Milwaukee 0234-6 Magnum 5.5 Amp 1/2-Inch Dril

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You can do much better, http://www.tylertool.com/mi023vsrmadr.html

You need to decide what you will do with a drill press before deciding on a particular type.

I live in Houston and it has very humid climate along with salt in the air when we get a southerly breeze. I have no real problem with rust at all. The rust potential will be more of a problem if you work in an air conditioned shop and let the shop warm up with humid air at night. Condensation on cool surfaces will cause rust. As long as your equipment does not experience sudden temperature changes it should do fine.

Exposed iron surfaces can be protected with TopCote.
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I wish to drill an accurate 5/8" hole, about 2 inches deep, in the bottom end of a maple banjo neck to hold the dowel stick. Here are some nice pics of what I have in mind:
http://www.flesherbanjo.com/minstrel2.html
I already have the calf's skin for the top, the hoop, the stock to make the metal parts, some fine rasps to carve a neck, etc.
I could probably "jury-rig" something to get the job done with a hand drill, and maybe that makes cents, but I thought a drill press was probably the right tool for this job and it seems like it may be "nearly indispensible" for the peg holes [and for those on a mountain ducimer (easier project) and a violin (harder project)].
So that is an overview of my most adventuresome woodworking ideas. What type of drill press would you suggest, if any?
i appreciate all of the comments that folks have contributed to this thread. I have learned a great deal from your replies to this thread and from all of your posts during the past several years!
Thank you, Bill
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wrote in message news:Tr-

I used a Rockwell 32" radial bench top for 30 years and pretty much knew what I wanted when I upgraded a couple of months ago. I bought a Delta 17-959L, this one http://www.deltaportercable.com/Products/ProductDetail.aspx?ProductID 685.
The big selling feature for me was that the spindle travel is just short of 5", spindle speed could be adjusted lower than 300 rpm. The slower speeds are better for large bits. Additionally the feature that won my decision was that the table tilts left and right 90 degrees and towards you 45 degrees which makes drilling compound angles a little easier. The table has T-Slots to attach fences or hold downs easily. I got mine for about $529.
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"Bill" wrote:

A drill press, a carbide tipped forstner bit, and some jigs gets the job done.

I'm confused, are you working with this guy or competing against him?
He's here in SoCal maybe 30 miles from me and you're 2,000+ miles away in Indiana.
Lew
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It's a small world. I'm not working with him nor competing against him, of course. Apparently we both appreciate "folk music". I enjoy listening to and playing music from yesteryear--and I find it a very short jump to be interested in building the instruments, or tinkering with them in the case of fiddle/violin.
"Art" takes many forms, as probably most of the people in this newsgroup magazine may agree. The more I look, listen, and think, the more that I feel that art is art is art. Maybe the sameness is a result of it all being a product of the human spirit.
I seem to have drifted from the Milwaukee -234-6, so I'll stop there.

Lou, I'm in Indiana and your 2000+ miles away in SoCal--I'm rather amazed that we're having this conversation at all! If you want to have some fun, download the free "GoogleEarth" program (if you haven't already tried it).
Bill
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I'm sorry, I meant to to type Lew, Mr. Hodgett.
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Here is a stout little drill that I bought a few years ago to replace a DeWalt that had been worked to death.
http://tinyurl.com/6lf8x2
At Lowes and very reasonably priced.
Max
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I'll answer with four craftsman stories.
1. I worked at the Museum of Erotic Art in SF back in early 70s. The in house carpentry shop was outfitted with all new Craftsman tools. Table saws, band saws, planers, etc. Within 5-6 weeks the carpenters (not me) were complaining and bearings were being replaced.
2. When I worked as a motorcycle mechanic, had some Craftsman hand tools. Two open end wrenches broke. "Sears will replace them for free", you say. I lived 100 miles from nearest Sears.
3. I bought a brand new Craftsman electric weed cutter. The design was such that the cutter line would eventually destroy the blade holder that trimmed the line, which it did in short order.
4. Had a friend who bought a Sears floor stand drill press (1/2"). Pure junk! Bearings were shot within a year and the quill was rough and jerky.
Craftsman does make some good tools. Screw/nut drivers come to mind. Their deep sockets are unbeatable for the price (on sale) and if you're not using them at home. I'll testify before gawd their older roll away tool boxes are indestructable. But, on the whole, most of their stuff is a crap shoot and if you have the money, spend it on something better. If you're working to make a living, avoid it like the plague.
my 2... nb
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...Snipped.
The 0234-6 is too much drill.
I have 3 main (hand) drills and the 0234-6 is one of them. The reason why I bought this drill is for the 1/2" chuck, low RPM and high torque. The same reasons that make it a poor choice as all-around household drill. You want something with less weight and higher RPM. And BTW you don't have to pay north of C-note to get a decent all-purpose corded drill. $50-$75 will get you a 3/8" keyless chucked drill from a quality manufacturer.
The day may come that you need that big boy, save your pennies until then.
If you have a good cordless drill (which, by your description of it's power, you do not) you will reach for it 90% of the time.
Happy drill buying
-Steve
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On Sun, 14 Jun 2009 11:22:20 -0400, "C & S"

I agree. However, he has a point about batteries. They are outlandishly expensive. That said, I currently have seven cordless drills (a couple because a new drill is often cheaper than a new set of batteries). My only corded drill is a Bosch hammer-drill I bought specifically for drilling into concrete walls and mixing thinset.

A trip to the toy store is always fun.
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krw wrote:
My only corded drill is a Bosch hammer-drill I bought

Yes, I also have a corded 3/8 Makita hammer drill. I only use it for drilling in concrete, but it would be good for a general purpose drill also, as it is speedy enough to mix paint:-) I don't use it for mixing paint because I have a corded 3/8 Sears (Dewalt) drill for that:-) I guess if I were only allowed to own one corded drill, the hammer drill would probably be it.
--
Jack
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wrote:

"Speedy enough for paint"???? You're not supposed to whip it.
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krw wrote:

The mixer I use needs a lot of speed. It's a flat round disk about 2" in diameter with slots/fins cut in the disk. I went on the internet to find one to show you but seems it's not made anymore. It is very old, but works really well at high speeds. Obviously there are many designs, most from what I saw don't require high speeds. I have 2 other styles of mixers but none work as well as this one. 900 rpm is too slow for this one, 2600 is fine. None of my cordless drills are fast enough for this mixer.
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Most ppl don't realize small drills (< 1/4") require higher rpms, so look for a corded 1/4" drill motor. Makita makes a corded drill motor that's 1/4" chuck and variable speed to 4500rmp.
http://www.toolsforless.com/product/3703/productSpecifications
If your paint mixer shaft is larger than 1/4", you may hafta change the chuck.
nb
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Bill wrote:

In answer to your question, no, it's not a good household drill due to the low RPM--it's fine for drilling steel with big twist drills but you're not going to be doing that very often if at all. The 5378-20 (or the equivalent from one of the other vendors) would be a far better bet for a general purpose household drill due to the dual speed range and the ability to easily sink a hole in concrete.
In all honesty, though, a good cordless would be a better bet. My 18v dewalt has over the past 15 years or so drilled everything I've thrown at it, and the newer ones have features that make me wish it would die and give me an excuse to upgrade. Yeah, eventually the batteries go but it's a small price to pay for the convenience. I finally gave away my corded Milwaukee because it never got used anymore and I hated to see a good tool gathering dust.
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J. Clarke wrote: The 5378-20 (or the

I agree, 100%. If your garage is block, sooner or later you will be adding electrical boxes, wood racks and that sort of stuff and a hammer drill with good bits will be a god send.

I agree, 100%. A small cordless, a large cordless and a corded hammer drill. I'd go for the 3/8" hammer drill so you can use it to mix paint. I use corded drill for mixing paint, and drilling concrete, not much else. Cordless drills are all low rpm, and so are 1/2" drills I think.
--
Jack
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Sorry, a bit late to the party, but that is waaay too much drill. Great to have around for them large hole-saw jobs or that shoulder dislocation that seems to be so popular these days. I have a 5370 5.5 amp, and I think it might have the same motor although that model has a 2-speed gearbox and hammer function. I love my little Makita 9/16" chuck 1501 HP. I use it all the time when there is an outlet nearby.
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You need two drills...
A 1/2" for the heavy stuff and a 3/8" for the regular stuff.
Look at the corded Makita for both.
The Makita is quite light and very powerful.
http://www.makita.com/en-us/Modules/Tools/ToolDetails.aspx?IDA2 http://www.makita.com/en-us/Modules/Tools/ToolDetails.aspx?ID45
In fairness to the other folks, most corded drills are very similar in price and performance. I normally recommend Porter Cable but my Makita seems to be a good bit lighter.
Bill wrote:

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Yes, I'm still "shopping". At first, I was impressed by someones remark that a corded drill will probably outlive the batteries in it's cordless cousin--but it's hard to overlook the convenience of a cordless drill. My next one will probably be a 3/8" cordless drill in the 12 to 14.4 volt range, keyless chuck.
Besides the cheap 3/8" cordless underdog I admitted to owning earlier, I also have a 35+ year old Craftsman 3/8" my dad gave me 12 years ago. I'll save up for the good 1/2" drill for when my requirments call for it.
Still waiting to close the deal on the house...the inspection didn't go as well as it could have. After that, I will buy ladders and rakes and all sorts of implements of construction!
Bill
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: I'm about to move into my first house--my wife and I already picked out the : washer and dryer so I"m starting to shop for the important stuff (like maybe : a Grizzly 1023 Table saw).
: Is the drill I mentioned in the subject line a good "general purpose" : household drill? I already have a lightweight, battery operated : "convenience" drill (which doesn't quite have enough torque to fully seat a : 1" screw : in a 4 by 4).
I'm coming late to this thread. I have a Milwaukee 3/8" holeshooter:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)45521150&sr=8-1
It's a fantastic drill. I would not pick the one you have, as I think the 850RPM maximum speed isn;t appropriate for a lot of household stuff.
I use the Milwaukee, and a cordless Bosch Lithium-Ion drill which is also fantastic. The combination can't be beat. The Bosch is this one:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)45521427&sr=1-11
It weighs under two pounds, and is very strong for its size. I added a keyless chuck for convenience.
    -- Andy Barss     
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