Micro Router Bits


Hi All:
This is from a OT question on another forum. (Details of use below.) The problem is finding a miniature router round over bit (or ogee bit) of 1/16 inch radius or less. Metric sizes would be OK. A hand molding plane of small size might also work.
The original poster in that other forum found small router bits that fit a Dremel like hand rotary power tool with an 1/8 inch shank, . A small router table was built to house a Dremel tool with the bit sticking up. However, when getting bits for Dremel like tool from a 3rd party, the quality of the HSS used and the sharpness of the cutting edges leaves LOTS to be desired.
For artistic reasons (and only for artistic reasons), a round over bit is needed for some woodworking scroll saw fretwork. Stock thickness is somewhere between 4mm and 6mm. Length and width about hand holding size. Needle files, Dremel rasp bits, and sanding don't have the uniform look wanted. I looked for a manual mini-hand plane, say something a Luthier might use, but no luck. Although, how the mini-hand plane blade get sharpened, I don't know.
Hand made Scraper blade? I seem to remember Roy Underhill doing a TV show about making a hand made scraper blade to do beading work. He made the scraper profile from an old rusty saw blade. I seem to recall it was WAY too much work to hand make such a tool. (had to make mini forge to soften blade metal, cut, and re-harden the steel.)
Phil
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router
the
plane,
blade
Bosch makes a 1/16" roundover bit, but it has a 1/4" shank. It's carbide
http://www.toolking.com/bosch/view.asp?idy01
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Thanks for the Bosh router bit link. I will pass it on.
Phil

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a small scratch stock is not so hard to make, I use one for 1/8" roundovers: http://home.att.net/~ShipModelFAQ/ShopNotes/smf-SN-Moldings.html knife blades would require grinding to shape, but pieces of saw blade can be shaped with files.
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Thanks for the link. I will pass that link on just in case.
But, the problem is cutting off a piece of saw blade. The person in SW England, at best can come up with a hack saw. I don't think a hack saw will work too well on an old saw blade.
Phil
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Yeah, they're still pretty primitive in SW England.

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Dremel makes a 3/32" 1/8 shank bit. #612. that's a bit larger than you asked for but maybe you can use it?
Dave
Another Phil wrote:

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Go down to your local woodworking store, buy a scraper, use a needle file to put a slot in it.

router
the
plane,
blade
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Yes, but... the problem is cutting the scraper down to a width that would make it useable. I was thinking that the steel of a scraper is like a saw blade. A hack saw is not going to work too well.
The person in England has very limited tool selection available.
Phil
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On Sat, 7 May 2005 08:17:11 -0400, the inscrutable "Another Phil"

Surely a UK importer has the 3" x 1/16" high-speed cutoff wheels that HF imports here. They make quick work of hardened steel. I used to cut bearing races with them. See examples here: http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber03 These things are just TOO handy!

Right, and without those scary dado blades to hurt them, either. Let's hope for their sake that die grinders haven't been outlawed.
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No, that full 360 degree blade gaurd keeps them safe. :)
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For small scrapers, pallet banding works well. Can be cut to size with heavy shears, cold chisel, cutoff disk, ect. File to shape.

A
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You might be interested in the cutters that the inlay experts make for their tasks. Michael Fortune and Steve Latta are two names that come to mind. I'm pretty sure there are others.
The cutter Michael Fortune described in the short presentation I saw was made from a cabinet scraper. No heat was required.
You may also wish to consider if the Garrett-Wade people have something that could work for you. It seems there was an assortment of electronics and/or dental tools available.
Patriarch
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Patriarch:
Thanks for the idea on Google search, Inlay tools that Luthiers use. I seem to have gotten a few hits. I will pass the info on.
Oh, and as normal for my own personal experiences lately, Garrett-Wade had nothing to offer of any use.
Phil
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