Minimal bottom nib

Am looking for a way to make a 1 1/2" dia. hole, ~1 1/2" deep with minimal bottom indentation (flat-bottomed hole). I have a 1/2 hp drill press and a 3/4 hp lathe.
38 mm is also acceptable.
I want to make the hole in one pass. This is not a critical appearance item but, of course, better is better.
What is my best choice of drill bit and who, if you know, has them for yesterday delivery?
Bill
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Check out a Forstner bit. They are designed to do just what you describe. It will leave a small dimple in the bottom center of the hole and, if that's objectionable to you, you could grind off the centering nib from the bit.
They are readily available and most good hardware stores carry them as does the woodworking stores such as Rockler and Woodcraft. http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page 954&filter=forstner
Art

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I have used a Forstner bits with half way decent results HarorFreight carries an inexpensive set that has the size that you are looking for. Also Cummins Industrial Tools has a good set of Forstner bits as well.
Steven Raphael Ithaca MI http://www.geocities.com/steven_raphael/woodturnings1.html

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I like Lee Valley forstner bits, and in my experience they ship quite quickly. (However I'm in NY, same state as their shipping warehouse, but regardless, they process orders quickly). http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pB245&cat=1,180,42240 I've also found Harbor Freight forstner bits to be not too bad - obviously not as good as LV's, but really acceptable. May be a good choice if you're going to grind off the center nib. You could get a full set of forstners from HF, including a 1 1/2", for a little more than you'd pay to LV + shipping. http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber@062 If you're going to be drilling a lot of holes, though, the LV would definitely be worth it. Hope this helps, Andy
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Andy wrote:

Yeah, Andy ... a BIG help!
Compare the Lee Valley prices with these.
http://www.toolcenter.com/MULTI-SPUR_BITS.html
My eyes are getting old ... so maybe I just can't see where the >$50 difference comes in. The Lee Valley bits even look to have a heavier shank. The expensive bits MIGHT have a heavier black-oxide coating but black-ox work is jobbed out by the pound and is just for pretty ... it's an anti-oxidant coating, no more, no less.
"Made in Austria" might carry some weight ... but, for a $50 per bit difference, I don't care if they were made by the Keebler elves! A couple thousand holes from now I might regret those words, but a couple thousand holes from now I'll probably just buy another LV drill and keep on truckin'.
Hey Lee ... with minor hand sharpening, I'm expecting at least 2,000 holes in medium hardwood out of those bits --- think I'll get it? ;-)
Maybe someday I'll try that other bit, but for today, I'm placing an order with LV. Those other bits are for guys who have laser cross-hairs on their hand drills.
Bill
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You mentioned needing the bit yesterday. If you live in a sizeable city you should be able to find a Forstner bit there. Check with the local hard wood lumber yard, Grainger's, Sears?, or just about any Woodworking supply store.

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BillinDetroit wrote:
> Am looking for a way to make a 1 1/2" dia. hole, ~1 1/2" deep with > minimal bottom indentation (flat-bottomed hole). I have a 1/2 hp drill > press and a 3/4 hp lathe.
How many ways can you say "Forstner bit"?
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

I was hoping I'd overlooked something. An inch and a half Forstner into a small piece (no two alike so fixturing is 'iffy') might make for an interesting work holding exercise.
I wanted to avoid that.
Bill
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No vise? No clamps? Can you drill the hole first, in a larger piece, and then cut off the small workpiece you need?
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

It's for lathe turnings and the branch sections are already cut to approximate length (two years ago). My chuck won't fit into a 1.5" dia. recess. I'm gonna try turning -> drilling -> reverse and jam chuck to remove the foot. I'm not in love with jam chucks, either.
Might have to invest in a set of jaws and a second chuck if I am going to turn many of these (and I hope to turn a ton.)
Bill
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BillinDetroit wrote:

If you have a drill chuck for your tailstock (or borrow the one from your drill press) a Forstner bit should be no problem at low rpms. I've drilled holes that way in blocks that were only about 1/4" wider diameter than the bit. Slow and easy does it.
-- It's turtles, all the way down
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3 approaches come to mind.
1) quick-and-dirty: for a small number of holes, for cheap and good enough results grind a spade bit to what you need.
2) go buy a forstner bit. see other replies.
3) plunge router, straight bit with template guides and template. this is the slowest, best results and second cheapest (not counting the router...)
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3 approaches come to mind.
1) quick-and-dirty: for a small number of holes, for cheap and good enough results grind a spade bit to what you need.
2) go buy a forstner bit. see other replies.
3) plunge router, straight bit with template guides and template. this is the slowest, best results and second cheapest (not counting the router...)
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