on the back wall (Shed), but they made no difference. It is significantly louder where there are gaps in the doors etc. The overall effects are quite comfortable with the peg board. Regards John
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Thanks, I'll give it a try. Pegboard is really cheap so the worst that can happen is that I waste $15 for what at the very least, would be a learning experience. Providing it produces a noticeable diminishing of sound volume, I'd hazard a guess that the holes in the pegboard diffuse the sound enough to prevent a measure of resonance.
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What would work even better, is two layers of peg-board, 1" apart with the holes off-set from each other with a thin layer of fibre glass insulation in between. That how I designed soundproof operators enclosures for Ontario Hydro's RL Hearn Generating Station (The one at the Leslie Spit). Peckover's in Concord will sell you perforated metal. Easy to cut and fold. Use 3/8" holes on the inner enclosure, 1" hard fibreglass insulation and 1/4" holes on the outside. (You'd still need a muffin fan though, as the rigid insulation isn't very "airy") That would be the fire-proof version. The upside of the rigid insulation would be that the inner and outer enclosures would not have to be mechanically connected, again stopping noise from transmitting.
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I'll keep it in mind. As a start, I can try the single layer peg board version and if that doesn't produce sufficient noise abatement, then I can consider going with the second layer as you've laid out above.
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Robatoy wrote:

I'll keep that in mind. Thanks Regards John
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I appreciate that feed-back, John.
Cool.
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Generally speaking, the oil-less compressors seems louder than non oil-less.
We used to keep the shop compressor just outside in an old full-height freezer. And when the compressor exploded one day, we think the freezer may have reduced the amount of shrapnel that came though the wall.

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