milling alum. with router

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accuracy has nothing to do with it. using a table saw for this is like using a table saw to slice bread. it may be possible, but why?
randy
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xrongor wrote:

I always use a bandsaw. Lathe is good for cinnamon rolls. <g>
-- Mark
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ya i think ill route me out some chocloate chip cookies!!
radny
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"xrongor" wrote in message ...

Randy, you may wish to re-read the thread. I don't recall anyone said to use a TS. When a thread gets long enough, Chinese whispers kick in.
cheers,
Greg
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says...

It's simple and safe in my experience, YMMV. . .
Kim
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I don't know where you got your feed and speed info from but it is way low. Average book speed (generally low. a safe starting point) is 600 sfm. This comes out to 4583 RPM with a 1/2" HSS 2 flute endmill. At that RPM, minimum feed would be 9" per minute. I typically run them at 6000 RPM at 30 to 35" per minute feed. While there are circumstances that double sided tape can be used as a hold down in a milling operation, this isn't one of them.
> FYI the recommended cutting speed for a 1/2" 2 flute end mill is 3000RPM,

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low.
minimum
<snip>
Thanks CW, I was being lazy and used the Rockford quick calculator (got to delete that thing). I agree about the method of hold down, just seemed that the general tone of the thread was that routing Al was in the same category as sticking your hand in acid.
Bernard R
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There are a lot of speed and feed calculators around and some of the worst I have seen are on the internet. See a Kennametal dealer and get one of there slide-card type calculators. They not only do feed and speed but depth of cut and horsepower requirements for the process. Routing aluminum works but the method the OP was thinking of was a recipe for disaster. There is a major aircraft manufacturer that, up until recently, made extensive use of router tables doing aluminum. These were standard router tables, standard fixed speed routers and the parts were fed by hand. Noisy and messy but it worked.

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